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  1. #1
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    Default Haywagon rebuild thread

    So, a few months back I found a haywagon frame that my FIL bought. The rack on it was "well worn" to say the least, but the running gear looked decent (made by Electric Wheel, nothing wose than surface rust on it).
    We bought it and used it when cutting one of our fields (we had more hay than one wagon would fit) and when we finished with that, I pulled the rack off
    -rack-coming-off-large-jpg

    Stuffed it with the brush that we had gathered
    -ready-burn-large-jpg

    And lit it on fire
    -burn-baby-burn-large-jpg

    It burned quite well, as did then smaller brushpile that we burned at the same time
    -we-like-burn-things-large

    That was back in mid July, between now and then I have been getting the brackets that hold the frame to the running gear replaced (3/4 of them were made of 1/8" steel and had been welded several times, the new ones were made from 1/4" steel and had better not split.
    Last week my brother started painting the running gear and got most of it done (he did not do the front beam which needed to be welded first as it had some holes rusted into it where the frame had been sitting on the running gear).

    This morning we had a friend over with his Miller 180 (we need to get a welder), he welded in a 1x2 piece on the one side of the front beam (rusted through) and his son practiced his stringers on the other side of the beam (not rusted through, but pitted). After they left, I repacked the bearings on the wheels (side note, has anyone seen great that looked and felt like caramel? That is what the grease that was in there looked/felt like) and cleaned up the rims with a wire wheel in my angle grinder.

    I then painted the wheels and hubs JD Yellow and the front beam JD green. So far, it looks good to me. Here is a picture of how the running gear looks so far:
    -painted-running-gear-jpg

    The plan is to rebuild (or have rebuilt) the rack using the plans I found from the University of Wisconsin Haywagon Plans 6173_b.pdf

    So far the only change from the plan that we are planning on making is to put a door on both sides (rather than just on the LH side)

    The intended purpose for this haywagon is to have it be equally good as a haywagon hauling hay and as a haywagon doing hayrides. Does anyone have any suggestions on improvements that we can make now before we purchase the materials or start building?

    I will be updating this thread as the project continues.

    Thanks

    Aaron Z
    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
    Robert Heinlein, Time Enough for Love

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Haywagon rebuild thread

    Structural integrity question: The plans list the sills (going F to R and bolting to the rack) as being 4x8x16 boards, should a 4x6 board (or a 4x6 and a 2x6 sandwiched together) work for this purpose (assuming that there is clearance for the wheels)?
    Having the wagon a little lower would be nice at times.

    Anyone have any ideas on this?

    Thanks

    Aaron Z
    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
    Robert Heinlein, Time Enough for Love

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Haywagon rebuild thread

    I would build a laminated sill out of 4 2x6 or 3 3x8 and hope that would be strong enough. I won't say for sure tho - 2x6 is really only 5.5 inches, that could have some flex to it.... These days the wood is too poor, 4x6 or 4x8 are too poor, too crooked, etc. One knot & you have a bad piece of wood.

    Laminataed is much stronger these days, gets the knots in different places, no warping.

    A suggestion - gunk & moisture build up between the floor planks, and rot these sills. (Actually they are stringers.....) Forty years ago dad built a hay wagon, and he put tin over the top of the stringers, nailed through it to mount the planks.

    Two years ago I had to rebuild the wagon, the planks were rotted out shot. The stringers were like new, I got 2 new pieces of tin (I got 16 foot white galvalume flashing 10 inches wide) and put it under the flooring. Should be good for another 40 years of stringer.

    We do things a little different - we nail or screw the flooring to the 2 stringers, run a 2x6 down each side under the floor, and place 2 bent angle irons under the stringers & up to the 2x6 on the sides. This helps hold the sides up, and doesn't require the extra wood cross pieces and all. We use full 1 inch wood for the flooring.

    --->Paul

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Haywagon rebuild thread

    Quote Originally Posted by rambler View Post
    I would build a laminated sill out of 4 2x6 or 3 3x8 and hope that would be strong enough. I won't say for sure tho - 2x6 is really only 5.5 inches, that could have some flex to it.... These days the wood is too poor, 4x6 or 4x8 are too poor, too crooked, etc. One knot & you have a bad piece of wood.
    Laminataed is much stronger these days, gets the knots in different places, no warping.
    Will a laminated beam hold up to being "exposed to the elements"? I agree with you on the quality of todays lumber. I have been thinking of seeing if I can get rough cut oak or black locust for the stringers... Will have to think on it.

    A suggestion - gunk & moisture build up between the floor planks, and rot these sills. (Actually they are stringers.....) Forty years ago dad built a hay wagon, and he put tin over the top of the stringers, nailed through it to mount the planks.
    Two years ago I had to rebuild the wagon, the planks were rotted out shot. The stringers were like new, I got 2 new pieces of tin (I got 16 foot white galvalume flashing 10 inches wide) and put it under the flooring. Should be good for another 40 years of stringer.
    I think that we will do that, it is cheap enough and it should help keep the junk off of the stringers. What did you use to preserve the old decking (and what was it made of)?

    We do things a little different - we nail or screw the flooring to the 2 stringers, run a 2x6 down each side under the floor, and place 2 bent angle irons under the stringers & up to the 2x6 on the sides. This helps hold the sides up, and doesn't require the extra wood cross pieces and all. We use full 1 inch wood for the flooring.
    How does that hold up? I saw something similar on a haywagon near here, but they had used 2x6s for the decking.

    Thanks

    Aaron Z
    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
    Robert Heinlein, Time Enough for Love

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Haywagon rebuild thread

    Well, dad built the hayrack with materials he had laying around about 40 years ago.

    So, the decking was homesawn lumber - the back 3 planks were black walnut. Others were mostly elm, with other local hardwoods. All actual 1 inch thickness.

    I kid you not. I probably had the most fancy hayrack.....

    I redid it with 5/4 treated decking. Only been a couple years, don't know how well that will hold up.

    We used to stack 120 bales on it, good load for a running gear made of welded old axles from cars, so it held up well.

    Oh, I would think the laminated beam would hold up fine if you cover it as I mentioned with tin. You may want to brush on a bit of a preseravtive as you assemble - used motor oil or a sealer, whichever you prefer.

    --->Paul

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Haywagon rebuild thread

    Quote Originally Posted by rambler View Post
    We do things a little different - we nail or screw the flooring to the 2 stringers, run a 2x6 down each side under the floor, and place 2 bent angle irons under the stringers & up to the 2x6 on the sides. This helps hold the sides up, and doesn't require the extra wood cross pieces and all. We use full 1 inch wood for the flooring
    Did this wagon have sides or is it a flatbed wagon? If it has sides, could I trouble you to explain or post a picture of how the sides attach to the floor?


    Thanks

    Aaron Z
    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
    Robert Heinlein, Time Enough for Love

  7. #7
    Super Star Member
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    Default Re: Haywagon rebuild thread

    Well, it is painted and the wheels are back on, next we will need to paint/install the brackets and build the frame.

    Here is how it currently looks:
    -0904091926a-jpg

    Aaron Z
    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
    Robert Heinlein, Time Enough for Love

  8. #8
    Super Member radioman's Avatar
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    Default Re: Haywagon rebuild thread

    very nice job so far.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Haywagon rebuild thread

    Quote Originally Posted by aczlan View Post
    Did this wagon have sides or is it a flatbed wagon? If it has sides, could I trouble you to explain or post a picture of how the sides attach to the floor?


    Thanks

    Aaron Z
    Just a hayrack, no sides.

    An old hayrack had 'wobbly' sides, only a foot or so high. Just 3 flat irons on each side, twisted, so it made 3 loops on each side to drop a 1x12 with 3 pegs on it into. Today, one would use a square pocket bracket. This would not make a tight seal unless you really worked at it.

    --->Paul

  10. #10
    Super Star Member
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    Default Re: Haywagon rebuild thread

    Quote Originally Posted by rambler View Post
    Just a hayrack, no sides.
    An old hayrack had 'wobbly' sides, only a foot or so high. Just 3 flat irons on each side, twisted, so it made 3 loops on each side to drop a 1x12 with 3 pegs on it into. Today, one would use a square pocket bracket. This would not make a tight seal unless you really worked at it.
    Ok, looks like we will be going with the "traditional" deck as I need to have sides (we have a kicker on our baler). Perhaps a laminate beam will still work.....

    Aaron Z
    A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
    Robert Heinlein, Time Enough for Love

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