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  1. #11
    Bronze Member
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    Nov 2012
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    Parrottsville TN
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    Kubota

    Default Re: basement kitchen plumbing

    BTW the check in the illustration above is not the check I'm referring to......that check only stops the back flow of waste to the pump.....that which it just pumped out.
    There is another check that is installed right before the tie-in to the existing waste line, there are a couple of versions but look at the gate-check and it will be in the 3" line out, not the 2" pump line as shown.

  2. #12
    Elite Member whistlepig's Avatar
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    4,258
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    Preble County, Ohio
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    Kubota B7800 with FEL

    Default Re: basement kitchen plumbing

    We have a sump pump in our basement for a sink and it also pumps out the discharge when our water softener flushes itself. It pumps straight up about 8'. A check valve about 2' above the pump. The pump is one of these:

    50 Series | Zoeller Pump Company
    I used to do the Hokey Pokey but I turned myself around.

  3. #13
    Super Member mjncad's Avatar
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    Default Re: basement kitchen plumbing

    Quote Originally Posted by obb View Post
    You will need what they call a septic sump pump they're not cheap by the way and they are little difficult to get put in I will attach a picture of one for you....... good luckAttachment 302444
    Around here they're called ejector pits; but they are similar to the drawing you attached, except...

    They aren't tied into the house perimeter drain. They don't discharge to atmosphere. They consist of a pit, the drain enters the pit below the floor, the discharge with check valve exits up to a sanitary-sewer drain, an atmospheric vent pipe (either separate or tied into the existing system) services the pit, a grinder/macerator pump with a float switch takes care of moving the glop in the pit.

    Quote Originally Posted by teejk View Post
    I think a "grinder" pump is what they are called. Very typical in basement bathroom retro-fits. And as noted above, they don't look cheap!
    Quote Originally Posted by davedj1 View Post
    They make some that don't require digging them down in. They can go under a cabinet/counter. They are referred to as macerator pumps.
    I just installed a small version for a shower only, it sit's under the cabinet.
    Products for adaptable grinders
    Regardless of whether or not you intend to dump any food scraps down the drain; I'd bet code will require a grinder/macerator pump.

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkV View Post
    Randy you have two things going on, in my mind. First you mentioned inspection, that is where you need to start and ask what they require. It does not matter what will get by if you have to be inspected. Second, don't ever use the words "commercial" or "production" when you talk to an inspector or apply for a permit. Those words get into a whole different set of rules. Now if you are planning on doing anything to sell, then that brings up a bunch more issues. Good-luck.

    MarkV
    I agree with Mark wholeheartedly on this one. Please don't take this the wrong way; but having the sink empty into an above floor sump just under the sink sounds pretty redneck to me, and I doubt very much that will go over at all well with any inspector.

    In my opinion, most inspectors are overworked and underpaid, and if they have cravings of power and didn't get laid recently; they can be a royal pain to deal with. Don't volunteer too much information, don't argue with them, play dumb and ask them to educate you if they fail something. Don't be surprised if they fail something as I swear they get bonus points with their bosses for bringing in more revenue via re-inspection fees.


    Quote Originally Posted by lsmurphy View Post
    Do NOT...........DO NOT! forget your check valve!!!!!!!!!
    Your upstairs waste lines MUST be separated from your new lower waste lines by a check valve...........3" check........ask for it at your plumbing supply.
    If your upstairs backs up.......the first place it will go is your basement.....trust me......I know.
    I hate to admit it; but I was a bad boy and removed the check valve from the 2" discharge line because it made such a loud banging noise when the ejector pit pump shut off. The design of the valve is such that it doesn't open to full port size. Maybe I should look into a larger check valve that will open completely.
    Paraphrasing Douglas Adams - So long and thanks for all the bacon.

  4. #14
    Veteran Member
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    Jul 2005
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    Southwest VA

    Default Re: basement kitchen plumbing

    the inspector is not a building inspector or plumbing inspector, he would just be the guy from VDACS (VA dept of agricutlture and consumer services) verifying that the kitchen is usable as a certified kitchen. being redneck would be running the drain pipe to daylight and letting it drain into the woods. this is my first option and i expect that the vdacs guy doesn't really care about the plumbing or the drainage but cares more that the kitchen is pet free (the pets are the reason this needs to be built in the first place) and the water is clean and the preparation surfaces can be cleaned. the water has been tested and is fine. i don't care much about adhering to code, just looking for something that will work. just trying to cover the situation if he asks about the drainage system. i would call him and ask if he looks at that at all but that would guarantee that this time he would look.
    the waste water would just consist of either plain water or the grey water from washing preparation equipment.

  5. #15
    Veteran Member Deere Dude's Avatar
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    Hee Haw He!!, TN
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    John Deere 3720

    Default Re: basement kitchen plumbing

    Why do you have to get it inspected if it is just for personal use? What they don't know won't hurt them.
    JD 3720 with R4s
    X740

  6. #16
    Super Member mjncad's Avatar
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    Default Re: basement kitchen plumbing

    Randy:

    How about having a buddy call VDACS and ask them about inspection requirements, or call from a buddy's place so your number doesn't show up on their caller I.D.?

    Personally I wouldn't ASSume the VDACS guy is not going to care about how you have your kitchen's plumbing is setup. He may very well flag it for further inspection by whomever handles plumbing inspections in your area if he thinks something doesn't look right.

    If you're looking to get VDACS blessing, you must have some sort of commercial plans in mind with your pasta making venture. If you're just doing this for you and your family, you wouldn't be asking for opinions and advice from the forum.

    Just remember, commercial of any kind adds liability and added Gummint scrutiny, and if something bad happened to a customer, whether buying your pasta directly from you or from a restaurant, you can bet that there will be a dam lawyer out there willing to sue your butt.
    Paraphrasing Douglas Adams - So long and thanks for all the bacon.

  7. #17
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    Southwest VA

    Default Re: basement kitchen plumbing

    this is a fresh pasta business started by my wife a couple of months ago. we sell it at the farmers market and also have a wholesale customer. we think that she could easily have 3 or 4 more wholesale customers, and the sales at the farmers market will only get better as the weather gets better. yes, we go to the market in winter too.she has been using the rescue squad kitchen which is just up the road. it was inspected by the vdacs guy and is available for community use. the problem is that the door is kept locked and my wife has to chase down the key every time she wants to use the kitchen. the chase is not always successful.
    looks like i'm going to spend the money to do this right. at least this way maybe i will only have to do this once.

  8. #18
    Super Member mjncad's Avatar
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    Default Re: basement kitchen plumbing

    I wish you and your wife all the best with this venture. I have no idea how strict Virginia is about building codes; but I suspect they are far more intrusive than Oklahoma where a TBN member built a house and the only permit he had to get was for his septic system.

    Ask them bureaucrats questions, get the information up front so you don't get any nasty surprises later. I hope you've talked to your insurance agent too.
    Paraphrasing Douglas Adams - So long and thanks for all the bacon.

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