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  1. #1
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    2011 Kioti DK45 HST

    Default Old stew pot restoration

    Good evening,
    I've recently come into possesion of an old cast iron wash pot or "stew pot" as they were know where I grew up. It has light rust but is not pitted or flaking. Any of you have experience in cleaning and re-seasoning the pot?
    Thanks
    RJJR
    2011 Kioti DK45 HST
    FEL & Wildkat Grapple

  2. #2
    Super Star Member
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    Default Re: Old stew pot restoration

    I have done this several times. You stated that it wasn't pitted. Just take a Brillo Pad and wash thoroughly, then dry. Get a paper towel with Crisco Shortening on it and cover the entire pot inside and out lightly with the Crisco. If it will fit in the oven, place it in the oven at 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Turn over and place back in oven for another 30 minutes at 350 degrees. Just make sure that you place Foil underneath the pot to collect any drippings.
    The PUPIL who does not surpass his Master, fails his Master.

  3. #3
    Super Member JB4310's Avatar
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    Default Re: Old stew pot restoration

    I have a few of cast iron pans and pots, Haven't used them in a long time, but I think they use olive oil to season them.

    JB
    JD 4310; E hydro, 300CX, 48 BH, 60" box, 72" rake, 72" rear blade, cast pallet forks, 48", 61"HD & 73" high volume bucket.
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  4. #4
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    Default Re: Old stew pot restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by creekbend View Post
    I have done this several times. You stated that it wasn't pitted. Just take a Brillo Pad and wash thoroughly, then dry. Get a paper towel with Crisco Shortening on it and cover the entire pot inside and out lightly with the Crisco. If it will fit in the oven, place it in the oven at 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Turn over and place back in oven for another 30 minutes at 350 degrees. Just make sure that you place Foil underneath the pot to collect any drippings.
    This will season the cast iron. If it needs additional seasoning, just repeat the process making sure that you cover any area that you might have previously missed. I have cooked with cast iron for over 40 years, and have left my pots outdoors after being used around salt water. They come out just like new. My 8 pieces of cast iron were given to my Wife and I some 40 years ago. They were 80 years old then. That makes them 120 years old.
    The PUPIL who does not surpass his Master, fails his Master.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Old stew pot restoration

    Olive oil is better than vegtable oils, but the best is flaxseed oil. Also you can't properly season cast ironware with only one application. After you have the pot clean, wipe a light coat of flaxseed oil inside and out and as mentioned place in a hot oven or on a stove burner over low heat. When it quits smoking, allow the pan to cool and repeat the application 8 or 10 times. In some cases more coats are needed. The ultimate goal is to build a smooth finish of baked on oil so the metal is not only protected, but is smooth as well.
    For example we have a large skillet that was my grandmothers, and seasoned in the manner above by my granddad. it has never had to be reseasoned and scrambled eggs for example slide right out after cooking, requiring only a wipe with a damp rag to clean the skillet after use.
    Speaking of cleaning cast iron, never put them in the dishwasher or a sink full of dishwater. Properly seasoned, all they require is wipe them out with a slightly damp rag or wipe them with a dry towel then a slightly oily (with flaxseed oil) paper towel then buff them with a dry towel.

  6. #6
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    loganville ga
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    wheel horse c-100

    Default Re: Old stew pot restoration

    by some chance did you stumble onto a syrup kettle anyway to post a picture

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Old stew pot restoration

    The percentage of early settlers that had access to olive oil or flaxseed oil was very low. The early settlers and Country and Mountain people of this Country almost solely relied on animal fat of vegetable oil to season their cast iron cookware. Research would reveal that bacon grease was used quite frequently. These are the products that I saw being used all my life. Wikipedia and this website revealed the same. How to Properly Season a Cast Iron Pan | eHow.com I am not suggesting that the others types of oils used and suggested by other members are not correct, but I am informing you of the method that I was taught and the methods that were the norm for the majority of people. Settlers transversing this Great Country from East to West even utilized bear grease that was used to grease the hubs on their wagons on their cast iron cookware. I will make one further statement: Once you start cooking with cast iron, you will rarely use anything different. When properly taken care of, cast iron is non-stick and can be easily cleaned with a cloth towel of paper towel. Thanks for listening.
    The PUPIL who does not surpass his Master, fails his Master.

  8. #8
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Default Re: Old stew pot restoration

    I've got some cast iron, supposedly pre-seasoned by the manufacturer, that I like to bake cornbread in. My cornbread would stick pretty badly. I tried seasoning it like the "experts" say with olive oil, and I tried using Great Value (generic PAM) spray and neither worked. I finally bought a small container of real LARD at the grocery store. My cornbread turns out great now. It worked for me; can't guarantee it for you.
    Bird

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Old stew pot restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by Bird View Post
    I've got some cast iron, supposedly pre-seasoned by the manufacturer, that I like to bake cornbread in. My cornbread would stick pretty badly. I tried seasoning it like the "experts" say with olive oil, and I tried using Great Value (generic PAM) spray and neither worked. I finally bought a small container of real LARD at the grocery store. My cornbread turns out great now. It worked for me; can't guarantee it for you.
    I bake cornbread at least once a week. My Family loves it. It is a staple in our menu. One question? Have you ever eaten baked cornbread mixed in a glass of milk?
    The PUPIL who does not surpass his Master, fails his Master.

  10. #10
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Default Re: Old stew pot restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by creekbend View Post
    I bake cornbread at least once a week. My Family loves it. It is a staple in our menu. One question? Have you ever eaten baked cornbread mixed in a glass of milk?
    Are you kidding? That was sometimes the whole meal when I was a kid and we had our own milk cow so more milk than we could use. And of course we didn't have air-conditioning, so Mother would bake a big skillet of cornbread and we'd eat it in glasses of milk out on the porch where it was cooler in the summer.

    And now . . . yep, I'll eat any leftover cornbread in a glass of milk for an evening snack.

    I've heard a lot of people talk about cornbread and buttermilk, but I just never acquired a taste for buttermilk. I prefer sweet milk.
    Bird

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