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  1. #231
    Veteran Member RDrancher's Avatar
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    Default Re: RDrancher's Photo Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by ben2go View Post
    I would like to ask a question.If I am out of line,please let me know and we can chat in PM.

    In a few years I am planning to build a 30x40 garage.The drive way up is fairly steep grade.From the road to the front of the shop,the vertical rise is 15 feet over a 90 foot run.I will be bringing vehicles in and out with a GVWR of no more than 30,000lbs.What would you suggest for the drive way,pavement or rebar reenforced concrete?What should the thickness be?My building slab will be 6 inch rebar reenforced concrete.The reason I ask is,at my house the driveway pavement mars every time I jack a vehicle up.Heck,my porch swing even marred up in the pavement.
    Ben, if the cost doesn't deter you, I'd opt for concrete, mainly because of the slope. Even though 4" thickness will handle the weight, if you have them pour at 5" you can spec "4 rebar for reinforcement. A lot of guys will place #4 rebar in 4" concrete, but its too large and if it's set on rebar chairs its too high in the slab and can lead to premature surface cracks. Sometimes bigger isn't better.

    I like to thicken up the perimeter of the slab for extra strength. On a slope, the extra depth can also help to keep water from getting under the concrete and forming voids. At the bottom of the slope, the little footing helps to stabilize the slab. 6-7" around the perimeter is plenty...thicker can lead to settling and crack the slab down the middle. I'd also go with fibermesh, it's fairly inexpensive and really does help keep micro-cracks at bay. There are plenty of admixtures to choose from...water reducers increase strength by making the concrete more workable at a lower slump and air-entrainment helps in the freeze-thaw cycle. Finally, make sure the contractor places 3/4-1" deep tooled joints at no more than10' intervals to control random cracking and then applies a semi-heavy broom or textured trowel finish to give you plenty of traction.
    John

    My Work & Stuff Photo Thread: http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/p...to-thread.html

    Reshaping the world...One bucket-load at a time.

  2. #232
    Silver Member ben2go's Avatar
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    Upstate, South Carolina,USA

    Default Re: RDrancher's Photo Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by RDrancher View Post
    Ben, if the cost doesn't deter you, I'd opt for concrete, mainly because of the slope. Even though 4" thickness will handle the weight, if you have them pour at 5" you can spec "4 rebar for reinforcement. A lot of guys will place #4 rebar in 4" concrete, but its too large and if it's set on rebar chairs its too high in the slab and can lead to premature surface cracks. Sometimes bigger isn't better.

    I like to thicken up the perimeter of the slab for extra strength. On a slope, the extra depth can also help to keep water from getting under the concrete and forming voids. At the bottom of the slope, the little footing helps to stabilize the slab. 6-7" around the perimeter is plenty...thicker can lead to settling and crack the slab down the middle. I'd also go with fibermesh, it's fairly inexpensive and really does help keep micro-cracks at bay. There are plenty of admixtures to choose from...water reducers increase strength by making the concrete more workable at a lower slump and air-entrainment helps in the freeze-thaw cycle. Finally, make sure the contractor places 3/4-1" deep tooled joints at no more than10' intervals to control random cracking and then applies a semi-heavy broom or textured trowel finish to give you plenty of traction.
    Thanks.That is very helpful.Should I consider french drains down the sides of the driveway?The ground slopes toward the driveway.The lawn absorbs most of the water and there's very little run off except during periods of extended rain storms or heavy rain.I don't cut the grass short in this area.About 2 inches is how I keep the grass.

  3. #233
    Veteran Member RDrancher's Avatar
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    Default Re: RDrancher's Photo Thread

    A french drain will catch underground water, which may help (up to a point) during rain storms. At least it would keep down the saturation level. I would also add a few T's with atrium drain heads connected to the same pipe to catch surface water. If you do put in a FD, I'd use 4" corex type perforated pipe and install a 90 with a cleanout fitting at the uphill end too. I detest the flexible corrugated pipe, especially the pre-wrapped stuff. To me it screams "EL-CHEAPO CUT CORNERS CONTRACTOR." I've removed too much of it over the years, crushed, plugged, incorrectly installed and just plain not working. I wouldn't use it if they gave it to me for free!

    You could also create a slight swale to help catch runoff, but without seeing it I don't know if it would cause a problem at the exit or not.
    John

    My Work & Stuff Photo Thread: http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/p...to-thread.html

    Reshaping the world...One bucket-load at a time.

  4. #234
    Silver Member ben2go's Avatar
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    Default Re: RDrancher's Photo Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by RDrancher View Post
    A french drain will catch underground water, which may help (up to a point) during rain storms. At least it would keep down the saturation level. I would also add a few T's with atrium drain heads connected to the same pipe to catch surface water. If you do put in a FD, I'd use 4" corex type perforated pipe and install a 90 with a cleanout fitting at the uphill end too. I detest the flexible corrugated pipe, especially the pre-wrapped stuff. To me it screams "EL-CHEAPO CUT CORNERS CONTRACTOR." I've removed too much of it over the years, crushed, plugged, incorrectly installed and just plain not working. I wouldn't use it if they gave it to me for free!

    You could also create a slight swale to help catch runoff, but without seeing it I don't know if it would cause a problem at the exit or not.
    Thanks.I will make notes for when it's time to pour.I am dealing with collapsed perforated corrugated pipe now.I have a thread about my septic system issues.I'll be updating that thread shortly.

  5. #235
    Veteran Member RDrancher's Avatar
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    Default Re: RDrancher's Photo Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by ben2go View Post
    Thanks.I will make notes for when it's time to pour.I am dealing with collapsed perforated corrugated pipe now.I have a thread about my septic system issues.I'll be updating that thread shortly.
    Could you post a link to your thread so I can check it out?

    Graded and graveled a driveway today. I'll be back to compact it along with a few others nearby. I can offer better pricing to the customers that way.

    RDrancher's Photo Thread-plover01.jpg RDrancher's Photo Thread-plover02.jpg
    John

    My Work & Stuff Photo Thread: http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/p...to-thread.html

    Reshaping the world...One bucket-load at a time.

  6. #236
    Silver Member ben2go's Avatar
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    Default Re: RDrancher's Photo Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by RDrancher View Post
    Could you post a link to your thread so I can check it out?

    Graded and graveled a driveway today. I'll be back to compact it along with a few others nearby. I can offer better pricing to the customers that way.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I haven't started the project it's about a year out,if things don't break down.My leech field issue is here. Leech Field Collapse-Repair Help - Page 5

  7. #237
    Veteran Member RDrancher's Avatar
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    Default Re: RDrancher's Photo Thread

    After failing to duck low enough while walking between my truck and GN trailer yesterday afternoon...which resulting in me smacking my melon against it and landing on my back in the parking lot at my local fuel stop...I decided to take it a little easy today. I feel like I got hit by a...trailer.

    I noticed last evening that I had once again cracked the bucket. It probably didn't help that the bolt on the cutting edge was loose. I'm not a welder by any standards, but I get it done and it holds. I also developed a leak earlier in the day at one of the loader quick connects.
    RDrancher's Photo Thread-repair01.jpg RDrancher's Photo Thread-repair02.jpg RDrancher's Photo Thread-repair03.jpg

    I was given these gloves by a friend. I can't really recommend them. I wore out the leather fingertips by the end of the second day. Oh, that...and they caught on fire while I was grinding off the nuts on the cutting edge plow bolts.
    RDrancher's Photo Thread-repair04.jpg

    My boy checking out a Mahindra at the NH dealer. Pretty cool little machine!
    RDrancher's Photo Thread-dalton-tractor01.jpg

    I hadn't seen this monster around here before, so I thought I'd stop and take a couple of pics.
    RDrancher's Photo Thread-driller01.jpg RDrancher's Photo Thread-driller02.jpg
    John

    My Work & Stuff Photo Thread: http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/p...to-thread.html

    Reshaping the world...One bucket-load at a time.

  8. #238
    LJH
    LJH is offline
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    Default Re: RDrancher's Photo Thread

    You broke that bucket with you head too, admit it!

    And hey, didn't you promise us some GoPro action by this month? C'mon, it's only money, you'll get more.

  9. #239
    Silver Member ben2go's Avatar
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    Default Re: RDrancher's Photo Thread

    That Mahindra pic is front page material.

  10. #240
    LJH
    LJH is offline
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    Default Re: RDrancher's Photo Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by ben2go View Post
    That Mahindra pic is front page material.
    True. The kid looks right natural up there, don't he?

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