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  1. #1
    Platinum Member
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    2001 Kubota B2910

    Default Removing a steering wheel

    My steering wheel is getting progressively more loose (I have both up and down and side to side play) and I would like to tighten the nut or see if there is an upper bearing that can be tightened. I think I know what is causing the problem (lifting my big b*tt up off the seat by grabbing the wheel), and if I can make it stronger, that is an option too.

    Now to my problem. I have a kubota B2910, and I need to know how to take the center cap off of the steering wheel. I can pry it partially loose by pulling up with my fingers, but it feels like it is still hooked to something. Before I go digging the center Kubota emblem off the wheel to see what's under there, I thought I would ask here first. I've looked in my manual and they just say to remove the cap, but absolutely no procedure on how to do that.

    Anybody ever take their's off?

    Thanks for any help. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

  2. #2
    Gold Member KENSFM's Avatar
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    MA
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    JD 2210 JD318 JD332

    Default Re: Removing a steering wheel

    Most of the caps are held on by a large o-ring that fits in a groove in the cap. Try prying the cap up "carefully" with a small screw driver to see if you can see the o-ring. If you can just keep prying and lifting and the cap should come off. Be "careful" so that you do not break the cap, and like I said "most" are held on this way but yours may be different.
    Good luck,Ken [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

  3. #3
    Epic Contributor RoyJackson's Avatar
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    John Deere 4520 MFWD, Deere 855D UTV, Z920A Zero Turn Mower and assorted implements

    Default Re: Removing a steering wheel

    You really want a workshop manual if you're going to do this kind or work.
    That cap could be held on by an O-ring, or clips. Although prying it off probably won't damage anything, if you're going to tighten the steering wheel nut, it would be nice to know the required torque, if any. It might be locked down using a lockwasher of some sort, or a cotter pin (the wheel, that is..not the cap).

  4. #4
    Old Timer Soundguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Removing a steering wheel

    If your steering box is anything like my fords box's.. then DEFFINATELY get a shop manual. At least you are looking at shimming and possibly new thrust bearings.

    Soundguy

  5. #5
    Platinum Member
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    2001 Kubota B2910

    Default Re: Removing a steering wheel

    Thanks Ken,

    I'll take a better look at it. And to Roy and Soundguy, I appreciate the manual advice, but as I posted before.

    <font color="blue"> I've looked in my manual and they just say to remove the cap, but absolutely no procedure on how to do that.
    </font>

    I have both the parts and service manual, and I can't find any reference to removal of the cap. I just didn't want to take my usual course of action and break the cap and have to buy a new one.

    Thanks again, [img]/forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif[/img]

  6. #6

    Join Date
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    North East CT
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    2003 Kubota BX-22

    Default Re: Removing a steering wheel

    If the cap is held on by an "O" ring, give it a spray of silicone and it should help to get it off. As to the problem of the looseness, I doubt that it is the steering wheel nut. That nut is only there to keep the wheel from coming off the splined or tapered shaft and its torque is not adjustable. They are normally just tightened down and there is no adjustment. There is a upper column steering shaft bearing in all probability that is allowing the side movement, but I wouldn't attribute its failure to your pulling on the wheel getting up onto the tractor. They just fail from age and they usually aren't very precision bearings to start with. Moving onto the rest of the problem. If it is in the steering box, then you need to adjust the box itself. Read the manual and make sure that you are completely familiar with all the procedures of adjustment before attempting this. If you over tighten a steering box gears, you will destroy the bearings in the box. The box needs to be adjusted in a specific set of adjustments done in a specific sequence. If you don't, you will destroy the steering box. If your manual doesn't give you instructions on the adjustment, please let me know and I can give you some general information guidance with it....... assuming that it is similar to the ones that I have worked on......

  7. #7
    Old Timer Soundguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Removing a steering wheel

    Yikes.. if orange makes manuals that are that devoid of info.. I think i'd either find an aftermarket manual or a tractor with better support. Otherwise working on it sounds like a bugger.

    Even my 58 year old ford 2N has complete dealer and and aftermartket shop manuals, master parts catalog and service manuals, showing disassembly of the machine down to the last nut and bolt. Even assemblies that are only sold as a 'set' and with no individual parts availability are shown disassembled.

    Sorry to hear that your much newer 'bota doesn't have that kind of support.

    Good luck on the repair.

    Soundguy

  8. #8
    Platinum Member
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    2001 Kubota B2910

    Default Re: Removing a steering wheel

    Hi Junkman,

    After prying up and looking under the cap, I found the secret attachments (in the above attachment). 3 posts go into 3 holes in the rubber cover of the wheel. Then I was able to determine that the upper steering shaft bearing is not adjustable. I'm just going to have to replace it when it gets too bad. They aren't a very substantial bearing when you consider that lard butts such as myself tend to grab onto the steering wheel to help get up off the seat. I suspected the bearings from the start as the wheel nut wouldn't give you lateral play.

    Soundguy, I don't think the orange manuals are any better or worse than any other Japanese manual, it's just that they tend to gloss over the "easy" parts in favor of more info for the "hard" stuff. That is a common factor of almost any repair manual. They are written by engineer types that assume too much knowledge of the people working on the (fill in the blank).

    When I was a parts manager for a Chevy dealer years ago, we had the same problem with the GM manuals on a daily basis. I would have to show mechanics a parts blow up to help them remove things as the manual didn't give enough info.

    Thanks for the help guys. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9

    Join Date
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    2003 Kubota BX-22

    Default Re: Removing a steering wheel

    I guess that it is onto the adjustment phase of the gear box. If you can post a couple of pictures of the gear box, then I can help with the adjustment procedure. I am assuming that it is typical of the steering gear boxes of the automobiles of the 1940 - 1970 period before rack and pinion..

  10. #10
    Old Timer Soundguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Removing a steering wheel

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( Soundguy, I don't think the orange manuals are any better or worse than any other Japanese manual, it's just that they tend to gloss over the "easy" parts in favor of more info for the "hard" stuff. That is a common factor of almost any repair manual. They are written by engineer types that assume too much knowledge of the people working on the (fill in the blank).
    )</font>

    The service manual from yanmar (only jap manual I have exp with ) ( domestic version ) was kind bland and useless.. however the jap parts book was decent..Most of the times the exploded diagram is all you need to get a job going.


    New, oem domestic tractor manuals like the one NH provided with my 1920 are ok for maintenance.. but thats it. For anything involved a shop manual is needed. When comparing my oem old dealers shop manual for my old fords, compaired to an aftermarket manual.. like an intertec.. the aftermarket wins hands down. The front cover of the I&amp;T manul even states that the info is presented as if the user has mechanical skills.. though I've never had a problem reading/using it to make a repair.. even on somehting I had never been into before.. For instance.. I rebuilt the steering gearbox from the bottom up on my 52 8n a few years ago...and it was all cookbook as i had never had one apart before.

    Perhaps 'poor manuals' are a way for dealer services to be sold?

    Soundguy

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