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  1. #1
    Silver Member
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    Kubota L3200

    Default Framing a house: 2X4 vs 2X6

    Hope to start sawing logs in the next week or two for lumber to frame my son's new house. I know most houses are framed with finished 2X4's, but I believe that is because of the cost of 2X6's. I've got plenty of clear pine to cut all the 2X6's I would need. I live in NW FL and the winters are mild and the summers really hot for 2 months. Would there be any real "thermo" advantage to using 2X6's? I know structurally it would be stronger than 2X4 outside walls.

    Anyone here ever frame a house with rough cut 2X6's?

    tks in advance,
    Chain Bender


  2. #2
    Veteran Member wedge40's Avatar
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    Default Re: Framing a house: 2X4 vs 2X6

    Quote Originally Posted by Chain Bender View Post
    Hope to start sawing logs in the next week or two for lumber to frame my son's new house. I know most houses are framed with finished 2X4's, but I believe that is because of the cost of 2X6's. I've got plenty of clear pine to cut all the 2X6's I would need. I live in NW FL and the winters are mild and the summers really hot for 2 months. Would there be any real "thermo" advantage to using 2X6's? I know structurally it would be stronger than 2X6 outside walls.

    Anyone here ever frame a house with rough cut 2X6's?

    tks in advance,
    Chain Bender
    I believe in some nothern states it is now required to frame with 2x6.

    Wedge
    1967 Ford 4000,Mahindra 4530 with FEL and BH, Box blade, straight blade, FEL, Rake, Bushhog, Backhoe, Jinma chipper, KKII tiller, Grapple. Mahindra 4530, with FEL and Backhoe.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Framing a house: 2X4 vs 2X6

    Obviously, 2x6 construction will give you much more space for increased insulation installation. I don't think that's your problem. I framed a workshop in DeLand Fl with rought cut pine 2x4 that I stacked, dried and had pressure treated. When the inspector came for framing inspection, he said "no heat
    I see". I asked him what he was talking about, and he showed me in the Florida Bldg Code, that unless framing lumber has a kiln dried stamp on it, you cannot heat the structure. Says the heat brings the bugs out of the lumber. I argued that it had been pressure treated, didn't cut any ice, had to agree that there would be no heat. Had to wait a couple of months after final to install the heat and air, so be careful.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Framing a house: 2X4 vs 2X6

    Boy don't I hope that has changed. Wouldn't matter if it was a 2X4 or a 2X12 if that's the case. Not sure where the nearest kiln is around here. But I will be tryng to find out in just a few minutes.

    Tks for tks heads up. This certainly changes the price of a new house!

    C. Bender

  5. #5
    Elite Member
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    Grayson County, TX
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    Default Re: Framing a house: 2X4 vs 2X6

    Two things to worry about (1) The lumber is properly dried, otherwise it will warp and twist and really mess up the house, and (2) that the lumber dimensions are standard 1.5" x "5.5", otherwise this could make the construction project more difficult. Otherwise 2 x 6 is good for strength and because you can put more insulation in there.
    Alan L., TX
    South of Bugtussle
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    We don't rent pigs.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Framing a house: 2X4 vs 2X6

    it's code up here since the 80s I think. 2x6's on outside walls.

    Its nice actually, lots more insulation and stiffer. If you have the means do the 2x6's - but make sure hey are 5.5 otherwise it will become a pain when you start with door frames and so on.

    sounds like the biggest thing will be the kiln drying problem though.

  7. #7
    Veteran Member
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    Default Re: Framing a house: 2X4 vs 2X6

    Your plumber will thank you.
    Regards,

    Artisan

    Kubota 2012 BX25 (23H.P. / 17.7pto)
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  8. #8
    Silver Member dschuffert's Avatar
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    Default Re: Framing a house: 2X4 vs 2X6

    I built a new house almost two years ago (December 2010). I used 2X6's for the outside walls instead of the 2X4's originally called for in the blueprint. According to my architect this gave me some structural advantages on the spans along with it met the requirements for my insulation requirements (1.5 inches of foam and then the remaining in wet cellulose). The insulation characteristics worked out well the last two winters (2010 and 2011) with the Geothermal unit, which is completely dependent on the homes insulation, kept the house very warm for no more than $50 per month in electricity to simply run the fan and heat-pump.
    2012 John Deere 3720 Deluxe Cab, 300CX Loader w/ 73" HD Bucket, Artillian Forks, 681 Tiller, 72D AutoConnect Mower, 59" Two-stage Snow Blower, Ballast Box, Frontier TR2058 Overseeder, Frontier SS2067B Broadcast
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  9. #9
    Platinum Member Iowachild's Avatar
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    Default Re: Framing a house: 2X4 vs 2X6

    When I built my 24' X 36' seasonal home, I went with 2x4's as it is heated with wood, unheated when no one is there, and framed with 2x6's would have cost me 20 sq. ft. of floor space. Just my
    MIKE

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    "Iowa Child" by Sarah Hall Manley

  10. #10
    Elite Member
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    Bedford, VA
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    Default Re: Framing a house: 2X4 vs 2X6

    Here in VA with our milder winters our builder didnt think we would see that much of a savings, BUT I wish we would have used the 2x6 for at least the outside walls..

    I like 'dschuffert' idea of the 2x6 with some foam insulation.. I wish we had also done some foam insulation


    Brian
    Bedford, VA
    2320 w/ 62D MMM, 200CX FEL, Pats EZ Change, LX4 Cutter
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