Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Platinum Member ustmd's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    559
    Location
    Manor, TX (outside of Austin)
    Tractor
    Kioti CK25

    Default Best Way to Fix Rafters

    So I am building an outdoor "kitchen"--really a shade and rain structure for the grill. I am using rough cut Western Red Cedar--some purchased new, some reused from other projects.

    I am putting a metal roof on part of the structure and that is where I made a rookie mistake. The rafters are 2 x 6. After I got them up, toe nailed in and hurricane clips installed, I realized that the rafters vary +/- 3/16 to 1/4" in width. The differences are enough that if I just put the roof up "as is" the wavy roof line will, to paraphrase my mother, stick out like a women of questionable virtue in a house of worship.

    So here is my question, do I take the rafters down and rip them to the same width or just try to shim the purlins to correct for the unevenness?

    Taking the rafters down, means pulling the galvanized, ring shank that I used for the toe nails and taking off the hurricane clips. NOrmally not an issue, but since this is cedar, it is pretty soft and most likely the rafters wold take a beating.

    Shimming the purlins, means keeping all of the purlins level in two planes (across the rafters for each purlin and from purlin to purlin) which may mean its own set hassles. This is my first time installing purlins, so this may be a normal situation

    Thoughts, feedback? Which way would you go?

    Here a few pictures of the current build.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -rafters-1-jpg   -rafters-3-jpg  

  2. #2
    Platinum Member Raspy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    976
    Location
    Northern Nevada
    Tractor
    NH TC29DA Bolens G14 Skytrac 5028 Dodge Cummins Jeep Rubicon Grizzly 700

    Default Re: Best Way to Fix Rafters

    Could you just plane the higher ones to match the rest, with a power planer. I'm assuming you mean they are too high, rather than too thick, in other words the "6" dimension varies. Taking them down seems like a lot of work and a lot of damage.
    John

    I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt.

  3. #3
    Elite Member smstonypoint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    4,142
    Location
    SC (Upstate) & NC (Piedmont)
    Tractor
    NH TN 55, Kubota B2320 & RTV 900, Bad Boy Outlaw 61" ZTR

    Default Re: Best Way to Fix Rafters

    Quote Originally Posted by ustmd View Post

    Shimming the purlins, means keeping all of the purlins level in two planes (across the rafters for each purlin and from purlin to purlin) which may mean its own set hassles. This is my first time installing purlins, so this may be a normal situation
    I am no expert, but I would try the shimming route. It seems to me that you could use string lines to maintain level without too much hassle.

    Steve

  4. #4
    Bronze Member mehig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    54
    Location
    fort knox , kentucky
    Tractor
    challenger mt265b

    Default Re: Best Way to Fix Rafters

    I would lay purlins across the top and simply notch out the rafters so the purlins are straight and level

  5. #5
    Gold Member BuilderML's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    387
    Location
    Tolland, CT
    Tractor
    CCY SX3100

    Default Re: Best Way to Fix Rafters

    When working with regular 2x lumber the crown alone will be beyond 1/4" in height some times. In your case forget taking them down. Do like listed above plane down the high spots and/or shim the low spots. If your thinking taking them down to run them on the table saw which will give you the same result as just taking the planer to them without having to remove them. You could also find your two lowest rafters and use that to set your height and notch the high ones to set your purlins. By no means do you need to make them exact to each other. Lay a straight edge across all of them to see how bad they really are and adjust from there, some of the ones you measure thicker may not be that bad due to the crown of others. Start at the top with your straight edge and work your way down. You have a few options to "blend" everything in.
    Have fun.

  6. #6
    Super Star Member EddieWalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    15,451
    Location
    Tyler, Texas
    Tractor
    Several, all used and abused.

    Default Re: Best Way to Fix Rafters

    I would get a straight edge on top of the rafters and either notch, sand or shave them in place, depending on how far I needed to go.

    Seems like kind of a shame to have to see the underside of the metal through the purlins with that nice cedar you are using. Have you considered a wood ceiling and then laying 30 pound felt paper on it and installing the metal on top? I did one where I just put 2x8's across my rafters as tight as I could get them, then plywood on top of the 2x8's with screws going through the plywood, into the 2x8's. Then I shingled the roof. The final result was very nice from below and above.

    Eddie

  7. #7
    Super Star Member EddieWalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    15,451
    Location
    Tyler, Texas
    Tractor
    Several, all used and abused.

    Default Re: Best Way to Fix Rafters

    I would get a straight edge on top of the rafters and either notch, sand or shave them in place, depending on how far I needed to go.

    Seems like kind of a shame to have to see the underside of the metal through the purlins with that nice cedar you are using. Have you considered a wood ceiling and then laying 30 pound felt paper on it and installing the metal on top? I did one where I just put 2x8's across my rafters as tight as I could get them, then plywood on top of the 2x8's with screws going through the plywood, into the 2x8's. Then I shingled the roof. The final result was very nice from below and above.

    Eddie

  8. #8
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    336
    Location
    Pomona Park Florida
    Tractor
    Yanmar EX450, Ford 8N/2N, Case 580C backhoe, Massey 185

    Default Re: Best Way to Fix Rafters

    I'd just go ahead and put the metal on. I don't think you'll notice that small difference from the ground. If you do, you're pretty picky. Women of questionable virtue need church too!!!

  9. #9
    Gold Member paulwestski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    299
    Location
    VA Beach & Amherst, VA
    Tractor
    Kubota L4240

    Default

    3x on the notching
    Standard procedure
    When ever you cut rafters you should cut the first one, test it and then use it for the pattern.
    Always keep the pattern flush with the top of the rafters.
    Kubota L4240 HST+ R-4's,

  10. #10
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    314
    Location
    Southern Maine
    Tractor
    Kubota B2320

    Default Re: Best Way to Fix Rafters

    Use a string line across the peak and across the eave on each side. Mark heights to the string line, then use a chalk line on the high rafters peak to eave. Either power plane or use a sawzall to remove the higher ones.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. How to fix this?
    By steveessie in forum Build-It Yourself
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 02-24-2013, 09:37 PM
  2. bargain transfer fix instead of some hazardous farmer fix
    By buickanddeere in forum Rural Living
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-03-2012, 05:12 PM
  3. Replies: 34
    Last Post: 01-11-2012, 10:29 PM
  4. What is it and how do I fix it?
    By ljc61801 in forum Attachments
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-07-2011, 02:01 PM
  5. How do I fix this?
    By Laminarman in forum Projects
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 05-11-2004, 10:36 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2014 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.