Page 1 of 14 123411 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 133
  1. #1
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    121
    Tractor
    Kioti CK20

    Default Big Multi Year Project About to Begin...help!

    If all goes well, my wife and I will close on forty five acres of land in further North New Hampshire. This is a dream come true for us and we are excited to get going. The property is old farm land, hundred years or more, that was logged maybe twenty or thirty years back. About 20% is old growth, the rest is fast growing soft woods and smaller hard woods of various species.

    The property is surround on all four sides by National Forest. Access is by one of two class VI roads. The better of the two is maintained but the Forest Service during the summer. Unfortunately using this road requires that we also travel down a road that is issued as a snowmobile trail in the winter and we don't want to do that. The property's namesake road is barely a road, this is the one we will use.

    From the terminus of the town road to what is in effect our drive way (though technically it's still town owned) is about a mile. The grade is uphill ranging from 2% to 6% grade. The road is reasonably crowned, with the approximation of drainage ditches on both sides. There are four water brakes that are in serious need of attention.

    The plan for the property is to build a fully independent farm. We will not have any town power or any town services.

    We plan on solar, wind and maybe hydro for electricity. Wood and geothermal for heat. I also plan on purchasing a large industrial generator as backup.

    The farm will largely be for our food needs. Beef, poultry, pork, dairy and produce will all be raised in small quantities for our use. (I have another job for money). Extra food will be sold locally.

    We also plan on running a farm get away for kids. We will build a separate bunk house and allow kids to spend a week of two free of charge working on the farm.

    My plan is to update this thread like a blog, assuming there is interest. I will also be seeking a lot of advice. Both my parents grew up on farms and I worked on my grandparents farms as well as others who were less forgiving. I know this is going to be a lot of work and that is what I am looking forward too,my wife not so much. My day job is investments and quite honesty it leaves me feeling less and less confident of the survival of our species everyday. I need the dirt on my hands to wash off the grime at the end of the day. For me this is therapy.

    My excuses having been made, on to project one.

    The road.

    I figure the first thing to do is get the road sorted out. Drainage is an issue, so I figure on installing four culverts made of galvanized steal with concrete block reinforcement. The road is not heavily travelled but will need to support logging and construction equipment. I was planning on trenching out water breaks to about 4.5 feet laying in the 12 inch galvanized steal pipe. I was then going to stack concrete blocks along the sides to take some of the load then cover with gravel.

    Do I need to use rebar?

    What about covering the pipe with gravel? Do I need some sort of reinforcement for the top of the pipe?

    Next I figure a good box blade pulled behind my Kioti DK45, up and down, taking care to leave the crown in place and the road should be serviceable.

    Perhaps this is a fools earned. But the more I see of what has become of our society the more convinced I am we need to find another way. I am not implying that I have the answers, I don't. All I know is that with change comes disruption of the status quo. The ability to productively allocate capital for people is not likely to be worth much in a world where capital has no utility. I guess this is a complicated hedge against chaos. In any event thanks for any thoughts you might have.

    Oh we hope to be in within five years.

    Sulla,(aka David)

  2. #2
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    118
    Location
    Virginia
    Tractor
    kubota m5700

    Default Re: Big Multi Year Project About to Begin...help!

    as long as you have a foot of cover over the pipe you wont need and reinforcement for the culvert pipe.

  3. #3
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    121
    Tractor
    Kioti CK20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ricky williams
    as long as you have a foot of cover over the pipe you wont need and reinforcement for the culvert pipe.
    Thank you, that's what I thought but I wasn't sure.

  4. #4
    Elite Member
    Advertiser
    MtnViewRanch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    7,687
    Location
    4000\' mountains of Southern California
    Tractor
    Mahindra 7520, Mahindra 3215HST, Case 580 extendahoe, Case 310 dozer, Parsons trencher, Cat D6,

    Default Re: Big Multi Year Project About to Begin...help!

    As far as your road goes, I highly recommend a box blade, a rear blade and a grader blade-land plane. All should be heavy duty. When I say heavy duty, I do not mean for you to go by whatever rating is on the implement, I mean real heavy duty. Box blade needs to be 1000lbs or more. A rear blade should be 800lbs or more and a grader blade should also be 1000lbs or more. With as much as you need to do and to maintain don't even bother with anything less.

    I would recommend a box blade with hydraulic actuated rippers, a rear blade with at least 1 hydraulic for angling the blade. The grader blade will be indispensably for maintaining your road. Now all of these implements of top quality bought new will run you a lot of money, like about 8 grand or so. So you might want to keep an eye out for some used ones and maybe cut your costs in half. But you will be by far happier with this quality of implements, especially with what you need to do. And last but not least , some top and tilt hydraulics so that you can have full control of these implements at your finger tips.

    Just my given your circumstances.
    Brian
    Top and Tilt Kits by Fit Rite Hydraulics

  5. #5
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    121
    Tractor
    Kioti CK20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MtnViewRanch
    As far as your road goes, I highly recommend a box blade, a rear blade and a grader blade-land plane. All should be heavy duty. When I say heavy duty, I do not mean for you to go by whatever rating is on the implement, I mean real heavy duty. Box blade needs to be 1000lbs or more. A rear blade should be 800lbs or more and a grader blade should also be 1000lbs or more. With as much as you need to do and to maintain don't even bother with anything less.

    I would recommend a box blade with hydraulic actuated rippers, a rear blade with at least 1 hydraulic for angling the blade. The grader blade will be indispensably for maintaining your road. Now all of these implements of top quality bought new will run you a lot of money, like about 8 grand or so. So you might want to keep an eye out for some used ones and maybe cut your costs in half. But you will be by far happier with this quality of implements, especially with what you need to do. And last but not least , some top and tilt hydraulics so that you can have full control of these implements at your finger tips.

    Just my given your circumstances.
    Thank you, that clears up some questions I had about this equipment. I had found a box blade and a grader blade for short money, they didn't seem substantial enough for what I need to do. Now I get it.

  6. #6
    Elite Member CurlyDave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    4,131
    Location
    Grants Pass, OR
    Tractor
    JD TLB 110

    Default Re: Big Multi Year Project About to Begin...help!

    From the terminus of the town road to what is in effect our drive way (though technically it's still town owned) is about a mile. The grade is uphill ranging from 2% to 6% grade. The road is reasonably crowned, with the approximation of drainage ditches on both sides. There are four water brakes that are in serious need of attention.

    Right there is the biggest problem I see. I think what you are saying is that you have a mile of Town owned, but poorly maintained road, and your plan is to improve it.

    Before you close on the property, make certain that the town will let you improve the road. Many times they will not allow you to do any work on your own on Town property, other times they will, but only if you post a large bond.

    The reasons are many for this, and a lot has to do with liability.

    What are you going to do if you discover that the Town will not allow you to make improvements in the road?
    40 Acres on a hill - fantastic view. JD 110 TLB, 4-n-1, 12" bucket, 18" bucket, Addington thumb, rock bucket (doubles as root grapple)

    Not only do we not understand the universe, if someone explained it to us, we would not know what he was talking about.

    Isaac Asimov

  7. #7
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    121
    Tractor
    Kioti CK20

    Default

    Thank you CurlyDave, that's a good point. That noted the town has a total of three hundred residents and Town Hall is open from 5:00 to 7:00 on. Tuesdays. The Town has no zoning laws whatsoever and the road such as it is, from my neighbors house to Town " center" is maintained by a local farmer.

    I'm not sure anyone will even notice or care, unless I try to developed it. A couple of years back the Forest service kept trying to gate the road it maintains. After the lock was cut three times they gave up locking it.

    We did speak to the "Town" official and he confirmed no zoning and the the road is our problem. I think if I asked for it in writing I'd be run out of Town.

    I think the best course of action is to simply do as I wish and wait for someone to cry foul. Considering our goal is a single family farm, I hoping we'll fit right in.

    I will make a few more inquires.

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    5,666
    Location
    Cedartown, Ga and N. Ga mountains
    Tractor
    1998 Kubota B21, 2005 Kubota L39

    Default Re: Big Multi Year Project About to Begin...help!

    What are the winters like up your way. A mile worth of snow removal is a big job and one that I would be considering when buying equipment. Good luck with your adventure.

    MarkV

  9. #9
    Super Star Member dave1949's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    10,869
    Location
    Industry, Maine
    Tractor
    New Holland TC40

    Default Re: Big Multi Year Project About to Begin...help!

    Good luck on your farm.

    You could make good use of a medium-sized truck (2-5 ton) for hauling animals, feed, supplies, pulling a livestock trailer, etc. There are used single axle dumps that aren't all that expensive. I would look for a truck that can be used as a snow plow in winter, you don't want to do a mile long stretch on a tractor.

    The best way to lower your road building and maintenance expense is to find a nearby source of stone and be able to load it and/or haul it yourself. Trucks gobble fuel, so the closer the better.

    It would be great if you can find a gravel bank on your land, or a neighbor who has one and will sell stone to you. It is too high a reach for many compact tractors to load over the side of a dump truck, so there is that to consider in your tractor size choice.

    I agree with CurlyDave, you need to have a real good handle on the status of the road. More talking with neighbors is a good place to start. Is it really a town road, or used to be years ago when there were more people around? There are 'paper roads' in Maine that legally exist, but there is currently no real 'road'. They are used by ATV's and snowmobiles, or seasonal 4-wheel drives, but not maintained by the town. The towns don't have the funds to upgrade or maintain these 'roads' which is probably why you got the answer you did from the town official - it's a road but you are on your own. Maybe they have selectmen's meetings you could attend and get to know them and ask questions.

    Sounds like a great adventure. From what I have seen and experienced gardening in western Maine, unheated grow tunnels and hoop houses are going to be your best bet for table veggies; they extend the growing season to something you can work with.

    We live in a passive solar heated house, if you are thinking about that direction and want feedback, PM me. It's working well for us. For your plans, I could see a passive solar home and greenhouse augmented by a wood-fired boiler to provide in-floor radiant heat. A decent size boiler would also heat a workshop and take the chill off your hen house. Keeps the money sucking oil trucks away

    Have fun, Dave.
    "Those were the days my friend, we thought they'd never end ..."
    When there is a huge solar energy spill, it is called a "nice day"!

  10. #10
    Platinum Member DAY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    664
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Tractor
    Ford 4500 TLB, Kubota L2900GST

    Default Re: Big Multi Year Project About to Begin...help!

    Quote Originally Posted by dave1949 View Post
    From what I have seen and experienced gardening in western Maine, unheated grow tunnels and hoop houses are going to be your best bet for table veggies; they extend the growing season to something you can work with.
    .
    If you haven't already, become familiar with the work Elliot Coleman is doing in Maine.

Page 1 of 14 123411 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Geothermal Heat Pump Project
    By techman in forum Rural Living
    Replies: 73
    Last Post: 08-10-2014, 08:44 AM
  2. lucked out on the 1st big storm of the year
    By deere755 in forum Rural Living
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-02-2006, 12:48 PM
  3. GC2300 - How To Determine Year Model
    By CarlGlas in forum Massey Ferguson Owning/Operating
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 12-09-2005, 02:02 PM
  4. TC55DA First Year Experience
    By BadDog in forum New Holland Owning/Operating
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 06-21-2005, 02:38 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2014 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.