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  1. #11
    Gold Member
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    Sep 2004
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    489
    Location
    Nashville, TN / Hickory, NC
    Tractor
    Kioti DK55C

    Default Re: Tow Chains

    A also noticed the HF sale. What about the nylon tow straps. I think they were rated for 8500lbs? Is it safe to use these to pull things around - downed trees etc? Nylon Strap

    We've got a Harbour Freight so I'll be making a trip out there this week.


  2. #12
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    623
    Location
    Tully, NY (Syracuse)
    Tractor
    Kubota L3010HST

    Default Re: Tow Chains

    The nylon straps will wear very quickly if you try to use them for dragging things around. You really need chain for this.

    Good Luck,
    Kevin


  3. #13
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    623
    Location
    Tully, NY (Syracuse)
    Tractor
    Kubota L3010HST

    Default Re: Tow Chains

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( "MBS = Minimum Breaking Force
    Do not use MBS as criteria for service or design purposes."

    In the linked chain chart..... I am beginning to think that G70 is just gold plated G43. A marketing ploy. )</font>


    Highbeam,

    I'm not sure how you came to that conclusion. For example, for 3/8" chain the WLL is 5400# for the G43 and 6600# for the G70. The MBS for the same chaine is 16,200# for the G43 and 26,400 for the G70.

    The MBS disclaimer is simply to point out that you can't use this number for a working load since there is no safety factor then built in. Using the WLL ensures that their is still an adequate safey factor.

    Good Luck,
    Kevin



  4. #14
    Super Member Highbeam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,039
    Location
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Tractor
    Kioti CK30HST

    Default Re: Tow Chains

    I'm sorry, I meant to point out that WLL is the only real number to go by. The MBS isn't to that level yet. Shop and buy by the WLL.

    Our loggers here in the NW use cable for almost all log dragging. Chain is the next best thing for dragging. There is lots of abrasion in a dragging situation, such abrasion would destroy the strap.

  5. #15
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    2,033
    Location
    Casey County, Kentucky

    Default Re: Tow Chains

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( Our loggers here in the NW use cable for almost all log dragging. Chain is the next best thing for dragging. There is lots of abrasion in a dragging situation, such abrasion would destroy the strap.
    )</font>The loggers are usually protected by some sort of cage should the cable break or somehow come loose and fly towards the operator. For an open tractor, I would stick with chains for dragging things around.

  6. #16
    Epic Contributor RoyJackson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    20,360
    Location
    Bethel, Vermont
    Tractor
    John Deere 4520 MFWD, Deere 855D UTV, Z920A Zero Turn Mower and assorted implements

    Default Re: Tow Chains

    "There is lots of abrasion in a dragging situation, such abrasion would destroy the strap."

    Yep....straps won't work...they are great for towing though.

    Chains don't take too much of a hit, unless you're dragging across stone or something harder then the chain. Also...if you can find some worn out firehose, run the chain through that. The hose is sacrificial...also, should a link let go, the fire hose will reduce the snap back. If you live in an area that depends on volunteer fire fighters, getting old hose isn't difficult. 1" hose works great.

    Personally, since I don't skid trees (mostly fallen branches and such) too often, if the load isn't too great, I pick the end of the tree or branch up in the bucket and use the chain to rig it for skidding. I'm normally going across a finished lawn, so this method minimizes the ruts. This method is not for heavy loads...that's what the draw bar is for. Also, one of our TBNer's can attest that the front assist gears in a 790 cannot take as much load in reverse as they can driving forward (busted the gears in the front differential).

    For a residential operator, the 5/16th's chain sold by Harbor Freight will work fine. I'm a residential operator...this is all I'll need.
    BTW, I would hesitate using this chain for tow a vehicle out of a ditch...but common sense will tell me when the load is too much.

  7. #17
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    489
    Location
    Nashville, TN / Hickory, NC
    Tractor
    Kioti DK55C

    Default Re: Tow Chains

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( "There is lots of abrasion in a dragging situation, such abrasion would destroy the strap."

    Yep....straps won't work...they are great for towing though.

    Chains don't take too much of a hit, unless you're dragging across stone or something harder then the chain. Also...if you can find some worn out firehose, run the chain through that. The hose is sacrificial...also, should a link let go, the fire hose will reduce the snap back. If you live in an area that depends on volunteer fire fighters, getting old hose isn't difficult. 1" hose works great.

    Thanks, I like this idea. I guess I'm headed over to HF today to see what they have. <font color="black"> </font>

  8. #18
    Super Star Member IslandTractor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    18,549
    Location
    Prudence Island, RI
    Tractor
    2007 Kioti DK40se HST, Woods BH

    Default Re: Tow Chains

    Breaking a chain under load is a safety nightmare, but I wonder, in dragging or when transporting CUTs, just how often that happens. I came to the tractor owning world after many years as a boater. We use 5/16th chain to anchor 10-15 ton boats in storms where the wave action and wind put such severe forces (constant and momentary) on the chain that we need to put "snubber" lines (stretchy nylon) between the chain and boat so the chain doesn't pull the boat apart! Breaking chain is really really hard to do. The concerns about using "lower grade" chain in towing applications with the fear of breaking the chain when you make a sharp turn or hit a bump seem exaggerated when talking about transporting CUTs. Maybe if you ran into a bridge abutement the chain would break but I cannot imagine properly sized chain breaking due to the forces associated with trailering (short of the bridge abutement).

    I appreciate the issue of regulations making certain chain types manditory but at a practical level, if the chain has an appropriate load rating, does grade make any difference?

  9. #19
    Elite Member
    Parts Supplier
    MessickFarmEqu's Avatar
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    Feb 2004
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    5,180
    Location
    Lancaster County, PA

    Default Re: Tow Chains

    you guys would probably like these...

    http://www.messicks.com/hdept16/Tow/Rope.aspx

    you should see the monster 100,000 lb rops - perfect for docking your cruise ship!

  10. #20
    Veteran Member
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    Jul 2003
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    1,680
    Location
    SW Indiana
    Tractor
    Ford 1920 4x4 (traded in on Kubota). Case 480F TLB w/4 in 1 bucket, 4x4. Gehl CTL60 tracked loader, Kubota L4330 GST

    Default Re: Tow Chains

    &lt;/font&gt;<font color="blueclass=small">( Breaking a chain under load is a safety nightmare, but I wonder, in dragging or when transporting CUTs, just how often that happens.)&lt;/font&gt;

    I've wondered that too but on related threads, a lot of posters have reported it. I suspect most chains that break were damaged sometime along the way by improper rigging. Its easy to do.

    My other gut opinion is that there is no end to the shortcuts a company can take if forced to compete solely on price. Yeah, it still looks like a chain (or whatever) but does that company use modern quality assurance programs, certified materials, etc. Is their plating specification "plate until shiny" or do they take steps to control hydrogen embrittlement? Proper heat treatment is also a science-not just throw it in and check it with a file. Is there any reason to think the distributor is more careful where they source some items if they have a reputation for selling poor quality on other things? I suspect that old line chain manufacturers do all this or they would have been sued out of existence by now. Thats worth an extra 10 bucks to me.

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