Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    46
    Location
    Chelsea, MI USA
    Tractor
    Kioti CK30

    Default Slag for Driveway

    I am planning to put in a 650 ft long driveway. I am currently exploring the various materials available in my area. One of the resources am using is:

    Edward Levy

    I would like to put a good stable base of 21AA crushed concrete, slag or limestone 6"-8" deep. My questions are:

    Has anyone used slag and does it give off any smell (dry or wet)? Do the SY coverage/compacted depths/tonnages for the individual 21AA materials on this website seem reasonable?

  2. #2
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    1,386
    Location
    michigan thumb
    Tractor
    jd 970, JD GT235

    Default Re: Slag for Driveway

    That is the best material reference site I have seen.

    I use slag sand under brick pavers/flagstone and have never noticed any smell.

    using 3200 lbs/cu yd which is probably measured loose, weight estimates seem good.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    90
    Location
    Edwardsville--Illinois
    Tractor
    NH TC 33D / ford NNA

    Default Re: Slag for Driveway

    Keith: In my opinion slag is much better than lime stone, especially grade 8. The slag on my driveway lasted for years and years, their is no smell but it is heavier than rock so you won't get quite as much per ton.

  4. #4
    Super Star Member EddieWalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    17,603
    Location
    Tyler, Texas
    Tractor
    Several, all used and abused.

    Default Re: Slag for Driveway

    I'm not sure if there are differnt types of slag or not. It's available here from Tyler Pipe as a resdue from casting the pipe. My neighbor has the contract for it. It is a glass type material that doesn't compact or lock together. It is strictly for top coating a solid base as an alternative, or inexpensive opption to nice stone or a solid seal surface.

    I personally dislike it. When you walk on it, it sticks to your shoes and you bring it with you wherever you go. It doesn't lock, so it's constantly shifting and moving.

    Limestone is the standard road base used here for all road building. 4 inches is usually plenty. I couldn't imagine why you would want to pay for more. Especially on a residential application.

    I was told about recycled concrete recently and how well it works for base material. It was explained to me that it locks together better than limestone, and that some limestone can break down faster than other grades.

    The key to base rock is the ability to lock together with the fines filling in the gaps during compaction.

    Depending you your conditions, you might want to use a synthetic material to help keep your rock from sinking into the ground.


  5. #5
    Epic Contributor MossRoad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    29,806
    Location
    South Bend, Indiana (near)
    Tractor
    Power Trac PT425 2001 Model Year

    Default Re: Slag for Driveway

    I have used that company for slag from the steel mills. They have an office in South Bend, IN. When I bought it the price was about $300.00 for a 20 yard load. I had 5 loads delivered. It makes an excellent road base. The pieces vary anywhere from 1.5 inches to 1/4 inch, are very jagged and lock together really well. There is absolutely no smell or runoff. It is a nice gray color. Kind of reminds me of volcanic rock as it has lots of little air pockets in it, but is heavy compared to volcanic rock. I like it better than crushed limestone, as limestone will push around after a while. This stuff stays put.

  6. #6
    Super Member SPIKER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    5,000
    Location
    Ohio, Jeromesville, Ashland County
    Tractor
    Jinma 284

    Default Re: Slag for Driveway

    we can get it here as byproducts form coal burning elec power plants. it is not used for compaction and does not compact well, it does LOCK together well which is why it won't compact. sticks to keep from filling the voids.


    good for roads and parking lots though!

    MarkM [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

  7. #7
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    721
    Location
    Boerne, Texas
    Tractor
    Kubota M9000

    Default Re: Slag for Driveway

    Eddie I have a friend from Louisianna who told me that most of their rural privately owned roads from where he was raised were made from recycled concrete. He said they'd call the concrete company's around them and they would deliver their truck cleanout piles to their house at about .40 cents a ton. That sounded like a great idea but when I called the company's around me they said the EPA had decided that it was toxic waste or something and they couldn't sell it in Texas. Was I mislead or maybe have you checked on some recently around Tyler I don't know how long this has been the case but my buddy told me it worked great after it rained on it a bit and you drove on it for a while it would turn into what appeared to be a solid surface concrete drive.
    Steve

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    46
    Location
    Chelsea, MI USA
    Tractor
    Kioti CK30

    Default Re: Slag for Driveway

    Turns out there is not much difference in price between slag, crushed concrete and limestone. There is a noticable difference in price between delivery methods ~$15/ton delivered with a 25 ton 3 axle but only ~$12 per ton for a double trailer road train that carries 50 tons a trip.

    MossRoad: Did Levy spread the load fairly well along the drive with a gate dump or was that price one big pile? Not sure if they could be very accurate spreading with the road train setup.

  9. #9
    Super Member RobS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Posts
    6,707
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Tractor
    John Deere 790

    Default Re: Slag for Driveway

    That's pretty good pricing Keith. Our drive is crushed concrete. Large (fist sized) chunks as a base then smaller stuff and fines to top it. We drove on the big chunks for a while during house construction to work it in some. I need to top coat again, it's been two years. I'd like to use limestone as I think it looks better.

    Can't run the road trains in Indiana (where Mossroad is). That's a Michigan thing although they didn't use them for our drive. I asked at one point and they were pretty reluctant to use them on a residential project stating they need a lot of room to turn around.

    I've used a lot of crushed concrete around my place since moving in. Added a rear drive and RV parking pad, bases for retaining walls and the sub base for our patio. It's great stuff to work with. Packs really well. You will find various bits of rebar here and there [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

  10. #10
    Epic Contributor MossRoad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    29,806
    Location
    South Bend, Indiana (near)
    Tractor
    Power Trac PT425 2001 Model Year

    Default Re: Slag for Driveway

    <font color="blue"> Did Levy spread the load fairly well along the drive with a gate dump or was that price one big pile? </font>

    I had to use the Tri-axle dump trucks because that's all they offered here. That was OK, because a long trailer would have had no place to turn around on our place and I wouldn't have wanted them blocking the highway to attempt to back into the drive. I also didn't want them to spread it for me... are you nuts? That would have taken away my tractor seat time! But they would have spread it if I wanted them to.

    I have also heard that the crushed concrete works well, too.

    Some folks here are taking about slag from other sources. The slag we are talking about here is from steel mills, not anything else. It is unique stuff.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2016 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.