Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    23
    Location
    Fairfax, Virginia
    Tractor
    B2400

    Default Footings advice for shed on slope

    I staked out a 12X24 shed over the weekend for my kubota B2400. The
    location is on a small hill, the slope is such that the entrance will be level
    with the ground, but the back end will be about 4 ft. off the ground. I plan to
    use Quikrite form tubes filled with concrete for the footers. On the outer rim boards
    I'll space the footers every 6 feet. I also plan to have footers every 4 feet to support a pair
    of 4X6's located where the tractor's wheel base is. (During winter I have a FEL and blade
    attached, plus the tires are filled).

    I had been planning on using mostly 8 inch Quikrite tubes. But, in looking at how high
    the back end of the shed will sit, I'm now thinking 10 or 12 inches for the back end.

    I had been planning on 24 inch depth, as that is below the frost line. But, with the
    footers that are more than 3 feet above ground, I'm thinking of going deeper than
    24 inches, in order to provide more stability.

    The question I have is whether a 4 ft height aboveground for the footers is a bad idea.

    Any thoughts or experience out there? Many thanks!

    bill
    ---

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    5,673
    Location
    Cedartown, Ga and N. Ga mountains
    Tractor
    1998 Kubota B21, 2005 Kubota L39

    Default Re: Footings advice for shed on slope

    Bill,

    It may just be semantics but I would call the sono tubes columns rather than footers. If I were working on your plan I would dig below frost line a 2'x2'x8" footer with rebar protruding out of the top in the center of the footer. The sono tube would sit on top of the footing and also have rebar that is tied to the rebar protruding from the footings.

    You are going to be mixing a lot of concrete to fill that many tubes 5 or 6 feet from footer to beam. Can you get a backhoe in there and pour a perimeter footing with a block wall on top? Another alternative is to do your footings and bring the sono tubes to about 8" above grade. From there you could use 6x6 pressure treated up to the rim beam. That system would also let you run diagonal bracing from the bottom of the 6x6 to the rim beam for lateral stability.

    MarkV

  3. #3
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    19,399
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada

    Default Re: Footings advice for shed on slope

    What kind of soil are working on ?

    Egon

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    23
    Location
    Fairfax, Virginia
    Tractor
    B2400

    Default Re: Footings advice for shed on slope

    Mark,

    I like your suggestion of bringing the sono tubes up to 8" and then using
    6X6's up to the rim beam and using diagonal bracing for lateral stability.
    That is exactly the kind of idea I was hoping to learn about by posting
    my message. Thanks so much!

    bill
    ----

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    23
    Location
    Fairfax, Virginia
    Tractor
    B2400

    Default Re: Footings advice for shed on slope

    Egan,

    The soil is a mix of clay and 'hard' sand. It compacts reasonably well.

  6. #6
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    19,399
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada

    Default Re: Footings advice for shed on slope

    Just Thoughts That may repeat what has already been said. I am assumming you will be using ready mix. Remember the truck can come with extra chutes to extend its pour range and you can take advantage of the hillside elevation gain.

    Dig down three feet and pour a support base 16x 16x 8 inches thick integral with rebar and a 8 in. sona tube to the full height required. Or only extend the sona tube tube to a convienient height above ground. The full length sona tube will need support for pouring to keep it vertical. This would be an end bearing pile.

    Drill 9 inch holes to about four feet deep and insert sona tube a foot or so into the hole with full length rebar to the bottom of hole.. The height can be as before, either full length or just to a convienient level. Again the sona tube must be supported when pouring concrete to fill the hole. This would be called a friction pile. The larger the diameter of the hole below grade the more the pile will hold. It should only be used if there is good drainage on the site in question. Otherwise the depth would have to go down to solid soil not affected by water which will not be cost effective.

    Please note I am not an engineer and am making a guess at depths and sizes. Also make sure your rebar is spaced to accomodate the size of the aggragate used in the concrete.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    23
    Location
    Fairfax, Virginia
    Tractor
    B2400

    Default Re: Footings advice for shed on slope

    > From there you could use 6x6 pressure treated up to the rim beam.

    What would be the preferred method of connecting the 6X6's to the two 4X6's at
    a corner?

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    5,673
    Location
    Cedartown, Ga and N. Ga mountains
    Tractor
    1998 Kubota B21, 2005 Kubota L39

    Default Re: Footings advice for shed on slope

    Bryk, You see people just toe nail a joint like that but I would use the type of metal brackets sold for frame and deck work. Most of the Home Depot type stores have a large selection in the lumber area. Simpson Strong Ties are a brand you most often see www.STRONGTIE.COM their site will give you some ideas.

    MarkV

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2016 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.