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  1. #1
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    Default damaged backhoe stabilizing piston

    The other day I dropped, I mean some idiot dropped a rock on my stabilizing piston arm scratching the chromed area about 6" from the foot plate. TC24 with backhoe. No other damage other than a few gouges not to bad.
    Any ideas on the best way to repair

  2. #2
    Elite Member
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    Windham County, Conn
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    Ford 2120 , New Holland TN75D, Hitachi UH083LC Excavator

    Default Re: damaged backhoe stabilizing piston

    How bad are the scratches? If not too bad, I've sanded them out with emery cloth and run with them for years. It all depends if the seals leak. If you do sand them out, wipe off with a oily rag to mage sure you get all the grit and metal particles of the cylinder.

    If not, you'll either have to replace the cylinder or rod and rebuild the cylinder. It might be a good time to consider installing cylinder guards. I have them on my Woods 1050 and previously on my New Holland 758 and they got quite a few dents from stones with never any damage to cylinders.

    Andy

  3. #3
    Elite Member
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    Ford 2120 , New Holland TN75D, Hitachi UH083LC Excavator

    Default Re: damaged backhoe stabilizing piston

    BTW, the cylinder guads are pieces of channel iron that are about as long as the cylinder with have holes to be pinned to the lower cylinder pin. The upper end just lays on the cylinder and floats with it.

    Andy

  4. #4
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    Default Re: damaged backhoe stabilizing piston

    Thanks Should I sand them smooth or just so the rough edges are gone? They are not to deep.

  5. #5
    Super Member Bob_Skurka's Avatar
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    Default Re: damaged backhoe stabilizing piston

    Dan, I'm in total agreement with Andy. If the scratches are not leaking fluid, simple sanding (use emory paper or similar grit, 400 to 600 grit). If the scratches are deep enough that you are leaking fluid, you will want to remove the entire cylinder and take it to a hydraulic shop. They can swap out the piston and it will save you from having to buy an entire new cylinder.




    Snow Trac, the Swedish Snow Tractor, at Wikipedia
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: damaged backhoe stabilizing piston

    Thanks guys, sounds simple enough.

  7. #7
    Super Member Bob_Skurka's Avatar
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    Default Re: damaged backhoe stabilizing piston

    Quote Originally Posted by badge142
    Thanks guys, sounds simple enough.
    It's so simple Rico304 could even do it, if you give him enough time




    Snow Trac, the Swedish Snow Tractor, at Wikipedia
    Never insult a man with a bag of dog poop in one hand and a tennis racket in the other hand!

  8. #8
    Veteran Member hayden's Avatar
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    Kubota L5740 cab + FEL, Cat D5G dozer, Kubota KX121 excavtor

    Default Re: damaged backhoe stabilizing piston

    If you have gouges and they are causing leaks, you can fill them with JB Weld (or is it JD Weld?). I banged up a cylinder on my hoe a long time ago and the cylinger was leaking pretty bad as a result. Following a tip from TBN, I filled the gouges and smoothed off with emory cloth, and it's been working great ever since.

  9. #9
    Gold Member rico304's Avatar
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    Cumberland County, Maine
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    JD 4300 w/ FEL

    Default Re: damaged backhoe stabilizing piston

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob_Skurka
    It's so simple Rico304 could even do it, if you give him enough time
    Wow, it must be a pretty uncomplicated job! Thanks so much Bob. I feel really good about myself now :-)
    "A government which robs Peter to pay Paul can always count on the support of Paul"....
    George Bernard Shaw

  10. #10
    Super Star Member EddieWalker's Avatar
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    Default Re: damaged backhoe stabilizing piston

    Sanding will take off the high spots, but it will also take off some areas you don't want removed. When you sand, you will give a perfectly round rod flat spots.

    Instead of sanding, use a fine file. Just take off the high parts and ignore the lowspots. Take your time and keep the file flat to the surface of the cylinder rod. There will be some pits, or depressions from the damage that will remain. Leave them alone. Short of welding and machining, they are just something you'll come to live with.

    The seals on your gland that the cylinder rod slides through are wide enough that there shouldn't be any leakage. The only time you could possible have leakage is when the pitted area passes throught the seals inside your gland. If it did leak, it would only be a drop or two.

    Sanding away too much will cause you much more problems than leaving the pits in the cylinder. The unround shape will cause wear on your seals and lead to them wearing out sooner than they should.

    Eddie

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