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  1. #41
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    48,364
    Location
    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: A road over swamp?

    i kinda doubt the OP has the funds for geo textile fabrics too...

  2. #42
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    52
    Location
    Yaouk, Snowy Mountains, Australia
    Tractor
    Dong Feng 254 (25 hp)

    Default Re: A road over swamp?

    Quote Originally Posted by Soundguy View Post
    i kinda doubt the OP has the funds for geo textile fabrics too...
    Geotextiles have come down a lot in price recently. I used 50 metres of geotextile on another road i have that had a firmer base. If the base is very soft the tetxile may be deformed to the point of damage after a short while.

    Of course Mr Soundguy knows this
    Yaouk

  3. #43
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    983
    Location
    Hartford, SD
    Tractor
    Kubota L3400F

    Default Re: A road over swamp?

    Quote Originally Posted by yaouk View Post
    Geotextiles have come down a lot in price recently. I used 50 metres of geotextile on another road i have that had a firmer base. If the base is very soft the tetxile may be deformed to the point of damage after a short while.

    Of course Mr Soundguy knows this
    Realize their is a huge difference in nonwoven geotextile fabrics that look like heavy felt and the structural fabric that looks like a snow fence (Tensar). They also perform completely different tasks. A nonwoven fabric adds zero stability to a road but will keep the granular material separated from the subgrade (mud).

  4. #44
    Super Member crazyal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,894
    Location
    Northern Vermont

    Default Re: A road over swamp?

    Quote Originally Posted by Yaouk1961 View Post
    You can know after all. Its been a long time between drinks but I finally ckecked back with this Forum.
    The crossing was one of the few things I have done that has actually worked well after 13 years. It took 2 ton cars easily and the occassional concrete truck. Over time some tyres did pop up - but I simply removed them and filled in the hole. Also as the base was not level or consistent some tyres would be pushed down and require more fill over the top. On average i would place a layer of gravel (about 75mm or 3 inches) over the top each year and that is the extent of the maintence - apart from mowing as the grass grew through the gravel.

    In retrospect I would do some things differently. I used rather small gravel at about 20-25mm. This is fine for a top coating and for lighter vehicles but for a solid base you need much larger stuff - at leat 100mm or 4 inches. I am in the process of upgrading the road to morer safely take trucks 15-20ton. For this I am simply using a larger size gravel. It will never be strong enough for regular use of big trucks.

    Take home messages:
    Its a lot of work to bolt those tyres together!
    Use gravel at least 75mm in size for a base.
    The road will always be 4x4 only as wheel spin does cause holes.

    Oh and for the record: Only one person was ever stuck. My neighbour drove his 2-wheel drive truck over the edge one day to avoid a floating log during a flood.

    Hope people find this entertaining after all these years.
    George
    Nice to hear an update. I have an area that's muddy, not really a swamp. I've been reading up on ideas so I can make a trail so I can get a tractor across it to skid logs. Over the last few years I've been putting rocks the size of a microwave into the ruts to fill them in. It's not too long, maybe 100 feet. The rocks have held up nicely to ATV traffic but they are too slippery for the tractor. I thought about putting down rough cut Hemlock and burying that but while I have lots of Hemlock I don't have a cheap quick way to turn logs into boards. After rereading this I'm thinking that maybe a grid of tires over the rocks filled with hard pan might work well. I'm sure I could get as many free used tires as I want and bolting them together shouldn't be too bad. Plus the tires would raise the trail up about 6" above everything else and help keep it dry.
    Kubota L4240,Case 580K backhoe, Case 450 Dozer

  5. #45
    Super Member tcreeley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    6,356
    Location
    New England Yankee living in Central Maine
    Tractor
    NH TC30

    Default Re: A road over swamp?

    Local DOT used shredded tires as a base for a swampy area. It worked, but it started to pollute the area. Generally people make corduroy roads in low lying swampy areas, logs side by side and across the roadway, and on top of that add gravel. Overtime, they just add more to the surface as it slowly sinks in.

    -corduroyroad-gif


    (nice site)
    Thoughts from the Woods: Corduroy Road Update
    -img_2099-jpg-img_2101-jpg-img_2102-jpg
    2003 NH TC30, 5' International Agritech Bushog, Hiller/Bedder, + miscellaneous and sundry items of use.

  6. #46
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    3,369
    Location
    North of Mtl,Que,Can (Ste Adele)
    Tractor
    MT180D

    Default Re: A road over swamp?

    Quote Originally Posted by Soundguy View Post
    i kinda doubt the OP has the funds for geo textile fabrics too...
    Old carpeting could be an economical alternative. I have seen it used occasionally. Most current carpets are synthetic and should last as long as geo textile.
    I would guess any contractor that does hotels would be more than happy to donate his pulls.

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