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  1. #21
    Gold Member fgross335_2210's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    362
    Location
    West Michigan
    Tractor
    2210, 355D, 1950 Model B

    Default Re: Sea foam?

    I once used "GM Top Engine Cleaner" in my 98 Chevy Truck 5.7 V8. The directions say to slowly pour it in the throttle body with the engine running, then to start pouring a little faster until the engine stalls (or if you run out shut off the engine). Then let it sit 10-15 minutes and take it out for a hard run.

    I followed the procedure and it's just as you described - a lot of heavy smoke at first which clears up in 3-5 minutes (or after a few WOT blasts on the freeway). I did not set any codes or have any engine issues whatsoever.

    Previously my truck pinged heavily when towing my travel trailer, after the treatment all the pinging-causing carbon deposits were gone and my truck ran much better.

    GM also makes an aerosol version that you can spray in the cylinders via the spark plug holes.

    I agree, this stuff really works.
    Fred G
    2210/FEL/62C, 355D/54C

  2. #22
    Elite Member RalphVa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,791
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA, USA
    Tractor
    JD 1025, previously Gravely 5650 & JD 4010

    Default Re: Sea foam?

    After reading some raves about Sea Foam here, I bought some for the poor idling on my Gravely tractor. It made it idle smoothly.

    Tried it a couple times on my 1996 Toyota Tacoma with no noticeable effect. Turns out the hard hot start problem with the Tacoma was a bad air flow sensor ($300 item). New air flow sensor made it start immediately cold and after 2-3 revs hot.

    Ralph
    The natural gardener
    God's original intent

  3. #23
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    51
    Location
    Faribault MN
    Tractor
    JD 2305

    Default Re: Sea foam?

    I worked for a Auto Parts Store 30 years ago my father had been it the business for 25 years prior, and we sold the product by the case to all Services Station and Tune Up shops. Everyone that used it was sold on it. Like the others have said it's great for winter storage and cleaning carbs. Pour it down an idling engine carb for 1/3 can then kill the engine by flooding it out with it. Let it sit an hour or Start it the next spring. I recently talked to a service repair shop owner who was just a kid back then and took over his fathers shop and he said Sea Foam is still the best for storage. There may be other products that are just as good. But I do know that this is a good product. I suppose if it is not used on a regular basis it could dislodge bigger deposits and cause more problems. I haven't experienced that. We had lots of additives back then, most didn't work but we weren't afraid to recommend this product because it worked for so many. I have no affliation with the Sea Foam company what so ever. I'm a computer consultant now.
    TransMedic was another great additive for Auto transmissions back then. If you had a problem small or big put it in and try it. If it didn't fix it plan on overhauling it.
    Tom

  4. #24
    Platinum Member Ryan03's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    648
    Location
    Chardon Ohio
    Tractor
    Farmtrac DTC270, Kubota G5200hydro, Honda recon 250, Suzuki King Quad 450 4x4, 2003 2500 DMax/Allison 4x4

    Default Re: Sea foam?

    The only time that i created a problem using seafoam was on a 2002 cadilac deville northstar, the car had a slightly rough idle and the gentelman that owns it rarely goes over 35 or drives more than 6 or so miles at a time. I fed the seafoam into it just as i described in my last post, and all seemed normal until around halfway through my roadtest, the car would not get out of its own way, and would not idle at all. On a northstar, there is a short boot that runs between the intake manifold and the aluminum casting on the back of engine that the throtle body bolts to, most of this boot is not visible with the intake bolted to engine. As it turns out , the boot had a tear in it about 4 inches long on the very bottom and was almost completely sealed by about a half inch or so of sludge, that is until the seafoam dissolved 75% of the deposits and allowed a huge vacume leak to begin. replacing the boot requires r and r of the intake, so I was able to get a firsthand look at how much junk it cleaned out. Sometimes cleaning products can bring out other problems masked by crud { valve guides , rings, worn out throttle shafts, etc. but these are not the fault of the product}. By the way , once the boot {G.M. calls it a plenum} was replaced, I ran another can through it to get most of what was left out, and the car ran flawlessly. I am a true beleiver in the stuff.

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