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  1. #1
    Elite Member sandman2234's Avatar
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    JD2555

    Default Ford 7710 clutch replacement

    I just found out that the 7710 I have been trying to purchase for the last couple of months will need a clutch, which is what took it out of sevice. I am lucky to have a friend who works there and lets me know these things as they are disclosed.
    Does anyone have a ballpark idea of what it would cost to put a clutch in it, and maybe what type of tools I would need should I decide to split the tractor myself?
    I could use a ballpark answer if no one has acess to an actual cost.
    Anyone recently put a clutch in a 100 hp tractor? How much did it cost and did you do it yourself?
    I am more inclined at this point to want a price on what it will cost to have someone replace it, due to it affecting the value of the tractor.
    Thanks, David from jax

  2. #2
    Super Member Farmwithjunk's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ford 7710 clutch replacement

    Quote Originally Posted by sandman2234
    I just found out that the 7710 I have been trying to purchase for the last couple of months will need a clutch, which is what took it out of sevice. I am lucky to have a friend who works there and lets me know these things as they are disclosed.
    Does anyone have a ballpark idea of what it would cost to put a clutch in it, and maybe what type of tools I would need should I decide to split the tractor myself?
    I could use a ballpark answer if no one has acess to an actual cost.
    Anyone recently put a clutch in a 100 hp tractor? How much did it cost and did you do it yourself?
    I am more inclined at this point to want a price on what it will cost to have someone replace it, due to it affecting the value of the tractor.
    Thanks, David from jax
    To do the work yourself, you'll need "splitting stands" or some configuration of jacks, jack stands, hoist's, and blocking to SAFELY handle 2 halves of a tractor. You'll need the correct alignment tool to re-install the new clutch, as well as all the hand tools to bolt and unbolt everything. Generally, just about every tractor ever built will require a few odd "special tools" to set and/or install clutch parts on that particular model. I'm sure the 7710 is no different. Usually those special tools can be worked around somehow, but at the sacrifice of speed and accuracy.

    Then there's the manuals. You BETTER have a SERVICE manual (at the very least)

    A friend recently had a clutch put in an 8000 Ford (@ New Holland dealer) . He had a few other minor details attended to while the work was going on. Bill was close to $2000. Not sure exactly how much was the clutch job, but it was MOST of that I'm sure.
    There are three kinds of men;
    1.) The ones that learn by reading
    2.) The few who learn by observation
    3.) The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.

  3. #3
    Elite Member sandman2234's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ford 7710 clutch replacement

    Thanks FWJ,
    I called the local Ford/New Holland dealer this morning and they quoted me anywhere from 700 to 1800 for the parts, and 21 hours of labor at $75 an hour to redo it, using somewhat "worse case scenerio". I would rather find out that it didn't cost me that much, than it costs more than my estimate, although a little either way isn't going to make a difference. Another shop here in town that I have never used, but very much like the people that work there, as I buy incidentals from them, such as pins and things quoted me $1200 but I am not sure if that included the parts, thinking back on the way the conversation went. He will probably pick the tractor up for me and bring it to my house (or his shop) due to the reasonable price he set on moving it.
    Thanks again, David from jax

  4. #4
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ford 7710 clutch replacement

    That parts # sounds about right.. depending on if you need extra's.. like a new flywheel.. or a resurfacing.. etc.. etc. I was looking up parts for a similar tractor mind you.. but was close enough for balpark. The labor is what gets you as you can see. Also.. as has been pointed out here and ,in my PM, I said if you split it yerself.. have the big cribbing ready.. Also.. as a tip.. for most ford manual trannies.. you can remove the tranny input shaft and use it as an alignment tool. just get a new seal/gasket.. etc.. which is recomended anyway if you have her split..

    soundguy

  5. #5
    Super Member RickB's Avatar
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    Eastern NY
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    Case 885, Ford 4000

    Default Re: Ford 7710 clutch replacement

    An inexperienced mechanic should not remove the input to a dual power transmsion unless he wished to become an experienced mechanic. A quality clutch job should include 3 new expansion plugs at the back of the motor, a new rear main seal, and a hard look at the splines on the PTO driveshaft and hub. A rear (double) split is required to swap out a PTO driveshaft with severely worn splines.

  6. #6
    Elite Member sandman2234's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ford 7710 clutch replacement

    Should I have to do this clutch job, and decide to do it myself, with a friend helping, I will start by building a couple of stands that will bolt onto the tractor in places such as the side of the engine and the side of the tranny. My idea would be kind of an "A" frame arrangement with tabs sticking up to run alongside those items. Rollers (4) on each should allow it to move without tipping. Something along the line of all-thread to keep the halves aligned and hopefully no accidents. I would probably take the measurements from the input shaft and turn something up in the lathe to make an alignment tool, unless one can be purchased or borrowed/rented for less than about $20. I may give the flywheel a whirl, or send it to the shop next door to where I worked for several years. They had a resurfacing machine, which would probably do a better job than my mill.
    The part that worries me most is knowing what has to come apart, where it comes apart and in what sequence it goes back together again. Guess I just take everything that crosses the bellhousing line apart and put it back in in the reverse order I removed it. A few pictures along the way to jog my memory as I will probably be on and off the job over a period of time.
    I thought I had a shop manual for this tractor, but turns out it is for a smaller one (2310 2610 2810 2910 3610 3910 4110 4610 230a 234 334 335 530a 1981/2-90). Just thought I would mention that in case somebody else needs one. I may ebay it since I don't forsee needing it. Hopefully they still have the shop manual for this tractor and are willing to let me have it. They did give me all the manuals for my JD2555 so I am hopeful of the same treatment with this one, however most of the people and the way they handled this sale has changed since the way of the JD, I may find out different.
    David from jax

  7. #7
    Super Member Robert_in_NY's Avatar
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    Case-IH Farmall 45A, Kubota M8540 Narrow, New Holland TN 65, Bobcat 331, Ford 1920, 1952 John Deere M, Allis Chalmers B, Bombardier Traxter XT, Massey Harris 81RC and a John Deere 3300 combine, Cub Cadet GT1554

    Default Re: Ford 7710 clutch replacement

    Rick does know what he is talking about so if he suggest taking it to someone with experience I would ask around to see who in your area is good at working with these trannys and decide from there. I know I would just take it to my New Holland dealer because they have the proper tools and shop to do the work on this size tractor. I can probably do it but I need to rely on my 7710 during the summer and I do not want to learn how to repair this tranny during my busy season. The only thing worse than having to split a tractor is having to split it again because you didn't do something right the first time.At the very least I would be good friends with the Ford/NH dealer before trying to do this. I know my NH mechanics and they will take the time to help me out and explain things if I am having trouble. Plus they let me borrow some of the tools from the shop if I need to :-)


    God must love stupid people; He made so many

  8. #8
    Super Member Farmwithjunk's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ford 7710 clutch replacement

    From the beginning of this thread, I've been fighting off the urge to throw a wet blanket on the fire, but here goes....

    Splitting a tractor is a real job, even with proper equipment and a little experience. The first one is an experience you don't forget. There's more things you can do wrong, un-neccessarily, or in reverse order than you can ever imagine. Some of the things that can go wrong involve DROPPING 1/2 a tractor. Even with splitting stands, you've got a heavy, awkward chunk of iron to pull apart. A better "first timer" would be a smaller, lighter tractor IMHO. You're looking at an expensive labor charge for a job that's worth every penny it will cost.

    I've split 8 tractors in my lifetime. I've got 2 in line to be restored that need clutches. I almost always do all of my own wrenching. I'm paying someone to put in the clutches. I won't miss doing it myself one slight bit.
    There are three kinds of men;
    1.) The ones that learn by reading
    2.) The few who learn by observation
    3.) The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.

  9. #9
    Gold Member
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    Default Re: Ford 7710 clutch replacement

    Have not split a tractor this size,from experience with smaller tractors
    (Fordson PM) I would suggest the following.
    Consult a workshop manual if possible or some one with experience.
    Construct or borrow a suitable trolley or floor jack to wheel engine forward.
    Place a jack under the drawbar as well as the front of the transmission.
    Wedge front of engine so it cannot move on the axle pivot.
    Check that there is nothing inside the clutch housing that needs undoing,
    (M-F65MP has hydraulic lines inside).Remove all neccessary bolts etc.
    Find out what alignment tools are needed(make or borrow).Insulation tape
    wrapped around a length of rod will sometimes work.
    Guild bolts can make reassembly easier.
    Have suitable blocks, stands,and an extra jack on hand.

  10. #10
    Super Member
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    Default Re: Ford 7710 clutch replacement

    I tend to agree with Farmwithjunk. That is a LARGE tractor and about 3x the trouble of a small (hundred series, early thousand) tractor.

    BUT, 21 hours at $75 is a bundle of dough.

    If you are handy with fabrication of stuff out of steel, I would suggest building a splitting trolly, probably a couple hundred bucks in materials and stuff. If you can get 2x3 tubing and make bolt on side rails on one half and 3x4 on the other side that will slide inside each other, it should help out a lot. However, you will have more than a ton of angry metal on each side of you just waiting to crush you like a bug. Never forget that. Stout jack stands and roll around floor jacks and engine hoists or chain fall on an "I" beam should be used along with your trolly.

    If you are going to go for it, make sure you have all the sockets, wrenches, torch, penetrating fluids, hammers and things that will be needed. On a big job, I like to start with the penetrating oil a week in advance (Kroil or the stuff GM sells as Heat Pipe Lubricant).

    jb

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