Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
  1. #1
    Platinum Member Dadnatron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    810
    Location
    Versailles, KY
    Tractor
    JD 5100e with FEL

    Default To sheath or not to sheath, that is my question.

    I am building a mid to upper level horse barn for thoroughbreds. I have the design and layout and am now trying to spec it as well as possible in order to get accurate and comparable bids. I've spoken with several contractors and there seems to be a wide range of what is best, necessary, or nice.

    The barn is a T-shaped barn, long axis is 120' with small 14' portion jutting out from the center for a small aisle and additional space and central entrance. Overall, there is approximately 10,000 sqft of roof space, with a simple hip roof design at a roughly 9/12 slope.

    My question is whether I should sheath the roof or not. One builder believes in using sheathing and Snap-Lock type metal roofing without any exposed fasteners. I admit I like this thinking a lot, however, the sheathing alone will add $10,000 in materials + labor and I don't know how much of a premium the metal roofing system would add.

    Another builder believes it is best/adequate to simply use the Double-bubble type reflective roll insulation over purlins and lay the metal roof directly on top, securing with screws. This is how he built his own barn, which I've been in.

    I'm not sure what the overall cost difference will be nor the benefits/problems associated with each comparably. Barn is in Kentucky. Air tightness is NOT an issue, again, the barn is designed to ventilate very well. But it will have some large animals in it so there 'could' be a humidity difference in/out at times, especially on very cold winter days/nights.

    1. What is your opinion on whether it is worth it to sheath a barn designed to be well ventilated?
    2. If no sheathing, is the 'Double-bubble' insulation useful/adequate?
    3. Is there a 'heat' worry if there is no sheathing/ventilation of metal? ie will my barn become an oven?
    4. How 'loud' is a metal roof without sheathing, in a rainstorm? Does the sheathing mitigate that issue to a useful degree?
    5. Without sheathing, I don't think the 'invisible fastener' metal roof systems can be used. I don't want to deal with leaking screws for the rest of my life if I can reasonably address it now. Are these systems worth the cost?

    To sheath or not to sheath, that is my question.-barn-capture-1a-jpg

  2. #2
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    138
    Location
    Pembroke, Ontario
    Tractor
    Kubota L3400

    Default Re: To sheath or not to sheath, that is my question.

    subscribing... cause a barn is in my future. and If I can learn anything from this I'll be happy

    I plan on a metal roof, but have never seen/dealt with one with hidden fasteners.

    I'd find the roofing material you want to use, and figure out what the manufacturer recommends.

  3. #3
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    4,008
    Location
    nicholson, pa
    Tractor
    John Deer 318

    Default Re: To sheath or not to sheath, that is my question.

    When you say snap-lock metal roofing, is this stone coated metal shingles? If so do not use them, there are a lot of recalls on the stone falling off the shingle. I looked into them a few years ago.
    www.stormspoons.com my website
    http://www.etsy.com/people/Forgeblast?ref=pr_profile
    Is where I also have spoons listed.

  4. #4
    Super Member newbury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    9,119
    Location
    From Vt, in Va, retiring to MS
    Tractor
    Kubota's - B7610, M4700

    Default Re: To sheath or not to sheath, that is my question.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dadnatron View Post
    <snip>
    1. What is your opinion on whether it is worth it to sheath a barn designed to be well ventilated?
    2. If no sheathing, is the 'Double-bubble' insulation useful/adequate?
    3. Is there a 'heat' worry if there is no sheathing/ventilation of metal? ie will my barn become an oven?
    4. How 'loud' is a metal roof without sheathing, in a rainstorm? Does the sheathing mitigate that issue to a useful degree?
    5. Without sheathing, I don't think the 'invisible fastener' metal roof systems can be used. I don't want to deal with leaking screws for the rest of my life if I can reasonably address it now. Are these systems worth the cost?
    I've only got about 5K sq ft of metal roof in northeast Mississippi.
    Where I have insulation it changes the sound of a heavy rainstorm from unbearable to painful. Try and find a neighbor where you can experience a heavy rainstorm under an uninsulated metal roof.
    I'm going to have to replace/rescrew about a 60x30 section because of leaking screws.
    Also water condenses on the inside of metal roofs, uninsulated it may rain inside.
    My rides - '95 Kubota M4700 w/ PEC, LA1001 FEL :'07 B7610, LA352 FEL, Bush Hog SBX 48 box blade, '09 Woods BH70-X w/ 16" bucket and thumb, 3pt pallet forks, Dale Phillips PHD, Jinma 8" chipper, 2 Piranha's, Winco 12KW PTO generator, Howse plow, 5' KK tiller, 5' Big Bee cutter, with a 2002 7.3L Ford F350 CC DRW 4x4 and '07 18' Hudson HSE Deluxe trailer - 5 Ton to haul it all
    My saws - 12" B&D 40 volt,JD CS 62, efco 3500, Stihls - 021, 660 w/woods mod, 660 w/ DP muffler, 088, Woodmizer LT10

  5. #5
    Platinum Member Dadnatron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    810
    Location
    Versailles, KY
    Tractor
    JD 5100e with FEL

    Default Re: To sheath or not to sheath, that is my question.

    This is the 'Snap-lock' roofing system that one builder recommends. He says the biggest issue he sees with metal roofing on barns is the leaks and drips around screws. Since he's gone to this style, he says he has not had any issues at all.

    What is an 'economical' way to insulate (purely for pouring rain sound) a metal roof? Is there a way to do it without breaking the bank? I am not interested in spray foam under the sheathing, my wife would never go for that look.

    Snap Lock Metal Roof Installation - YouTube

  6. #6
    Super Member newbury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    9,119
    Location
    From Vt, in Va, retiring to MS
    Tractor
    Kubota's - B7610, M4700

    Default Re: To sheath or not to sheath, that is my question.

    My roofer used foam that cam in large rolls.
    My rides - '95 Kubota M4700 w/ PEC, LA1001 FEL :'07 B7610, LA352 FEL, Bush Hog SBX 48 box blade, '09 Woods BH70-X w/ 16" bucket and thumb, 3pt pallet forks, Dale Phillips PHD, Jinma 8" chipper, 2 Piranha's, Winco 12KW PTO generator, Howse plow, 5' KK tiller, 5' Big Bee cutter, with a 2002 7.3L Ford F350 CC DRW 4x4 and '07 18' Hudson HSE Deluxe trailer - 5 Ton to haul it all
    My saws - 12" B&D 40 volt,JD CS 62, efco 3500, Stihls - 021, 660 w/woods mod, 660 w/ DP muffler, 088, Woodmizer LT10

  7. #7
    Elite Member zzvyb6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,589
    Location
    michigan
    Tractor
    jd 1070

    Default Re: To sheath or not to sheath, that is my question.

    If it's filled with horses, keep in mind they give off LARGE amounts of water vapor. That means condensation, especially in winter. If you keep your hay in this barn (usually above the stalls), the hay will absorb a lot of this moisture and bales on the bottom layer will mold. Ventilation, mosquitoe, mice and bird entry considerations pay off in the end, too. My upper deck and roof is sheathed. This also helps keep the structural integrity sound. For a metal roof, the noise of roof panels 'itching' would drive me crazy. I have asphalt shingles and they stay put. Plan your barn for waterline repairs, manure management, arena viewing, pasture access, lockable tool storage, boarder lockers, safe electrical paths, a concrete main aisle, a toilet and wash stand, replaceable stall siding and kick walls and trailer access and storage. Have a separate building for tractors, mowers and leaf blowers (anything with fuel). Otherwise in 10 - 15 years it will be just another beat up, chewed up, dusty, mildewed, sagging outbuilding with a nice weather vane on the cupola. The costs should be allocated to future value, not looks or appearance.

    Remember the old addage: "No Roof, No Barn" ?
    There is no "I" in team, but there is a "Me" if you want to jumble it up a bit...

  8. #8
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    2,445
    Location
    Guin, AL
    Tractor
    Kubota L3200 DT w/LA524 FEL, Loaded rear tires, LP RCR 1860 5' Cutter, LP RTA 1258 5' Tiller, LP PFL 2042 Pallet Forks w/60" Extensions, KK BB60 Box Blade, KK PHD-12" Post Hole Digger

    Default Re: To sheath or not to sheath, that is my question.

    All the homes in this area have the snap lock metal roofs.

    My barn of 100' x 36', ex horse barn, has the normal non-insulated metal roof with screws.

    As Newbury stated, it can "rain" a little inside.

    The big pain is that over the years the screws have to be replaced to prevent leaks at the screw holes.
    US Air Force Retired (1966-1988) ... mike

    Kubota TG1860G w/RCK54TG
    24 HP V-Twin Pro Yard Tractor
    Ohio Steel 12.5 cu. ft. Poly Swivel Dump Cart

  9. #9
    Super Star Member EddieWalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    19,380
    Location
    Tyler, Texas
    Tractor
    Several, all used and abused.

    Default Re: To sheath or not to sheath, that is my question.

    I'm not familiar with the term "snap lock" for metal roofs, but from looking at the video, it seems like a standing seam roof, which I am familiar with. If that's what it is, then you have no choice, you have to use sheathing to create a deck to attach the metal to. Purlins would be too far apart and I don't believe the metal is strong enough to span anything. What did your supplier say?

    The only time you would consider bubble insulation is if you have purlins. The bubble stuff doesn't really provide any significant insulation other then cutting down on condensation that forms on the underside of the metal. The condensation will still form, but it will be less. What comes off of the metal roof will land on the plastic and either flow down to your eaves and into your gutters, or down the sides of your walls. This can cause other issues if not addressed. If you use plastic, but the very best out there because if it falls apart, the only way to fix it is removing the metal roof and doing it all over again.

    If you go with R panels, then you can use purlins and space your trusses out a lot farther. How far depends on your trusses. Fewer trusses, purlins instead of sheathing and R panels create a very good roof for the very least amount of money. This is how I did my barn and my shop. When it rains, the metal is loud. If we are uncertain if it's sprinkling or not, we open the door to the shop and we can hear the lights sprinkle hitting the metal.

  10. #10
    Gold Member Milo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    357
    Location
    Preston County, WV
    Tractor
    Kubota B2650, JD X310, Polaris Ranger 500

    Default Re: To sheath or not to sheath, that is my question.

    Both Standing Seam (snap lock), and 29-26 gauge G-rib, R-rib, etc. which have exposed surface screws can be installed over 24" purlins or furring strips and will support walking on. I just finished a G-rib metal roof over an old roof (on a 125+ year house on the property I was considering tearing down) that was on purlins. In the interest of saving money and not having the attic open this time of the year we installed furring strips across the old existing metal roof and put the new surface screw panels on that. The installers walked all over it with no denting or issues of any kind and it was just 29 gauge. All standing seam or snap lock metal I've seen is much heavier gauge than what I used, maybe 22 or even heavier. I would also use the type like in the video which incorporates the faint rib bends in the wide panel rather than completely flat.... unless you go with "very" heavy gauge otherwise it'll show ripples.

    Standing seam is over double the price of surface screw roofing, maybe triple, and it requires a nice flat surface without bellies or humps. Given you're on new construction I'd definitely choose "snap-lock" for a home or nice new horse barn and I'd probably have OSB under it.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-08-2016, 05:23 AM
  2. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-20-2015, 08:41 PM
  3. Cable / cable sheath replace/repair.
    By CobyRupert in forum Owning/Operating
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-18-2015, 12:09 PM
  4. Rifel Sheath Anyone?
    By dtperk in forum Yanmar
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 10-23-2011, 08:38 AM
  5. finished my Knife and Sheath
    By Jeff Lary in forum Build-It Yourself
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 03-11-2011, 04:28 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2018 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.