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  1. #11
    Veteran Member mikim's Avatar
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    Feb 2001
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    2,416
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    Paige Texas
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    NH TC45

    Default Re: Tractor Shed - Need Framing Ideas

    6 ft. clearance on either side between the trees.
    To the trunk or the drip line? If you put a building 6' from the trunk of an oak ... you're just asking it to drop large limbs on your roof. Whenever I look at a tree I picture the same tree under ground (root system) as is above ground. Oaks in Tx all have the same problem - be it live oak or post oak - the limbs rot from the inside out. Cover those roots that are feeding it - and I gotta figure you're going to cause some damage over time.
    Mike


  2. #12
    Super Star Member EddieWalker's Avatar
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    Tyler, Texas
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    Several, all used and abused.

    Default Re: Tractor Shed - Need Framing Ideas

    I like to use 2x6's on the top chords with 2x4's on all the other parts.

    Squeezing it between two oak trees might be ok, but it might also be an issue down the road. I truly hate to take out an old tree, and oaks are my very favorite of all the trees. If it was me, I wouldn't build between two trees.

    One problem is that you might very well kill them both with your building. I've had that happen, which really sucks. You go to allot of trouble to try and save the tree, and it dies on you anyway. Now your building is smaller then you wanted it to be, PLUS you have to deal with a dying tree that will fall apart on your building if you don't take it down in such a manner as to save the tree.

    Another problem with oaks is they drop branches. Oaks seem to drop really big and HEAVY branches about once a year. I don't know why, but my experience is that it happens fairly regularly. Odds are double with two trees that you will get a branch through your roof.

    My last concern about building close to any tree is what the roots will do to the foundation. If you plan on pouring concrete, will it stay in place 20 years from now with two trees right next to the building?

    If this is the only place that works for you to build this, then think about taking out the trees. It hurts to do so, but a year from now, you will have trouble remembering that they were even there. If you have too much attachment to the trees, then take out at least one of them.

    If one of those trees was removed, could you build wider? 16 feet is just enough to park in with no space for storage on either side. One thing that you will always want and need is more storage. There is nothing more frustrating then to spend thousands of dollars on a building then to realize it was too small before you even finish building it. An extra 4 feet wider won't cost you very much money, probably just a couple hundred dollars in lumber, but give you a tremendous amount of open space. Right now, at 16 ft, you will be crowded. 20 feet will give you some space. Of course, there is no such thing as too wide, but I think 20 feet is about the minimum for a workable shop to be functional. Mine is 24 feet wide and I really like that width. I also have a 12 foot lean too off the side for extra storage, and it's packed full of stuff.

    Length is something that you can always add to later on by extending the length of the walls and adding more trusses. If you have the space, go for as deep as you can afford. If it was about not having enough money to do it as big as possible, I would seriously consider waiting and saving another year.

    One year will give you time to plan it out to the smallest detail, prepair the area for building, and have enough cash to build it even bigger. If you have the money to build it bigger right now, then consider making it 30 plus feet deep. I know the tractor isn't that long, but when you add a bush hog to the back of your tractor, it's gonna take up allot more room. Taking off the implement just to park it in your shop will get real old, real fast. Figure 20 feet to fit the tractor with bush hog and have enough room to walk around it. Then you want to have storage room, or a workbench, so another ten feet works out pretty good. Mine is 30 feet deep and when I build my next shop, it will be deeper. At 30 feet, I can just do what I want in there, but I have to plan ahead of time what I'll be working on, and I can only do one project at a time. Right now I'm working on an old jeep. That's about all I can do in there, so anything else that comes up is either in the way of each other, or gets done outside.

    Eddie

    PS to Rob,

    Awesome pics and comentary!!! I really enjoyed reading it and seeing how quickly you got it done. Thanks for posting them, I'm feeling motivated to go build something!!!!!!

    Eddie

  3. #13
    Elite Member RobJ's Avatar
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    Spring, TX (Houston)
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    Kubota L2500

    Default Re: Tractor Shed - Need Framing Ideas

    Eddie, thought you've seen the whole thing before.. Elkhart House Project

    I did build another fence this weekend..to hide some tractor junk. I need to update it.


    Regarding the oaks, and other trees, down here the problem roots are just under the ground to 2' down or so. Companies trench down about 2 feet, slip in a blocker of some kind, plastic I've seen, then cover it up. The roots are cut of course. I haven't heard of this killing a lot of trees so I guess they still do it. Under a oak sure makes a nice place to work on something in the summer!!
    L2500

  4. #14
    Silver Member cdhd2001's Avatar
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    texas

    Default Re: Tractor Shed - Need Framing Ideas

    Quote Originally Posted by RobJ
    Regarding the oaks, and other trees, down here the problem roots are just under the ground to 2' down or so. Companies trench down about 2 feet, slip in a blocker of some kind, plastic I've seen, then cover it up. The roots are cut of course. I haven't heard of this killing a lot of trees so I guess they still do it. Under a oak sure makes a nice place to work on something in the summer!!
    Most cities & regulatory agencies consider a tree's drip line to be calculated from the diameter.

    Example:

    12" dia. tree has a 12 ft. radius drip line. The Critical Root zone is defined as being 1/2 of the drip line radius, for our example it would be 6 ft. radius. If you cut or fill within the Critical Root zone most arborists and agencies consider the tree dead and you have to do tree mitigation & replacement.
    John Deere 2520 with 200cX FEL & 47 BH

    King Kutter XB 4ft rotary cutter
    Armstrong Ag 4ft. Box Blade
    King Kutter XB 5ft. Grader Blade
    Ag Meier Post hole digger
    King Kutter XB Middle Buster
    Bucket Forks

  5. #15
    Silver Member cdhd2001's Avatar
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    texas

    Default Re: Tractor Shed - Need Framing Ideas

    My place is not in regulated area, so no permits or mitigation is required.

    However, my placement of the shed is constrained by easements, floodplain, large trees and accessibility. My only other buildable area is going to be our future 24 ft. x 32 ft. garage/ work shop (at the end of the house). The tractor shed is a "test the waters" project before building the garage.

    The walls of the shed will be 6 ft. from the tree trunks.

    The floor is going to be crushed rock. I just need space for my little tractor and implements.

    I understand the issue with close proximity to the trees and limbs dropping. But, for those that cut down every tree that is close to "something", on a small acre lot you will soon not have any trees left. The tree thing is a tough call with no real "right" answers.
    John Deere 2520 with 200cX FEL & 47 BH

    King Kutter XB 4ft rotary cutter
    Armstrong Ag 4ft. Box Blade
    King Kutter XB 5ft. Grader Blade
    Ag Meier Post hole digger
    King Kutter XB Middle Buster
    Bucket Forks

  6. #16
    Elite Member
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    Windham County, Conn
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    Ford 2120 , New Holland TN75D, Hitachi UH083LC Excavator

    Default Re: Tractor Shed - Need Framing Ideas

    If you haven't seen these you might find some ideas here:

    Free Truss Plans

    Andy

  7. #17
    Elite Member
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    Windham County, Conn
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    Ford 2120 , New Holland TN75D, Hitachi UH083LC Excavator

    Default Re: Tractor Shed - Need Framing Ideas


  8. #18
    Super Star Member EddieWalker's Avatar
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    Tyler, Texas
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    Several, all used and abused.

    Default Re: Tractor Shed - Need Framing Ideas

    Sounds like you've thought it through. With your dimensions, it will be a good sized storage shed that should work out well for you. Especially with the future addition of your real workshop.

    I mentioned my workshop, but I didn't mention that I'm going to build a storage building similar in size to what you are buildint this year. It will be an enclosed building 16ft by 18ft and then there will be three ten foot bays for another 30ft of covered storage/parking. Each bay will be 16 feet deep and ten feet wide. The entire building will be 16ft by 48 ft. I'll cover it in Hardi Siding just like Rob did on his garage, except I'm going to stain mine to look like real wood. The roof will be green metal to match my house/shop. Trusses will be on 4ft centers with flat 2x4 purlins every 4ft.

    Eddie

  9. #19
    Elite Member RobJ's Avatar
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    Spring, TX (Houston)
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    Kubota L2500

    Default Re: Tractor Shed - Need Framing Ideas

    Quote Originally Posted by EddieWalker
    The roof will be green metal to match my house/shop. Eddie
    My wife wouldn't let me have a green roof. Metal would jump up the cost of the house which I kept at $10 a foot. I was getting prices of $80-$100 a square, the trim pieces are very costly!! I would have even settled for a green comp roof. 20 squares only cost me $500 to roof that house in 2001.
    L2500

  10. #20
    Silver Member cdhd2001's Avatar
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    texas

    Default Re: Tractor Shed - Need Framing Ideas

    Quote Originally Posted by EddieWalker
    Sounds like you've thought it through. With your dimensions, it will be a good sized storage shed that should work out well for you. Especially with the future addition of your real workshop.

    I mentioned my workshop, but I didn't mention that I'm going to build a storage building similar in size to what you are buildint this year. It will be an enclosed building 16ft by 18ft and then there will be three ten foot bays for another 30ft of covered storage/parking. Each bay will be 16 feet deep and ten feet wide. The entire building will be 16ft by 48 ft. I'll cover it in Hardi Siding just like Rob did on his garage, except I'm going to stain mine to look like real wood. The roof will be green metal to match my house/shop. Trusses will be on 4ft centers with flat 2x4 purlins every 4ft.

    Eddie
    Cool!

    Eddie, you mentioned purlins on 4 ft centers? Every pole barn plan I have seen all say 24" centers for the purlins?


    FYI..
    My property shape and features (creek/ floodplain) has been really difficult to work around. The only other spot for the tractor shed would in the immediate back yard next to the deck. Wife said "**** no" to that location.
    John Deere 2520 with 200cX FEL & 47 BH

    King Kutter XB 4ft rotary cutter
    Armstrong Ag 4ft. Box Blade
    King Kutter XB 5ft. Grader Blade
    Ag Meier Post hole digger
    King Kutter XB Middle Buster
    Bucket Forks

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