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  1. #1
    Elite Member Cliff_Johns's Avatar
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    Default Before and after pour


    Here is the excavation before my workshop/garage concrete pour.
    Cliff
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  2. #2
    Elite Member Cliff_Johns's Avatar
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    Default Re: Before and after pour


    Here it is after the pour
    Cliff
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  3. #3

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    Default Re: Before and after pour

    Cliff... nice looking slab, as far as slabs go.... LOL.... [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] Suggestion from experiance... Get a masonry blade and cut a saw kerf along the top edge where the slab starts to drop. This cut should be about 3/4" ~ 1" deep. The building will be warmer than the apron and this will cause cracking. You want the cracking to be along the saw kerf, not some where else. When I had my garage floor poured, the concrete contractor suggested to pour the apron at the same time. I wanted to do it at another time and he agreed. Part way through the pour, we ran out of concrete and had to get another delivery of the minimum yardage. We had concrete left over and he said, that rather than waste the concrete by leaving it on the truck we should pour the apron. I reluctantly agreed and we put in additional wire and re rod from the floor to the apron. We also put in a grooved "joint" that it was supposed to crack on if it cracked. That groove is about 1/2" wide and deep. This winter, I notice that it was cracking, but not where it was supposed to. This is after 3 winters!! That is why I suggest the deep cut along the top side of the apron. I poured the other aprons after the floor, so there is a joint and none of them has cracked where they meet the floor. I do have them pinned with rerod to the slab, so they can't drop or pull away. I do have one crack in one apron, because the person that I was working with, who was a concrete worker, said that crack line joints weren't necessary. That large apron, 6' x 30' has a crack in the middle from the front to the rear, exactly where I wanted to put a joint. Now I don't let others talk me out of doing what I know is wrong, just because they are helping me with the job.

  4. #4
    Elite Member Cliff_Johns's Avatar
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    Default Re: Before and after pour

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( . . . Get a masonry blade and cut a saw kerf along the top edge where the slab starts to drop. This cut should be about 3/4" ~ 1" deep. The building will be warmer than the apron and this will cause cracking. You want the cracking to be along the saw kerf, not some where else. . . . )</font>

    If you mean where the apron meets the slab proper, there is a score there which you may be able to see better in this enlarged version. If that's not where you mean, then help me figure it out because I'd like to do it right.

    Cliff
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  5. #5

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    Default Re: Before and after pour

    That is where I was referring to..... I would still put a score in with a masonry blade. This will set the crack in motion when it happens. It is for certain that it will crack sometime in the future unless there is a complete physical break, so they both can move independently in the cold weather. Cutting while the concrete is green is quick and easy. I tried to take a picture of the crack in my apron, but it didn't come out well with just the flash for light. In the morning I will try again, that is, if I don't have a senior moment and forget. A mind is a terrible thing to misplace.

  6. #6
    Elite Member GerardC's Avatar
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    Default Re: Before and after pour

    Looking good. Keep the tutorial and photos coming from your project. Always nice to see something come together. G

  7. #7
    Veteran Member DAP's Avatar
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    Default Re: Before and after pour

    Junk .. I know a lot about a few things .. a lil about many things, but not a thing about the art of concrete.

    Come over. I have a small pointing project I will undoubtedly make a hilarious mess of. Bring your grout bag too. These are not easy to find I'm discovering. I'm thinking I might try and fashion one out of a garbage bag and an old funnel or sumpin.

    Anti cracking cuts to intercept settling cracks? Whodathunkit.



  8. #8

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    Default Re: Before and after pour

    Here is the picture that I forgot to post yesterday.... [img]/forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif[/img]
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  9. #9
    Elite Member Cliff_Johns's Avatar
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    Default Re: Before and after pour


    Interesting picture. Seems like that's exactly what's not supposed to happen. Makes you wonder why it didn't crack along the cut line.

    Cliff

  10. #10

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    Default Re: Before and after pour

    My bet is that it is because the depth of the concrete. The floor was poured 4" thick in the center and 6" at the doors. The apron is probably about 6" thick where it cracked. The concrete is 4000 pound mix with the fiberglass reinforced. There is steel wire mesh in bedded and 3/4" re-rod going from the floor into the apron slab. I am certain that it isn't going to come apart, but the crack will continue to break apart at the top surface when water gets into the crack and freezes this winter. I am thinking of chipping it open and filling with a fast setting cement mix, but not certain if even that will prevent further deterioration of the crack.

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