Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    781
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Tractor
    PT 1845, Bobcat A300, JD Trail Gator

    Default 1845 starting problem

    After mowing today I shut down the 1845 to clean the mower. When I tried to restart after cleaning the engine would not start.

    The battery checked out OK and the connections at the battery were clean. The fan would start up when I turned the ignition on but the starter did nothing when the key was turned to start.

    I started to trace the wiring to the starter and found a 50 AMP fuse in the dircuit to the starter solenoid. I pulled the fuse out and it was not blown but the contacts were a little dirty. I cleaned the contacts on the fuse and reinserted it and the engine started.

  2. #2
    Elite Member BobRip's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,144
    Location
    Powhatan Va.
    Tractor
    2000 Power Trac 422

    Default Re: 1845 starting problem

    Thanks for the description and fix for your problem. Where do you store your PT? Could moisture have gotten into the fuse holder, or is this just one of those things that occasionally happen?

    On my PT 422 I have replaced both of the fuse holders (20 amp). I think vibration loosenedd the connections inside the holders. They are insulation displacement type and I have seen problems with them in trailers.
    Bob Rip
    Tell me and I will hear.
    Show me and I will see.
    Let me do and I will learn.
    Let me fail and I will understand.

  3. #3
    Veteran Member Charlie_Iliff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    1,896
    Location
    Arnold, MD
    Tractor
    Power Trac PT1845, John Deere 2240, John Deere 950, John Deere 755, Jacobsen Turf Cat II

    Default Re: 1845 starting problem

    Bob:
    The contacts may have been the problem, but you may also have the dreaded "solenoid needs all 12 volts" problem. Mine often wouldn't start when hot. Finally, pursuant to advice on here (sorry, I don't remember whose.) I wired a Ford solenoid next to the starter - a solenoid to feed the solenoid. It's a long circuit from the battery, through the junction box & fuse, up to the starter switch and back to the solenoid. The Ford solenoid doesn't seem to mind, but it didn't have enough to pull the Deutz solenoid in, particularly if the hydraulic fan was running. It hasn't missed a lick since the installation.

  4. #4
    Elite Member BobRip's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,144
    Location
    Powhatan Va.
    Tractor
    2000 Power Trac 422

    Default Re: 1845 starting problem

    I saw this "solenoid needs 12 volts" on some cars and have added a relay to compensate. I think the solenoids were designed before all of the interlocks (seat, blades, gear, etc.) were required. Now with all of these devices there is much wire, connectors, and switches between the battery and the solenoid.

    These failures were definately the fuse holder. One was for the fan. When you wiggled the fuse holder it would start and stop. The other was running power and not starting.
    There is only one interlock fpr starting on the 422 (I think) it is the PTO. You cannot start if the PTO switch is on.
    Bob Rip
    Tell me and I will hear.
    Show me and I will see.
    Let me do and I will learn.
    Let me fail and I will understand.

  5. #5
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    781
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Tractor
    PT 1845, Bobcat A300, JD Trail Gator

    Default Re: 1845 starting problem

    Quote Originally Posted by BobRip
    Where do you store your PT? Could moisture have gotten into the fuse holder, or is this just one of those things that occasionally happen?
    I store it in a garage and the conditions were dry when this happened. As a result I discount the moisture theory.

    I think it was simply a problem of too much voltage drop across the contacts on the fuse with the result that the solenoid would not pull in.

    Charlie Iliff's explanation of the requirement for a full 12 volts seems to be the best fit for what happened.

  6. #6
    DHS
    DHS is offline
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    172
    Location
    Watertown, SD
    Tractor
    PT-422

    Default Re: 1845 starting problem

    Bob,

    Last month I had a bad battery cable. Actually, the positive post connector that clamps the starter cable was not making adequate contact. I removed the bolts clamping the cable and noticed the cable was badly corroded. The connection was good enough to indicate 12 volts at the starter end of the cable but not good enough to carry starter current.

    Dale

  7. #7
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    172
    Location
    Poconos, PA
    Tractor
    Power Trac 2425

    Default Re: 1845 starting problem

    I had the same problem with my 2425 and the fuseholder. If you gave it a good squeeze where it pricked the wire it would start up. Haven't had any problems since replacing it. Still haven't found the fuse going to the fan but have not had any problems with it either so leaving well enough alone.

    Jack

  8. #8
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    781
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Tractor
    PT 1845, Bobcat A300, JD Trail Gator

    Default Re: 1845 starting problem

    Some new information on the starting problem.

    It was getting worse and I started a more careful examination of wiring and connections. When I opened the wiring connection box in the engine compartment wires at the number one and two connectors, on the side that connects to the wiring harness to the instrument panel, broke off with just a light touch. The number one connection is the power supply to the instrument panel and all switches. The number two connection is the power from the ignition switch to the starter solenoid when the key is turned to start.

    It appears the problem was that the wires were cut a bit short and pulled very tight to connect to the connector block--with heat cool cycles gradually causing the wires to break. (I have to wonder if something like this could have caused the fire in Sedgewood's 1845?)

    The wires coming into the box are too short to re-strip and re-connect so I need to make some mods to get things working again.

    I will bypass connectors one and two on the connection block in the engine compartment as a work around for the short wires.

    Additionally, my intent is to install solenoids for the fan and starter solenoid circuit so that current to power these devices does not flow through the ignition switch. While I am at it I also plan to replace the 50 amp main power supply fuse and the 20 amp fan fuse with circuit breakers.

  9. #9
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    589
    Location
    Columbia Co, Eastern NY
    Tractor
    PT-1845

    Default Re: 1845 starting problem

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob999
    Some new information on the starting problem.

    <snip>

    It appears the problem was that the wires were cut a bit short and pulled very tight to connect to the connector block--with heat cool cycles gradually causing the wires to break. (I have to wonder if something like this could have caused the fire in Sedgewood's 1845?)

    <snip>
    Nope. I never figured out the cause of the fire and while it was probably electrical it wasn't the connections from the cable to the connector block. I took a look at a picture I have that shows them all intact after the fire.

    I've been having start problems too and found my main problem to be high resistance in the neutral safety switch or it's connections. I bypassed it and now I sometimes get a hesitation before the solenoid pulls in. I think a start relay would be a good idea in my system too.

    Sedgewood

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2013 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.