Page 2 of 56 FirstFirst 123451252 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 551
  1. #11
    Platinum Member terry.dinerman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    513
    Location
    "The Old Goat Ranch" Grimes County, Texas
    Tractor
    1990 - JD 870

    Default Re: An Old Goat Ranch in Texas

    Egon-

    From what I hear...goats can fly...

    Be Safe-

    T
    "...As I get older, I find that any day in which my gratitude exceeds my expectations is a good day..."

    ----- Ray Wylie Hubbard, musician



  2. #12
    Platinum Member terry.dinerman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    513
    Location
    "The Old Goat Ranch" Grimes County, Texas
    Tractor
    1990 - JD 870

    Default Re: An Old Goat Ranch in Texas

    Thanks Eddie-

    This is a very well designed site...if you seek, you find...all the tools were there?you can't ask for much more than that.

    The pond is just a wee tank...the property pitches about 6 feet downhill across the 1,200 foot run from the highway...a gentle slope...so to ensure the home-site drainage I had our dirt guy dig a 60' x 8' tank at the low corner of the clearing.

    I then used the dirt to raise the house pad. It will set up there and "weather-compact" while I work on other projects and be ready for foundation work when I am.

    An ulterior motive was to determine the depth of the local water table....nearby dozed tanks hold water even at the height of summer and I was hoping I would get lucky...

    Got Lucky...the water table starts about 6 feet down even during the worst of this past summerç—´ drought...and the torrential rains just prior to this photo filled the thing brim full, leaving a nice dry site...WOO HOO!!!

    The Old Philosopher sez: "Even a blind squirrel will bump into an acorn occasionally..."

    Since the ground is a thick sandy layer over heavy yellow clay, I can jet a shallow well for ag water when I need to....the "city" water is expensive, but still cheaper than a deep well.

    For now, the deer, cattle and small critters find the water is just fine...the ground around the tank is a flurry of foot-prints...

    Here is a pic...

    Be Safe-

    Terry




    Quote Originally Posted by EddieWalker View Post
    I was just about to reply to your email when I came across your thread. Looks like you're off and running with an interesting thread that should offer plenty of entertainment and ideas. While I don't know anything about goats or fences to keep them in, But I do know a little bit about water lines and building stuff.

    Any more pics of your place? How about that pond?

    Eddie
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails An Old Goat Ranch in Texas-055.jpg  
    "...As I get older, I find that any day in which my gratitude exceeds my expectations is a good day..."

    ----- Ray Wylie Hubbard, musician



  3. #13
    Platinum Member terry.dinerman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    513
    Location
    "The Old Goat Ranch" Grimes County, Texas
    Tractor
    1990 - JD 870

    Default Re: An Old Goat Ranch in Texas

    'Bota-Fan-

    Thanks Brother...I'm glad you are all down with us Medics...but I don't really save many lives...I just prolong that painful interlude between now and whatever comes next...

    Be Safe, and may the Joy's of the Season be yours as well...

    Terry



    Quote Originally Posted by 'Bota Fan View Post
    That funny, and you save lives for a living, to boot. Welcome to TBN, brother. I believe you've got the thread-starting thing down.

    Merry Christmas to you, your family and the goats!
    "...As I get older, I find that any day in which my gratitude exceeds my expectations is a good day..."

    ----- Ray Wylie Hubbard, musician



  4. #14
    Platinum Member terry.dinerman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    513
    Location
    "The Old Goat Ranch" Grimes County, Texas
    Tractor
    1990 - JD 870

    Default Re: An Old Goat Ranch in Texas

    JoeinTX-

    Yeah...that new fence attracted quite a lot of attention from my neighbors...so much so, that if I ever forget my combination I just have to go down to the Café and ask ANYONE…

    But the upside of all that attention is finding out how deee-lightful my new neighbors ARE...supportive and full of advice, most good, some not, but all given in the spirit of friendship...Good People...

    I appreciate your concern about my fence...but be of light heart...the "tune" comment was just hyperbole...I have shed a lot of blood building fence...

    After moving to Texas “backintheday” I needed a good job while I was “breaking out” in my main meal-ticket ,which was, at the time, Diving and Salvage.

    I found just the thing working for a barn-builder...went the length and breadth of the State building wood-frame pole buildings and the fencing to go with em as needed.

    My current peculiar situation working by-the-contract means if I am working I have the money to do stuff, but do not have the time...when I have plenty of time, I don’t have the money...

    So...Precious Bride and I work a while and save up for some projects, find a good craftsman and then contract it out.

    I spec’d the fence out and my Mother-In-Law found a local contractor who wanted a job he could work on a bit at a time...between larger jobs to keep his crew busy and as a way to train his young nephew in the trade. His price was fair and the completed jobs of his I visited were EXCELLENT.

    I spec’d the corners for 8” treated poles set 4 feet deep in minimum 12” holes backfilled with concrete to increase the diameter. The soil bearing strength of our local sandy clay needs a bit of help. The main runs are t-posts with a 2.5” treated wooden stringer every tenth post, an H “line-post” every 600 feet or at least one in every side, a heavy gage strand of barb ground wire under 1047-12-11 variable mesh with another strand of barb topper.

    The entry setback at the highway is rough-cut treated 2x6 corral boards faced with welded stock panels on 8” posts with two 10 foot tube and stock panel gates swinging on 8” posts as well.

    Our contractor out-did himself on this job...every post is plumb and true, every wire join wrap looks like he was wrapping ferrules on a fishing rod, the wire is pulled just SO....(50% deflection on the “spring kinks”)

    I watched him working/ teaching his nephew one afternoon...patient and good natured...but hard at it....if I had as good a teacher I would still be building barns...

    The work is a real showpiece. I would not have done as good a job...

    The proof of the pudding is the reduction in pig sign I see around my water tank...you can still find a few spots where “Hogzilla” has tried the fence, but no breaches...the rains have made digging in the soft sand easier in the wet spots so a few small ones still get thru, but condsidering how many USED to be in the bushes and considering the amount of acorns and steady water available, I must be on the local wild hogs “B-List”...

    The little ones efforts keeps “fill holes” at the top of my “Honey-doo” list…

    When a storm blew down a few rotten trees onto the wire, it supported an immense amount of weight without parting, tho it got bent to blazes, it was no problem patching it back up.

    The increase in cost over my original estimate was based on my decision to have this fellow install new fence across portions of the existing runs that I had originally intended to rehab...when I looked at that old rusty stuff in comparison to the new lines, I knew I couldn’t turn out as good a job for not but a little less money...(the old fences were 3 strand barb for cattle and in pretty poor shape) I can handle all the cross-fencing for paddocks within this perimeter and will save a few $$$ there...

    So all in all, I have value for the money...I don’t see this current fence needing replacement till after I’m long dead...then it’s my Kids Problem...

    Back in the days of the Republic, the property was a plum orchard, now long overgrown....we are intending to run meat goats and put up a couple of small greenhouses for exotic lillies...we have not introduced any goats yet as we are not living full-time on the land right now, but now that it is fenced we lease it to a neighbor to run his cattle on...just have to kick open the back gate...

    What sort of operation do you have?

    Be Safe!

    T


    Quote Originally Posted by JoeinTX View Post
    "We quickly earned the approval of the crowd at the local Cafe by putting up a fence that will hold anything from a Chihuahua to a Brahma bull. It is known locally as the "Prada Perimeter" and naturally we sure had to pay a premium to get it done right. You can play a tune on that wire..."

    Funny you should say that. The quickest and surest way to tell a piece of property has changed hands is the presence of new fence activity. Vice versa is true.......fence falling down in absolute disrepair means the owner is still trying to sell, has found no buyers, and isn't spending a dime on the place.

    Also, FYI, a lot of fences with bow-string tight wire today will be sagging messes with leaning corners and problems to fix in 5 years. Learn to do your own fencing.

    If I understand, this being an old goat run..........what kind of shape is it in and what do you want to do with it?
    "...As I get older, I find that any day in which my gratitude exceeds my expectations is a good day..."

    ----- Ray Wylie Hubbard, musician



  5. #15
    Platinum Member terry.dinerman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    513
    Location
    "The Old Goat Ranch" Grimes County, Texas
    Tractor
    1990 - JD 870

    Default Re: An Old Goat Ranch in Texas

    Ultrarunner-

    I WISH that Cat was mine! It belongs to our local "Zen Dirt Master"....the old geezer is 20 years my senior, been running machines since he could climb on top of one, and owns all the materials pits in this end of the county...

    Just works those jobs he FEELS like working...

    He kept me steppin lively-like to keep up with him flagging "keeper" trees when he cleared our homesite...the old guy has poured more dirt out of his dungaree cuffs than I've walked over...

    Be Safe!

    T



    Quote Originally Posted by ultrarunner View Post
    Nice looking CAT D4 you got there!
    "...As I get older, I find that any day in which my gratitude exceeds my expectations is a good day..."

    ----- Ray Wylie Hubbard, musician



  6. #16
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    336
    Location
    Grimes County, Texas
    Tractor
    Kubota GL 3940

    Default Re: An Old Goat Ranch in Texas

    Hey T.,

    I too am new to the forum, bought in Grimes county, and have some of the same background as yourself - Diving (oilfield. some salvage, not much), travel for work etc. Heck we may have mutual aquantices. It is a small world.

    Sounds like your happy with the fencing contractor and I'm now in the process of getting quotes for my fence to be installed in January. Same sort of soil as yours only on more of a slope - the main reason I want a professional to do it. If you'd want to drop the name of your guy I would not mind giving him the chance to quote job price.

    Good luck with your ranching ventures and I'm looking forward to following your progress.

    Reily

  7. #17
    Veteran Member weldingisfun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,514
    Location
    West Bell County, Texas
    Tractor
    Mahindra 4500 4WD w/FEL, and Scotts S2048 lawn tractor

    Default Re: An Old Goat Ranch in Texas

    Welcome to TBN, Terry. I will look forward to your future postings.
    We have been raising goats for a little over ten years, so if we can be of help to you when the time comes, let us know.
    We also know some breeders up near you who have great stock and will put you in touch with them when you are ready to buy your foundation stock. The most critical animal is your buck, or herd sire.
    You are off to a good start. But, don't worry too much about all the stories you hear about keeping goats on your property. If you give them a good reason to stay, i.e., a good fence, plenty of feed and clean water, they will stay on your property.
    Merry Christmas and a very Happy New Year.

  8. #18
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    6,031
    Location
    Wise county Texas
    Tractor
    Kioti DK 35 now

    Default Re: An Old Goat Ranch in Texas

    Welcome to the "club",

    I know what you mean about small town folks, The "coffee house" was always a pleasure to visit to catch up on town gossip, who's animals went where? fish'n reports? ufo sightings..

    Funny you said "most folks are nice, some aren't" My experience has been the same, but I have found that some of the biggest A$#% at first end up being some of the best and most reliable friends. Try coming into a small town wearing a uniform..LOL

    How much is your 1000' electrical run going to be? it is a co-op I presume? reason I ask, is I went through this last December and just had a co-op engineer out yesterday to give me options on a new shop location. So far I have to pay $5.75 per foot line fee + $375 transformer fee. This is because I am not a new service, when we moved in it was the 1st 400" free.

    I also ran my own water from the well up on the hill where we hope to eventually build. 1300 feet cost me around $1000 with 1 1/4 pvc.

    Sounds like you have allot to think about in your off time, that should make it fly by..

  9. #19
    Veteran Member weldingisfun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,514
    Location
    West Bell County, Texas
    Tractor
    Mahindra 4500 4WD w/FEL, and Scotts S2048 lawn tractor

    Default Re: An Old Goat Ranch in Texas

    I'm back because I forgot to mention something about raising goats that you should include in your planning now. Then I read Western's post about the electric service.
    First the goat info: If you plan to raise goats, meaning controlled breeding as compared to letting them breed like rabbits, you will need to have a seperate pen for your buck, that means extra stout fence and electric. All you should need is about a half acre.
    Now the electric: Before we built on our place, we had electric service brought in to provide power for the well. The cost for the 1000+' run and transformer......$40. We cleared the ROW ourselves.
    A few years later we asked about adding a transformer to an existing line crossing our property to a neighbor's place, for power to our animal barns. The price.... a second meter added to our monthly billing.
    We are with an electric co-op. Check into it, you may be pleasantly surprised.

  10. #20
    Platinum Member terry.dinerman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    513
    Location
    "The Old Goat Ranch" Grimes County, Texas
    Tractor
    1990 - JD 870

    Default Re: An Old Goat Ranch in Texas

    Weldingisfun-

    I visited your website...excellent!

    And I appreciate your kind offer....nothing beats experience...and any stock we buy will be bought after a lot of legwork...we can't afford to spend a dime foolishly.

    And I don't believe all the "Goat vs Fence" stories either....they make good chatter tho, don't they?

    Most of the reason for the extravagant perimeter fence is to keep things OUT. Our county is overrun with wild pigs (some of them are @#$% BIG!) and we live close enough to "Civilization" to see the routine dumping of unwanted dogs, which regularly pack up and harass livestock....and there is the occasional two legged predator as well...

    Like you said...you gotta give em a reason to stay...clean quarters, good food and a stimulating environment are what keep ME inside the fence too!

    Tho, like the occasional goat, I just HAVE to climb the fence and see whats up...adventure calls...I go...

    My childhood was spent in the Live Poultry business, and I had an Uncle who was a dairyman...don't get me started on the commercial virtues of ethical animal husbandry....it all boils down to simple dollars and cents...well tended stock kept in clean, lower density housing will have a better feed conversion and lower levels of stress and the less stress they undergo the less disease, fighting and cannibalism you will have to deal with. Happy stock = more $$$

    From the pics on your website, it is apparent that you know a thing or two about goats...beautiful stock, Sir.

    I would entertain any advice regarding breeders in or near Grimes County...we are at least a year or so from a full start up, so there is plenty of time to build the relationships that will bear fruit later on.

    May the Seasons Joy be YOURS-

    Be Safe-

    Terry

    Quote Originally Posted by weldingisfun View Post
    Welcome to TBN, Terry. I will look forward to your future postings.
    We have been raising goats for a little over ten years, so if we can be of help to you when the time comes, let us know.
    We also know some breeders up near you who have great stock and will put you in touch with them when you are ready to buy your foundation stock. The most critical animal is your buck, or herd sire.
    You are off to a good start. But, don't worry too much about all the stories you hear about keeping goats on your property. If you give them a good reason to stay, i.e., a good fence, plenty of feed and clean water, they will stay on your property.
    Merry Christmas and a very Happy New Year.
    "...As I get older, I find that any day in which my gratitude exceeds my expectations is a good day..."

    ----- Ray Wylie Hubbard, musician



Page 2 of 56 FirstFirst 123451252 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2013 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.