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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    35
    Location
    North Carolina
    Tractor
    Shabaura D28F

    Default Shibaura D28F (tire loading)

    I was wondering if it possible to load my tires myself If so how?If not Can a tire shop do it or who do I take it to.

  2. #2
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
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    18,045
    Location
    Bethel, Vermont
    Tractor
    John Deere 4400 MFWD, Deere 855D UTV and assorted implements

    Default Re: Shibaura D28F

    Well, to load the tires yourself, you'll need:

    Jack (get the tires off the surface), put the jack under the bracket the drawbar goes through.

    Jackstands, one under each side of the rear axle.

    Air/liquid tire gage, try your local tractor dealer or NAPA

    Liquid (of course), what do you plan to use? CaCl or windshield washer fluid?

    Air/Liquid adapter for your valve stems (NAPA or your local dealer)

    Valve core tool (removes the valve cores so you can pump the liquid in...also NAPA or yr dealer)

    Low pressure pump (the ones that go in a drill chuck are cheapest and portable)

    Jack the tractor

    Place Jackstands under the rear axle, lower the jack enough that the axle rests on the jackstands. The rear tires should be an inch or a bit off the surface.

    Rotate one of the tires so the valve stem is at the 10:00 O'Clock position.

    Using the Valve Core tool, bleed out most of the pressure in the tire before removing the valve core.

    Remove the valve core (just unscrews from the stem). The tire will deflate. Strongly suggest you wear eye protection as the cores do fly (even if you've let most the pressure out). It's worth while buying a pack of valve cores too, by the way. They're cheap...and if one does fly, you won't lose an hour trying to find it. Extra cores are a good thing to have on hand, anyway....so are some extra valve caps

    Thread the Air/Liquid adapter on to the valve stem.

    Rig the pump to a short hose (on the intake side) and a hose to the pressure side (I had to make one of these up from an old hose...)

    Start pumping. Pump right from the liquid container or use a bucket. There's a bleeder on the air/liquid adapter...you'll need to bleed air out of the tire occasionally as the liquid displaces the air. About every 30-60 seconds worked for me...I bleed more frequently as the tire fills with liquid.

    In a while, depending on how much liquid you need (don't fill beyond ~75% (i.e. the 10:00 positioning of the valve stem)), you'll get a solid stream of liquid. That's the indicator that you've completed that tire.

    Go to the other tire and repeat the process.

    If you want CaCl, you ought to take the tires to a dealer (have help when you retrieve them...they'll be pretty heavy) since that stuff is pretty corrosive and kills any vegetation it contacts. If you do use it, make sure you flush any spills with plenty of water.

    Took me about an hour per tire. I pumped about 11 gallons per side. The drill pumps are cheap, but low volume, so it takes a while.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    672
    Location
    Tupper Lake, NY
    Tractor
    Kubota B7500 HSD

    Default Re: Shibaura D28F (tire loading)

    I had a guy from Goodyear come to my property and load my tires with calc. He also installed inner tubes. The price was $250.00

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    2,518
    Location
    Capital District, Upstate New York
    Tractor
    Satoh S650G, MF135, MF165, JD5205

    Default Re: Shibaura D28F (tire loading)

    <font color="blue">...if it possible to load my tires myself ... </font>

    If ya follow Roy's procedure... it's a piece of cake... [img]/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif[/img]

    I'll add just a couple mods... [img]/forums/images/graemlins/blush.gif[/img]

    I place the valve stem @ the 12 o'clock position, and pick up a plastic 20-30 gallon tub from K-mart or WalMart ($5-7.)... find out from a tire chart exactly how many gallons of fluid the tire will hold... then pour those gallons into your tub (that's raised in the air, held up by the back of the loader bucket or hefty picnic table...),

    using the plastic tub as your fill reservoir...

    1) you will never lose the pump prime
    2) you can keep track of the gallons of fluid you are actually dispersing (ex. if the tire chart says ~50 gallons-no guess work!)

    Try not to break the bead on the tire when filling (keep the tire off the ground and up in the air), otherwise you may have potential future problems of "popping" the tire if it wasn't truly seated to begin with... [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    425
    Location
    SW Alabama
    Tractor
    NH TC-33D

    Default Re: Shibaura D28F (tire loading)

    Roy did such a good job and I agree with John's suggestions. I'll only add a word of caution. If you take the tires to a dealer, Roy said <font color="blue">(have help when you retrieve them...they'll be pretty heavy)</font> Which is a bit of an understatement. Those things will be really heavy. What I would suggest is that if you don't do it yourself you should take the entire tractor to the dealer and let them fill them while installed.

  6. #6
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
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    Location
    Bethel, Vermont
    Tractor
    John Deere 4400 MFWD, Deere 855D UTV and assorted implements

    Default Re: Shibaura D28F (tire loading)

    Yeah...did forget one thing...

    When you get the solid stream of water, re-install the core and put air in the tire (depends what you think you need. I keep about 15 PSI in mine).

    And, I did use windshield washer fluid.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    1,390
    Location
    South Central Oklahoma
    Tractor
    Kubota Grand L4610HSTC

    Default Re: Shibaura D28F (tire loading)

    If you are in a climate zone where freezing is an issue then check the charts regarding the freezing point of the CaCl mixture. Stronger mix will withstand lower temps before freezing. Can mix for temps down under -40 if you want. Also stronger the mix the heavier it is.

    Yes, the stuff is mucho corrosive and any itsy bitsy scratch in the paint on the wheel will corrode like crazy. There are two possible indications of impending wheel failure: 1. not likely but you may notice a leak through the steel. and 2. the wheel will collapse (you will notice!) causing a dangerous situation.

    You can clean the inside of the wheel prior to using CaCl and do a RhinoLining or do it yourself equivalent to the inside of the wheel and add decades to the life of the wheel.

    Pat

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    35
    Location
    North Carolina
    Tractor
    Shabaura D28F

    Default Re: Shibaura D28F (tire loading)

    well how much do you think a 26" tire would hold?

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    2,518
    Location
    Capital District, Upstate New York
    Tractor
    Satoh S650G, MF135, MF165, JD5205

    Default Re: Shibaura D28F (tire loading)

    What is the exact tire size? (need more info)

  10. #10
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
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    Bethel, Vermont
    Tractor
    John Deere 4400 MFWD, Deere 855D UTV and assorted implements

    Default Re: Shibaura D28F (tire loading)

    I've posted a liquid ballast chart over three .jpg's. This might help you.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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