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  1. #1
    Veteran Member Charlie_Iliff's Avatar
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    Arnold, MD
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    Power Trac PT1845, John Deere 2240, John Deere 950, John Deere 755, Jacobsen Turf Cat II

    Default PT 1845 Overheating

    Those reading the blade test thread know that both Sedgeqood and I have had some engine overheating during heavy mowing at hot outside temperatures. There was discussion in that thread about the increased load if four blades per spindle contributing to the problem, which it seems to do, I think both by increased load and by blowing more clippings and dust into the air. With only two blades per spindle, I've never overheated mine, but have had the temperature start to climb, after which I have found at least some dust and debris on the oil cooler. For a while, now, I have blown out the engine oil cooler after each session.
    Today, I duct taped some screen over the expanded metal in the engiine cover. After 15 minutes of mowing, the attachment shows what stuck to the screen opposite the engine fan. Without the screen, part or all of that would have stuck in the oil cooler, as would some that fell off the screen while I went to get the camera.
    Tomorrow's supposed to be over 90. It will be a good test day to see if the screen by itself causes overheating.
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  2. #2
    Epic Contributor MossRoad's Avatar
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    Aug 2001
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    24,047
    Location
    South Bend, Indiana (near)
    Tractor
    Power Trac PT425 2001 Model Year

    Default Re: PT 1845 Overheating

    Wow, that's a tough decision. The screen could block quite a bit of airflow, but since it is spread out over such a large area it might stop more debris in the cooler which might be causing more overheating ... That made no sense [img]/w3tcompact/icons/tongue.gif[/img]

    My guess is that the debris in the oil cooler probably causes more harm than the amount of airflow that you are going to lose with the screen. (that sounds better) [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    Let us know what you find.

  3. #3
    Platinum Member marrt's Avatar
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    Mar 2002
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    552
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    Northern VA
    Tractor
    Power Trac 1845

    Default Re: PT 1845 Overheating

    Charlie,

    Where is the oil cooler located? Is it behind the fan? Would you mind taking a few pictures of the engine compartment in general and the oil cooler specifically? Is it possible to add an auxiliary fan (I think the Deutz has a powerful alternator that could easily run an auxiliary fan)? Not sure if this would help though. What about an auxiliary oil cooler with fan? The Deutz is oil cooled, not ail cooled, right?

    Also, out of pure curiosity, where is the engine manufactured? I know that Deutz is a German company. Is the engine made in Germany?

  4. #4
    Gold Member
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    Mar 2002
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    300
    Tractor
    Toro 266H and PT422

    Default Re: PT 1845 Overheating

    Charlie,

    I've read posts where the other tractor brands have had issues with debris clogging the radiators and causing over heating. Imagine how much work your engine air cleaner is doing. Some type of self cleaning screen would be nice.

    Duane

  5. #5
    Platinum Member wasabi's Avatar
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    Mar 2002
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    717
    Location
    Cullowhee Mountain, NC
    Tractor
    PT2445 and PT1850

    Default Re: PT 1845 Overheating

    Charlie,

    While I haven't experienced significant overheating of the 45hp diesel in my PT 2445 (also don't yet have a mower), it strikes me that a separate oil cooler, similar to the one used to cool down the hydraulic oil, could easily enough be routed in to the existing engine oil loop, perhaps between the existing cooler and the return fitting on engine.

    I can't quite tell by looking at your configuration, but would guess that such a unit (basically a small radiator and fan), could be mounted along the top of your rear compartment to blow back so as to help blow debris away instead of attracting it. I doubt the small draw of a 12 volt fan would pose a problem for the alternator.

    Oil cooler units are available in various sizes...and I can't see why it would matter what brand. Unlike the hydraulic system, where any impedence of the oil pressure might impair performance, I think the only factor here might be the need to add oil volume to make up for that in the new cooler loop.

    What do you you guys think?

  6. #6
    Veteran Member Charlie_Iliff's Avatar
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    Power Trac PT1845, John Deere 2240, John Deere 950, John Deere 755, Jacobsen Turf Cat II

    Default Re: PT 1845 Overheating

    Mossroad, Marrt & Wasabi: Your posts echo my thought processes. After today's tests, it's time to get to Power Trac and work on modifications.
    The fan sucks air from the expanded metal back of the cover. The oil cooler iis mounted horizontally beside the engine, so air goes forward into the chamber under the cooler, then up through the cooler. After it goes out the top, a baffle plate directs it out the left side.
    Today, with ambient ar 90, climbing to 91 as I ran, the gauge went slowly to 240, the alarm went off, and I pulled to idle. I noticed the hydraulic cooling fan wasn't running, which is a separate problem that I haven't yet solved.
    Attached is a picture of the mat of stuff on my screen.
    I am sure someone will be tempted to say my screen and the mat blockage caused the overheating. It did, but without the screen the same stuff would have plugged the cooler. Some screen design work is needeed, as is a supplemental cooler.
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  7. #7
    Veteran Member Charlie_Iliff's Avatar
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    Arnold, MD
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    Power Trac PT1845, John Deere 2240, John Deere 950, John Deere 755, Jacobsen Turf Cat II

    Default Re: PT 1845 Overheating

    Duane: The other tractors I've worked with all have screens in front of the radiators, which need periodic cleaning. On my old Jacobsen front mower, the intake is in the rear, like the PT, so it gets a lot of dust. It has a two stage filter, first coarse, then quite fine mesh. Of course, when those clog, it overheats 'til we clean them. The PT has no screen whatsoever, although it has a large air cleaner for the engine intake.
    Time for some engineering, but I havan't figured how to make it self cleaning. Any suggestions?

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Apr 2002
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    106
    Location
    Dripping Springs, TX
    Tractor
    PT-425

    Default Re: PT 1845 Overheating

    Charlie,

    Just a question on your picture there. Is that light standard with the machine or did you mount it yourself. I assume it is some warning light when reversing??

  9. #9
    Veteran Member Charlie_Iliff's Avatar
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    Arnold, MD
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    Power Trac PT1845, John Deere 2240, John Deere 950, John Deere 755, Jacobsen Turf Cat II

    Default Re: PT 1845 Overheating

    Chris: The rear light is a factory installation. I don't know how many models they offer it on. I bought the 1845 at the factory right after the price drop in January and it had some stuff on it which may now be options

  10. #10
    Veteran Member Charlie_Iliff's Avatar
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    Power Trac PT1845, John Deere 2240, John Deere 950, John Deere 755, Jacobsen Turf Cat II

    Default Re: PT 1845 Overheating

    Marrt:
    I don't know where the engine is actually assembled. I have been assuming that it is in Germany.
    The oil cooling system is obvoiously set up for differing applications, with a rubber intake adapter to mate to ducting or to stand alone with a snap in plastic grid to keep out small animals and hands and feet.
    I have sent a long e-mail to Terry Estep at PT explaining my test and suggesting that the machine needs both a filtration system and a supplemental cooler for a bit of excess capacity.
    I am hoping they take the suggestions as constructive and not just criticism of the machine. Most times I really like it, but yesterday was 96 degrees when I was working on the overheated engine. Unlike the true macho tractor types, I've never learned to like working on hot stuff in hot weather.

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