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  1. #41
    Elite Member hazmat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    4,028
    Location
    West Newbury, MA & Harrison, ME
    Tractor
    Kubota L5460HSTC

    Default Re: Starter Torque

    <font color="blue"> It's gotta be the varying frictional coefficent of different metal chrystalline lattice form contact boundary layers subjected to thermodynamic pressure that make the difference Nomad. </font>

    Egon,

    You're making me re-live my tribology class from college. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif[/img]

  2. #42
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    19,400
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada

    Default Re: Starter Torque

    Think it means friction between different metals but actually it's just buffledust Hazmat.

    Egon [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

  3. #43
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    162
    Location
    WV Panhandle
    Tractor
    Kioti DK45

    Default Re: Starter Torque

    Here is the starter current waveform for a 1980's SAME #35, 2 cylinder, 1810cc diesel engine. The compression ratio is 17:1. This engine is direct injected. The inrush current for this 2 cylinder, 1810cc diesel is nearly equal to the 4 cylinder diesels inrush current. I captured two starting current waveforms and will post both to show you how reproducible the measuring methodology is. Any comments?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #44
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    162
    Location
    WV Panhandle
    Tractor
    Kioti DK45

    Default Re: Starter Torque

    Second SAME waveform.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #45
    Super Member _RaT_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    5,815
    Location
    Northern CA.
    Tractor
    none, nothing, nada

    Default Re: Starter Torque

    Rather then even consider in rush or stalled rotor current, I think looking at the current while turning an engine over for 5 or 10 seconds would be the most beneficial measurement. Stalled rotor and in rush current can be explained simply by the design of the electric motor, the same can be said while the starter is running, but to a lesser extent. All things being equal, temp, battery and starter, a 10 second crank on a non startable engine should help evaluate the engines resistance to rotation. That of course would be difficult at best since rarely do 2 different engines share identical starters. In rush current for an electric (120V) light bulb can exceed 100 amps since in effect, the filament is a dead short. Not until it heats up does the resistance develop. That amount of time is in the 1/1000's of a second and thus never realized by the service suppyling it. I found your charts interesting and credit you for all your work, it is interesting. Rat...

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