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  1. #4461
    Super Star Member brin's Avatar
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    Georgia - Mt. Vernon by The Store just 5 miles east and right by the big oak tree then to the creek.

    Default Re: At Home In The Woods

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert_in_NY View Post
    I find it funny, around here you can't give pine away to burn. That includes it already being cut to length, just split and go. Took around 7 full cord of pine to a friend to burn in his shop. We dropped the trees, cut the wood, loaded, hauled and dumped in his back yard 20 miles away. 4 loads in all and didn't ask for a penny. Yet everyone locally turned us down, wanted nothing to do with burning pine. I have around 60 more pine trees to drop still. It is a shame to let wood go to waste.
    Robert ...you are right....It is a country and urban legend that burning pine deposits creosote on your chimney...Not True...not having a hot enough fire is what caused creosote buildup no matter what type of wood...Pine burns hotter and faster than hardwood....We have burned pine along with oak and hickory for decades...no problems...lots of heat...
    Bob

    WORRYING does not take away tomorrow's TROUBLES, it takes away today's PEACE.


    NH - TC-29 , FEL, Bush hog, Bush hog brand finishing mower, Post hole digger, 6' Back blade, sub-soiler, Pallet forks, 20KW PTO Generator , 21 hp Murray Mower
    JD -3020 with FEL and a 16 HP. K-Grow Lawn Tractor (bought from K Mart 1994) and runs great !
    Clark 130 EN Mig Welder

  2. #4462
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
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    5,657
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    Cedartown, Ga and N. Ga mountains
    Tractor
    1998 Kubota B21, 2005 Kubota L39

    Default Re: At Home In The Woods

    I agree with Brim, nothing wrong with burning well cured pine. The only down side is it burns hot and fast, which isn't always bad, plus it can be pretty sappy when splitting.

    MarkV

  3. #4463
    Super Member dave1949's Avatar
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    Apr 2009
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    9,010
    Location
    Industry, Maine
    Tractor
    New Holland TC40

    Default Re: At Home In The Woods

    It's rare to see pine or poplar offered for firewood here too, and when it is, the price is low. On the other hand, there are areas where hardwoods just aren't available, so softwood is the thing that is used. I don't know if there are differences in creosote formation from one softwood to another (spruce, pine fir, etc) but I agree with Bob that a good bright fire is the best way to avoid creosote regardless of wood species.

    The problem with using softwood, compared to hardwood, is it takes a lot more wood to get the same btu's. More cutting, splitting, stacking and toting is not a bonus feature with firewood for the DIY or commercial seller. It takes as much machinery, time and work to make up a cord of hardwood as softwood, but it sells for a lot less.

    Paying for standing trees (stumpage) is not a big portion of commercial firewood sellers' costs. I think it ranges from $15 to $25 per cord for hardwood if I'm not mistaken.
    "Those were the days my friend, we thought they'd never end ..."

  4. #4464
    Veteran Member buckeyefarmer's Avatar
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    Jun 2005
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    2,202
    Location
    MD
    Tractor
    Kubota L3940 L5030 MF205-4

    Default Re: At Home In The Woods

    Quote Originally Posted by srs View Post
    Attachment 288883Attachment 288884

    Obed, I added this receiver to my loader bucket which allows me to insert a ball hitch to use on my trailer. The tall ball hitch seen in the center of the bucket is used to get under the tongue of my trailer.
    I just got a hitch receiver that mounts on my pallet fork frame. Wished a had gotten a picture of moving my camper with my front end loader the other day.
    L3940HSTC, QA FEL, BH92
    L5030HST,QA,FEL
    MF 205-4
    Husqvarna YTH24V48LS (the other orange)
    KK Finish Mower, KK Tiller, 6' rotary mower, Pallet forks, PHD, Blade, Carryall, cultivator, 2 wheel barrows, assorted gardening tools,

  5. #4465
    Super Member clemsonfor's Avatar
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    Sep 2009
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    6,147
    Location
    Greenwood Co., SC
    Tractor
    Yanmar YM2000

    Default Re: At Home In The Woods

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert_in_NY View Post
    I find it funny, around here you can't give pine away to burn. That includes it already being cut to length, just split and go. Took around 7 full cord of pine to a friend to burn in his shop. We dropped the trees, cut the wood, loaded, hauled and dumped in his back yard 20 miles away. 4 loads in all and didn't ask for a penny. Yet everyone locally turned us down, wanted nothing to do with burning pine. I have around 60 more pine trees to drop still. It is a shame to let wood go to waste.
    I burn it, its just a wives tale. What about all those people that don't have anything but pine to burn?? There places up north and west with pretty much only softwood to burn??? There is not as much heat in the pine but it will burn hot fast. Its good for early and late season as well as when your home and can load the stove more often.

    And the less BTU part is the thing that I have cut it in the past for myself. IT takes just as much effort to cut load and split pine, why not get a higher btu wood. But when the pine is close to the road I will grab it as I have gotten most of the easy oak in my areas. Other folks wont touch it so I can get all I want. But this year I have been trying hard to burn real seasoned wood, oak takes at least 2-3 years split to dry to 20%MC but dead pine I can get there in 3-6 months so I cut about a 1/3 of a cord so that I can have some good dry wood to add to my other hardwood I have. Instead of cutting more oak that wont be anywhere near ready this spring I cut a few smaller loads of pine that I knew would be ready this time of year. Even 2 year old dead oak if not split is nowhere near ready after 6 months. The pine I spit ranges right now from 9-20% mc!
    YM2000. MF dirt scoop,4' Jbar bushhog,boompole, LMC 12-16 disk harrow, 4' Atlas boxblade (with rippers). 1980 chevy K10,1990 ford ranger 2wd (285K miles),1997 saturn SL2 (twin cam!!),2001Toyota Higlander
    1986 Cobia 177 sunskiff w/1981 Johnson 60 hp
    1991 Javalen 17ft w/same year 150 Johnson GT
    Troybuilt 4 cycle & Echo 2 stroke,cold natured(need carb rebuild),MS390 Stihl, Northern tool pressure washer, mixes water into the oil in the pump(now dead, motor on a tiller). 5000 watt generator.

  6. #4466
    Super Star Member Diamondpilot's Avatar
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    Jan 2007
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    13,834
    Location
    Daleville, IN
    Tractor
    Jinma 254/284 Ford 861 Powermaster at work

    Default Re: At Home In The Woods

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkV View Post
    I agree with Brim, nothing wrong with burning well cured pine. The only down side is it burns hot and fast, which isn't always bad, plus it can be pretty sappy when splitting.

    MarkV
    To me the only down side or major down side is the pine sap. I will not touch the stuff anymore. Just too much of a mess when cutting and splitting. If I had no other choice I would burn it but around here oak, maple, elm, hedge, and ash are preferred.

    Chris

  7. #4467
    Elite Member MotorSeven's Avatar
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    Aug 2005
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    3,806
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    NE TENN (Hancock Co)
    Tractor
    Kioti DK40SE Hydro

    Default Re: At Home In The Woods

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert_in_NY View Post
    I find it funny, around here you can't give pine away to burn. That includes it already being cut to length, just split and go. Took around 7 full cord of pine to a friend to burn in his shop. We dropped the trees, cut the wood, loaded, hauled and dumped in his back yard 20 miles away. 4 loads in all and didn't ask for a penny. Yet everyone locally turned us down, wanted nothing to do with burning pine. I have around 60 more pine trees to drop still. It is a shame to let wood go to waste.
    Yep, I burn a lot of pine, & cedar...it splits easy, is lighter and there is tons of it close to every driveway & road just about any direction I go from home. Why worry about creosote if you sweep your flue/chimney once a year anyway????? I bought a Sooteater for the new flue system int he house...can't wait to try it out this spring.
    2008 KIOTI DK40Se Hydro
    1978 Sling Blade/wood handle

  8. #4468
    Elite Member Obed's Avatar
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    Dec 2006
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    2,528
    Location
    East TN
    Tractor
    John Deere 4210 FEL BH

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MotorSeven
    Why worry about creosote if you sweep your flue/chimney once a year anyway????? I bought a Sooteater for the new flue system int he house...can't wait to try it out this spring.
    Rick,
    That is what I concluded last season after I cleaned my chimney myself. We burned mostly unseasoned wood and my chimney was not a fire hazard. We paid less for the brush and poles than one chimney sweep hire. And sweeping the chimney wasn't hard.

    What I'm learning this year is I can burn a lower temp fire with dry wood and not get the house too warm. It takes a hotter fire to burn wet wood without the fire wanting to go out. With outside temps ranging from 35 to 60 degrees this season, we have been able to keep the living room at 72 degrees burning seasoned hardwood. We have burned wood continuously for a month.
    Obed
    John Deere 4210 (28 HP) FEL, BH, 6' Box Blade, Loader Forks

    At Home In the Woods

  9. #4469
    Veteran Member vtsnowedin's Avatar
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    Jul 2011
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    1,799

    Default Re: At Home In The Woods

    You can gain quite a bit of control by varying the amount of wood you put in at each fireing. A fire box half full will last just as long and put out just half the heat. Another thing wood heat newbies often do is split all their wood too fine. The increased surface area exposed to the flames makes the whole load catch right away and burn down too ash that much quicker. Nice when your starting the fire but a hindrance when you want a fire to last all night. Better to have a mix of sizes and to put in a couple of logs that just fit on the pile of coals when you put it to bed.

  10. #4470
    Elite Member Obed's Avatar
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    Dec 2006
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    2,528
    Location
    East TN
    Tractor
    John Deere 4210 FEL BH

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vtsnowedin
    You can gain quite a bit of control by varying the amount of wood you put in at each fireing. A fire box half full will last just as long and put out just half the heat. Another thing wood heat newbies often do is split all their wood too fine. The increased surface area exposed to the flames makes the whole load catch right away and burn down too ash that much quicker. Nice when your starting the fire but a hindrance when you want a fire to last all night. Better to have a mix of sizes and to put in a couple of logs that just fit on the pile of coals when you put it to bed.
    vtsnowedin,
    This is just my second season heating with wood so I'm still learning. During the day we have just been putting one log at a time in the fireplace on top of the existing coals. We have also been keeping the air control all the way down so there is hardly any flame. The logs just smoulder but the fireplace still puts out enough heat to keep the entire house at 72 degrees. I have been filling the fireplace up at night but am wondering if I can get by with putting fewer logs on the fire at night. I do like to put a big fat log on the fire at night so that I have better coals in the morning.
    Obed
    John Deere 4210 (28 HP) FEL, BH, 6' Box Blade, Loader Forks

    At Home In the Woods

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