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  1. #11
    Platinum Member Av8r3400's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    684
    Location
    North Central Wisconsin
    Tractor
    Kubota L3400DT

    Default Re: Can you overcharge a battery with trickle charger

    These units have a multi color LED which shows "charge or maintain (off)" status. So they do not put out a constant .25 amp to the battery. They are meant and designed to be left on the battery for extended periods of time. I've used them for several winters now and the 5 year old battery in my motorcycle is still very serviceable and will last the season for sure.

  2. #12
    Elite Member SPIKER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    3,978
    Location
    Ohio, Jeromesville, Ashland County
    Tractor
    Jinma 284

    Default Re: Can you overcharge a battery with trickle charger

    you have to watch which one you get:

    there are MAINTAINERS and then there are trickle chargers. the trickle chargers can over charge while the maintainers are designed to shut off and on as needed to keep battery up.

    markM

  3. #13
    Elite Member RalphVa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,791
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA, USA
    Tractor
    JD 1025, previously Gravely 5650 & JD 4010

    Default Re: Can you overcharge a battery with trickle charger

    You can hook up a trickle charger through 2 of those 24 hour timers, each set for about 1-2 hours each. I did this on my car battery in the basement of the house for 9 months while in Singapore. Came back, took battery up to garage, installed in the diesel Benz, glowed it for the required period; the engine started instantly.

    Ralph

  4. #14
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    1,436
    Location
    Byron New York
    Tractor
    2004 BX2230

    Default Re: Can you overcharge a battery with trickle charger

    Another idea if your interested would be a marine deep cycle battery. Their designed to power all the way to nothing and recharge without damage to the battery.
    Regular batteries don't like this cycle idea as they fail faster. The only trickle charge issues I have is boiling all the water out of the battery exposing the metal plates inside. Then the battery is shot not too long after that.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    175
    Location
    South Central, PA.
    Tractor
    Various: J.D. 110TLB, 320S.S., 4010, 445, 757

    Default Re: Can you overcharge a battery with trickle charger

    For what it is worth, here is what I have learned through years of "learning" about my equipment batteries; Essentially there are five different types of chargers

    1. High amp, fast charge (generally has a starting position)
    2. Low amp, slow charge (as in some deep cycle chargers)
    3. Battery tenders
    4. Battery minders
    5. Trickle chargers

    Some chargers are a combination of 1 & 2.

    Tenders charge at about 1.00 to 1.25 amps until the battery is "topped-off." They then go into "float" and do not charge until the battery voltage drops.

    Maintainers charge at about 1.00 to 1.25 amps until the battery is fully charged, then go into a float/desulfation mode. The desulphation mode is supposed to prevent sulfation of the plates allowing the battery to last longer.

    Trickle chargers charge at 1.00 to 1.25 amps continuously.

    Continuously charging at a any amperage will cause overheating/boiling.

    The only problem you would have to contend with is that if you use a tender or maintainer and the power does go out and the pump reverts to battery power, I think the "safety circuit" in the charging unit may "trip." You would then have to "re-set" it when the power comes back on.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    3
    Location
    Texas and NE Wis.
    Tractor
    JD 4200 HST

    Default Re: Can you overcharge a battery with trickle charger

    You should check out batterytender.com. They have two sizes, and they can be left on indefinitely. I use them for 4 wheelers, my JD 4200, and snowmobiles. Ken

  7. #17
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    268
    Location
    Eastern Ontario
    Tractor
    JD 855, 322, AMT626 plus whatever my son dragged home this month

    Default Re: Can you overcharge a battery with trickle charger

    Thanks to all - ordered a Deltran Battery Tender Jr. for $40 CDN versus the $15 1 amp trickle charger I was going to get.

    Now just need to do all the plumbing and wiring - and a test run!

    BTW - total cost is about $80 plus battery versus the $249.99 plus battery for the canned solution available at Home Depot and I think it only has a trickle charger.

  8. #18
    Super Member
    Rest in Peace
    frank_f15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    6,033
    Location
    BUFFALO ,NEW YORK AREA
    Tractor
    kubota b2400- R4 tires

    Default Re: Can you overcharge a battery with trickle charger

    I GUESS everyone has given you their opinion, but it really comes down to the CHARGER YOU HAVE. i personnaly don't care for constant on chargers, but again i am kind of an old fashioned kind of coot

  9. #19
    Veteran Member NY_Yankees_Fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    2,063
    Location
    Warren County, NJ (60 miles from NYC)
    Tractor
    Kubota BX 2200

    Default Re: Can you overcharge a battery with trickle charger

    I have been using this float charger from Harbor Freight on my 1993 Caddy for over a year now, no problems. I picked it up on sale for $7, it usually sells for $15.

    web page

  10. #20
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    3,044
    Location
    Windham County, Conn
    Tractor
    Ford 2120 , New Holland TN75D, Hitachi UH083LC Excavator

    Default Re: Can you overcharge a battery with trickle charger

    I haven't been on much for a while, but when ever I see a post on electronics and batteries I read it to see what is being said. Please take what I am going to say in a constructive way. Much of what is in this post and other posts on this board regarding electrical systems, and particularly batteries and charging is "heresay" and old wives tales. Much of it is also true (or at least partially true info). What I would like to get out are some facts. Lead acid battery technology is not new. It is well understood. You may ask how does this guy know about battery technology and vehicle charging systems? I would. I have 35 years as a practicing electrical engineer and considerable time working with Delco engineers on vehicle electrical systems managing the team that designed the first Bose car stereo.

    First when you overcharge a battery that gas that is being emitted is HYDROGEN. Read that HYDROGEN BOMB--VERY DANGEROUS. A slight spark and you may not have a head. Please take this advice seriously. Many people each year suffer very serious facial injuries from exploding batteries.

    Battery chargers are basically broken down into 2 types

    Constant Voltage (CV) or Constant Current (CC).

    Within limits a CV battery charger holds its output to a constant voltage (about 13.8 vdc for a lead acid 6 cell battery). The current is also limited (hence the rating of the charger). When the batteries terminal voltage equals the chargers output voltage, all current flow should stop. (and maintain a trickle flow) (various events may cause this to not work perfectly)

    A CC chargers is just that. It puts out a constant current regardless (within limits) as the battery charges. It can overcharge a bettery if it also does not limit the final battery voltage either by time some other mechanism.

    Each charger type can also be broken down one more time. Those which monitor the batteries charge state and those who don't. These days it is very easy to make a small analog or digital computer control system to monitor the batteries charge state and have the chargeer keep the battery perfectly charged. Temperature ( a big factor) can lso be taken into account.

    In my opinion the fastest way to charge a battery is constant currect , where the current is tapered down at the end (which it need to do to "fully top off a battery") in a monitored charger which monitors not only the batteries charge status but also the batteries temp.

    Hope this is some what useful info.

    Andy

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