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  1. #171
    Platinum Member tkappeler's Avatar
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    Hainesport, NJ
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    TYM T293

    Default Re: New Home Begins

    Quote Originally Posted by mjncad View Post
    ... but you might need to rent a plate compactor to get the edges the roller can't get to.

    ... I don't like living in a basement ...
    I will most likely rent a jumping jack for a week when it gets to that point to help in that area. As for living in a basement, I agree, but it makes a good place for my daughter to have privacy ... I mean a good place for her to go to think she is having privacy but is really a place for her to go so when she has friends over or when she is watching a movie that we don't want to hear or when we all just need some space.
    Tom

    "Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work" - Thomas A. Edison

  2. #172
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    Default Re: New Home Begins

    Nice looking job on the walls!

    I guess it depends on the area and what you are used to. I have never lived in a house with no basement but we also have never had any out buildings or garage. I had a nice work area in my parents basement and practically lived down there.

  3. #173
    Platinum Member cartod's Avatar
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    Northern, West Virginia
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    JD 3320, 820,400,255

    Default Re: New Home Begins

    Can you please tell me the main reason you chose the superior basement? We are breaking ground in march.

  4. #174
    Platinum Member tkappeler's Avatar
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    Default Re: New Home Begins

    Quote Originally Posted by cartod View Post
    Can you please tell me the main reason you chose the superior basement? We are breaking ground in march.
    .

    There were several factors that we considered. None was a clear winner, but when considered in total, nudged the decision to use Superior Walls.

    1) Unknown soil and water issues when we were in the design phase.

    2) They guarantee a dry basement for 15 years. I could not get that kind of guarantee from anyone else.

    3) Faster install. Ok, you can say that poured walls would be only a few days later especially since we went with a poured footing anyway, but I do save on time in other areas such as insulating. Given that I am doing much of the work after rough framing, spending 1 week of evenings after work just to do the insulation is one week I could be doing something else.

    4) Given the amount of backfill I will be doing, code says I have to go to 10" poured walls if I want to backfill higher than 6'. That is 25% more concrete, which is a 25% in increase in material cost. I can go higher on backfill with superior due to the engineering and their certifications as such.

    5) Cost. See #4. In addition, if I wanted to go to 9' walls the same as superior, that cost extra for form work as well as material. The additional costs in these scenarios reduces the additional up front costs of superior walls.

    6) Easier mechanical installation. I will put plywood up to secure mechanicals (electric, plumbing, home entertainment, etc) and I can simply screw to the galvanized rib/stud. if poured concrete, I have to drill/tapcon or similar. In addition, there will be about a dozen outlets 48" up in the basement and running the electric for outlets is easier as they have raceways poured in already. Attaching them to the ribs is easier too.

    7) If we choose to finish any portion of the basement, I can simply screw the drywall to the ribs. I won't have to build a wall inside the walls or add stringers to nail too as I would have to do if it was poured concrete.

    As I said, none of these is a compelling reason on it's own. But add them all together and it tipped the scale.

    BTW: We went with the 9' tall walls as the stone and slab will reduce the overall height by 8" and I would not want to loose that much from an 8' wall.
    Tom

    "Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work" - Thomas A. Edison

  5. #175
    Platinum Member cartod's Avatar
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    Default Re: New Home Begins

    Wow, thank you for taking the time to type all of that. When I did my research on the superior basement the biggest selling feature was the warranty. What was your cost difference vs. a poured wall?

  6. #176
    Platinum Member tkappeler's Avatar
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    Default Re: New Home Begins

    Quote Originally Posted by cartod View Post
    Wow, thank you for taking the time to type all of that. When I did my research on the superior basement the biggest selling feature was the warranty. What was your cost difference vs. a poured wall?
    The gross difference of poured walls was about $8,000 for 8" walls, about $10,000 if we had to go to 10" walls. Subtract out the insulation that I would have had to do and you are looking at a net difference of about $5,000 to $7,000. This does not include putting a value on my time for any of the other time consuming aspects mentioned above.

    I have learned so much from other here at TBN, that I want to be able to help others out in any way I can, so I am happy to provide details, my experience and even mistakes if it helps others.

    EDIT: Had the numbers reversed.
    Tom

    "Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work" - Thomas A. Edison

  7. #177
    Platinum Member cartod's Avatar
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    Default Re: New Home Begins

    I am looking at 9' basement walls and between now and march I will decide which route to go. Water is really not a factor where I am building so I am keeping an open mind. Again, thanks for the response and can't wait to watch your build.

  8. #178
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    Default Re: New Home Begins

    What was the purpose of the little square pads they set the walls on? Are they still under there and how do they seal the bottom joint?

  9. #179
    Platinum Member tkappeler's Avatar
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    Default Re: New Home Begins

    Quote Originally Posted by 955Lincoln View Post
    What was the purpose of the little square pads they set the walls on? Are they still under there and how do they seal the bottom joint?
    The pads are dense ABS and are shims as no footing is ever exactly level. They do not use steel as it will eventually rust In fact, they take the high point and still add shims under there. They want a small gap. When it is done, they build a little dam both inside and out and pour a 5000 psi non shrinking grout into all around and let it come out the other side, insuring that the gap is completely filled.

    Here is a picture showing the gap and they have poured the grout in. The depth of the grout is about 2". After they completed the inside, they inspected the outside to make sure it was completely filled and added more where necessary.
    -p1020134-jpg

    Keep in mind that if this was a gravel footing, water would flow through to the drain anyway. This gap is 8" under finished floor ... 4" slab and 4" stone.
    Tom

    "Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work" - Thomas A. Edison

  10. #180
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    Default Re: New Home Begins

    Quote Originally Posted by tkappeler View Post
    The pads are dense ABS and are shims as no footing is ever exactly level. They do not use steel as it will eventually rust In fact, they take the high point and still add shims under there. They want a small gap. When it is done, they build a little dam both inside and out and pour a 5000 psi non shrinking grout into all around and let it come out the other side, insuring that the gap is completely filled.

    Here is a picture showing the gap and they have poured the grout in. The depth of the grout is about 2". After they completed the inside, they inspected the outside to make sure it was completely filled and added more where necessary.
    -p1020134-jpg

    Keep in mind that if this was a gravel footing, water would flow through to the drain anyway. This gap is 8" under finished floor ... 4" slab and 4" stone.
    Very cool. For a gravel footer I guess they just have to make the gravel level and not use the pads?

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