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  1. #11
    Super Member
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    Apr 2000
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    6,226
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    central New York
    Tractor
    all makes and models

    Default Re: Turbo charger question

    Between the Ag industry and the industrial there might be a set up that would virtually bolt on as far as the externals. Many turbo'd engines do offer different pistons as well as jets of oil that spray the bottoms of the pistons to help with the cooling of them do to the increased heat. With the normal operation of a TLB there is not any extended times that Ifeel it would be needed as they aren't like a dozer or ag tractor that often would be calling on the boost for power for extended times vs the short intervals that a TLB might be under load.

  2. #12

    Default Re: Turbo charger question

    Thanks to all who took the time to give me some answers! It seems that the consensus is to "Not" put a turbo on an engine that did not come from the factory with one. One suggestion is to put a "supercharger" instead. How complicated is this? What's the difference? Cost? Are these readily available? Thanks again! I appreciate it.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    1,064
    Tractor
    Yanmar 1500D

    Default Re: Turbo charger question

    Turbochargers are exhaust driven. Superchargers are driven off the crankshaft via belts or gears. The blowers you see sitting on the tops of drag racers are superchargers.

    A few years ago there was a supercharger kit you could get to add to your car. It consisted of a blower about the size of an alternator and the brackets to mount it to your engine. It was belt driven just like the alternator. After mounting, you mounted flexible pipe to get the pressurized air to the carb and the supplied filter was mounted on the inner fender to filter air before it went into the blower.

    I don't think they caught on and am not sure if anything like that is still available. But it was a good idea for getting lots of fresh air into the engine for combustion.

  4. #14
    Super Member JerryG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
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    7,201
    Location
    Northwest Arkansas
    Tractor
    MF 1440-4 PowerShuttle

    Default Re: Turbo charger question

    You can still get the car superchargers. In fact, the same company that supplied the supercharger for the 50's T-Birds is still in business. Paxton

  5. #15

    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    1,064
    Tractor
    Yanmar 1500D

    Default Re: Turbo charger question

    Ah yes.............Paxton Superchargers.

    I had forgotten the name.

  6. #16
    Platinum Member v8dave's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    617
    Location
    Northern, Calif.
    Tractor
    Kubota 7610

    Default Re: Turbo charger question

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( " Turbo may reqiure larger injectors to prevent a lean conditon(heat problem)."

    The turbo is going to need larger injectors to produce more power. Added air doesn't do anything in itself, it allows you to burn more fuel which is where you get the added power. Less fuel means less heat in a diesel, it will run cooler if you add a turbo and don't uprate the injectors.
    )</font>

    bgott has it correct. You need more fuel to get the extra power.

    But, there may be some confusion as to the difference between gasoline and Diesel engine injectors.

    On gasoline fuel injected engines you need to increase the size of the injectors to get more fuel in the intake manifold. On a hopped up gas car you run out of time to squirt in additional fuel with the stock injectors. You put higher capacity injectors on and the fuel volume per period of time goes up. Thus, taking advantage of the hop-up equipment (or supercharger/turbo). The gas car engine computer measures the exhaust gasses for the correct air/fuel ratio and adjusts the duration of the fuel pulse to keep the air/fuel ratio correct--no rich, no lean mixtures, just the 14:1 (??) ideal ratio. The throttle controls the amount of air going into the engine--the computer controls the fuel.

    Diesel engines always have an excess of air to fuel. Thus, they always run "lean" to some degree. At idle a Diesel may run at better than a 50:1 air to fuel ratio, under power it will still likely be greater than 20:1 air to fuel ratio. This is why Diesels are always more efficient than gas engines. The throttle/governor on a Diesel controls the fuel, air is unlimited and is what ever is pumped (sucked) by the engine. [Although some Diesel engine shut-offs cut off the air supply to stop the motor.]

    You may not need bigger injectors to get more fuel into a Diesel. You get more fuel by changing the injector pump settings. If the injectors will handle the increased volume of fuel, you probably won't have to change them. If you do change them it would be likely to get a different spray pattern to better handle the [effective] increased compression ratio that results from the turbocharger.

    I believe Case has a turbo version of your tractor, or close anyway. The best bet would be to get a complete pull-off set of turbo, plumbing, manifolds and injection pump (and maybe intercooler?) from a wrecking yard. If Case does have this, check the parts catalog for a difference between the engine oil pump for both versions. A fair volume of engine oil is used to cool/lubricate the turbo. There may be a bigger oil pump on the turbo motor.

    Dave

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