Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19
  1. #11
    Gold Member TwinWillows's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    413
    Location
    WKY near Bardwell
    Tractor
    NH TC40DA

    Default Re: When good hydraulics go bad...

    Thanks for the info - I can picture that working to hold the cylinder from turning!

    Isn't it a pain to try & loosen too tight shop torqued bolts @ home! Nothing like having to break out the breaker bar to crack loose a bolt. I sometimes wonder how they get them so tight & don't strip out/off. That'd be my luck.

  2. #12
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    157
    Location
    Eastern suburbs of Pittsburgh
    Tractor
    '03 L3130, '06 BX24, '11 RTV1100

    Default Re: When good hydraulics go bad...

    john,

    Do either of the online sites allow you to order a seal kit for a specific cylinder on a specific tractor or hoe?
    In the short time I was on the sites, it looked like you had to order each seal individually and as a newbie to repacking, I'm not able to identify which seals would be needed.

    One other question. Can you repack a cylinder without the need of a manual or special tools? I mean is it just as simple as sliding the seals on in the reverse order they came off and retightening the gland nut?

    Thanks for the pics and the info. I just have to learn how to repack these because the dealer quoted me $200 to repack a cylinder and $400 for a valve. Whoa! From what I'm seeing from your post, I'm in the wrong business!!

    Thanks,
    Jim

  3. #13
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    157
    Location
    Eastern suburbs of Pittsburgh
    Tractor
    '03 L3130, '06 BX24, '11 RTV1100

    Default Re: When good hydraulics go bad...

    john,

    Do either of the online sites allow you to order a seal kit for a specific cylinder on a specific tractor or hoe?
    In the short time I was on the sites, it looked like you had to order each seal individually and as a newbie to repacking, I'm not able to identify which seals would be needed.

    One other question. Can you repack a cylinder without the need of a manual or special tools? I mean is it just as simple as sliding the seals on in the reverse order they came off and retightening the gland nut?

    Thanks for the pics and the info. I just have to learn how to repack these because the dealer quoted me $200 to repack a cylinder and $400 for a valve. Whoa! From what I'm seeing from your post, I'm in the wrong business!!

    Thanks,
    Jim

  4. #14
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    6,595

    Default Re: When good hydraulics go bad...

    Jim,

    Baum has some full kits listed in the catalog. Sections "X" and "Y". IF you tell me the tractor, loader/hoe and cylinder diameter I can look in the book for you. (Always best to double check that it is right with a call to the company when you order!)

    You can pretty easily order the parts. BUT you need to take it apart first and measure. Then just match up what you have. H&D has pictures of the parts and that helps a LOT.


    The only special tool is a big honking bar to get more leverage. Gland nut specs are in the 300-400ft-lb range and piston nut specs are in the 5-600 range. A spanner wrench may be needed to open it up and a high quality 1/2" impact or 3/4" impact. Piston nut needed a 1 - 7/8" socket. Oh, a ring compressor that is used to compress the rings on a engine's piston when you put it in will be a big help in sliding the parts back together. They are cheap at NAPA and the like.

    jb

  5. #15
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    6,595

    Default Re: When good hydraulics go bad...

    Jim,

    Baum has some full kits listed in the catalog. Sections "X" and "Y". IF you tell me the tractor, loader/hoe and cylinder diameter I can look in the book for you. (Always best to double check that it is right with a call to the company when you order!)

    You can pretty easily order the parts. BUT you need to take it apart first and measure. Then just match up what you have. H&D has pictures of the parts and that helps a LOT.


    The only special tool is a big honking bar to get more leverage. Gland nut specs are in the 300-400ft-lb range and piston nut specs are in the 5-600 range. A spanner wrench may be needed to open it up and a high quality 1/2" impact or 3/4" impact. Piston nut needed a 1 - 7/8" socket. Oh, a ring compressor that is used to compress the rings on a engine's piston when you put it in will be a big help in sliding the parts back together. They are cheap at NAPA and the like.

    jb

  6. #16
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    157
    Location
    Eastern suburbs of Pittsburgh
    Tractor
    '03 L3130, '06 BX24, '11 RTV1100

    Default Re: When good hydraulics go bad...

    John,

    Thanks for the info and the offer to look up the kit # for me. The problem I have is that I won't be able to tear down the cylinder until I can actually do the job of resealing it. The job needs for the hoe are too great right now to have it being idle for several days. I've been living with the sagging cylinder for about a week now and although it's usable in that condition, it is a pain in the **you know where!** and I want to get it resealed as soon as I can.

    But, I can tell you...

    * The bad one is the dipper cylinder on a kubota BH90 backhoe
    * The hoe is on a Kub Grand L3130 tractor
    * It takes a spanner wrench with a 1/4" pin to remove the nut
    * The outside cylinder diameter is about 3"
    * The piston diameter appears to be about 1.5"

    The cheapest dealer wants about $56 for a seal kit and must order it. Only takes a couple of days.

    How does that price compare to others? I'm just wondering if it's worth the risk of getting the wrong parts by ordering elsewhere.

    Jim

  7. #17
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    157
    Location
    Eastern suburbs of Pittsburgh
    Tractor
    '03 L3130, '06 BX24, '11 RTV1100

    Default Re: When good hydraulics go bad...

    John,

    Thanks for the info and the offer to look up the kit # for me. The problem I have is that I won't be able to tear down the cylinder until I can actually do the job of resealing it. The job needs for the hoe are too great right now to have it being idle for several days. I've been living with the sagging cylinder for about a week now and although it's usable in that condition, it is a pain in the **you know where!** and I want to get it resealed as soon as I can.

    But, I can tell you...

    * The bad one is the dipper cylinder on a kubota BH90 backhoe
    * The hoe is on a Kub Grand L3130 tractor
    * It takes a spanner wrench with a 1/4" pin to remove the nut
    * The outside cylinder diameter is about 3"
    * The piston diameter appears to be about 1.5"

    The cheapest dealer wants about $56 for a seal kit and must order it. Only takes a couple of days.

    How does that price compare to others? I'm just wondering if it's worth the risk of getting the wrong parts by ordering elsewhere.

    Jim

  8. #18
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    6,595

    Default Re: When good hydraulics go bad...

    Jim,

    I know all about pains in the ***! *See my post on 4 speed rebuild....

    The cylinder is probably a 2.5 inch internal diameter (the one that counts). The ROD is 1.5". The piston is bolted to the bottom of the rod and is where the packing is located. Also packing at the top on the gland nut that keeps the fluid from leaking out onto the ground.

    You could probably get the parts and pieces for 2/3 to 1/2 the price, but I would probably just get it from kubota. Time saved is money saved and that will save some time. As far as risk, once you do a cylinder you will better see that there is really not much risk!

    You should also measure the distance between the pin holes and get a "pin spanner" that fits exactly or better an adjustable one. Found on ebay or tool places for about $40-50. You may also want to ask the kubota parts guy to tell you the size nut on the rod (inside the cylinder) so you can be sure you have a socket that size. My old books say to use a pull spring scale and a 6' bar to get the high torque readings. 50# pull by a 6' bar = 300 foot-lb torque. You should also have a piston ring compresser. I use the type that is ratchetable down. 10-15 bucks at NAPA and the like. That will help in getting the piston back without forcing. Use lots of clean hyd fluid to lube it on the way in. I use the same method as setting a hammer head on a handle. Start the rod/piston into the cylinder, then pick up the cylinder and drop the it 5-6" onto a chunk of wood. The rod will gently go down and the compressor will be stopped as it is too big. Sounds complex, but it's easy.

    If you are having trouble getting a sturdy place to apply the torque to undo the piston nut or gland nut, use the Back Hoe mounts.

    Whew ... I am wordy today!! (sorry)

    jb


  9. #19
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    6,595

    Default Re: When good hydraulics go bad...

    Jim,

    I know all about pains in the ***! *See my post on 4 speed rebuild....

    The cylinder is probably a 2.5 inch internal diameter (the one that counts). The ROD is 1.5". The piston is bolted to the bottom of the rod and is where the packing is located. Also packing at the top on the gland nut that keeps the fluid from leaking out onto the ground.

    You could probably get the parts and pieces for 2/3 to 1/2 the price, but I would probably just get it from kubota. Time saved is money saved and that will save some time. As far as risk, once you do a cylinder you will better see that there is really not much risk!

    You should also measure the distance between the pin holes and get a "pin spanner" that fits exactly or better an adjustable one. Found on ebay or tool places for about $40-50. You may also want to ask the kubota parts guy to tell you the size nut on the rod (inside the cylinder) so you can be sure you have a socket that size. My old books say to use a pull spring scale and a 6' bar to get the high torque readings. 50# pull by a 6' bar = 300 foot-lb torque. You should also have a piston ring compresser. I use the type that is ratchetable down. 10-15 bucks at NAPA and the like. That will help in getting the piston back without forcing. Use lots of clean hyd fluid to lube it on the way in. I use the same method as setting a hammer head on a handle. Start the rod/piston into the cylinder, then pick up the cylinder and drop the it 5-6" onto a chunk of wood. The rod will gently go down and the compressor will be stopped as it is too big. Sounds complex, but it's easy.

    If you are having trouble getting a sturdy place to apply the torque to undo the piston nut or gland nut, use the Back Hoe mounts.

    Whew ... I am wordy today!! (sorry)

    jb


Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2017 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.