Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Veteran Member alchemysa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,260
    Location
    South Australia
    Tractor
    Kubota B1550HSD

    Default Home made bench saw.

    Isn't it good when you finally make use of some of the old junk you've had lying around for years.

    When we tore our old shack down 12 months ago I wound up with a 6 foot high pile of old building timber that I didn't know how to deal with. Its old, dry and full of nails. I wanted to cut it into firewood but I figured the chain saw wouldnt last 5 minutes, and a hand held rip snorter (circular saw) was just too backbreaking and awkward. Everything I looked at buying to do the job was just too expensive or overkill. Finally I found a second hand bench saw on ebay. It was small and had no motor (and pricey at $90) but it had promise. (I liked the idea of building some kind of belt driven saw as I figured it would be able to take more punishment).

    The table is an old weights bench that the local footy club was throwing out. (I welded some wider tube accross the base of the legs). The motor was off an old cracked water pump that been sitting in the shed for 20 years. The safety guards were the sides of an old fireplace screen that had also been in the shed for 15 years. The aluminium channel supporting the side guard was also from the shed. The motor provided 2800rpm (at no load) so I bought a 2" and 3" pulley from the local machinery shop. That gave me about 5000rpm at the blade. A surplus store was selling V-belts at 10 for $1 so I've got a lifetime supply of belts. I've never built anything with a belt before so I was a bit concerned about how to keep the belt tensioned, but this turned out to be no problem at all as it works best with the belt pretty loose.

    I'm happy to say on my test timber it works like a dream. Slices through most timber like butter. The blade is only 7 1/4" so I'm limited to a 45mm thick cut but I think I can fit an 8 1/4" blade if they are available.

    The safety guard on top turned out to be anything but safe. I sliced my finger twice on sharp mesh before adding the tape along the edges. I also discovered very quickly why these types of benches often don't have guards. If you try to cut a piece of timber thats too thick the wood ends up between the guard and the blade and gets very dicey to remove. I may remove the top guard when I tackle the big pile next week. I'll definately be wearing leather gloves regardless.

    In the meantime I might try and add some wheels. Its heavier than it looks. It probably weighs about 90lbs.

    Before building this I almost posed the question on TBN of how the heck you guys deal with piles of old building timber.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -bench-saw-002-jpg   -bench-saw-004-jpg  
    Last edited by alchemysa; 06-28-2008 at 08:17 AM.

  2. #2
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    17,600
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada

    Default Re: Home made bench saw.

    Are there gona be some supports for longer pieces?
    Egon
    50 years behind the times
    Livin in a
    Worn out skin bag filled with rattlin bones

  3. #3
    Veteran Member alchemysa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,260
    Location
    South Australia
    Tractor
    Kubota B1550HSD

    Default Re: Home made bench saw.

    Quote Originally Posted by Egon
    Are there gona be some supports for longer pieces?
    I've got a tall saw horse thats almost the perfect height to stand next to it. But I am concerned about the issue you raise. Much of the timber is about 8 ft long. And I'll be using this outside, on dirt. An adjustable height outrigger fitted to the left hand side may be the best way to support long pieces at the ideal height.

    I learned quickly to never cut a long thick piece of timber in the middle without proper support. (it was thicker than the blade height). It sliced through OK but then it stopped the saw dead. I should have known better. I was playing around and just wasn't thinking. So now I'll be working from the left and cutting off about 20" at time. And most of it is thinner than the blade height.

  4. #4
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,906
    Location
    Brazos County Texas 77808
    Tractor
    Kubota L3130HST w/LA723 loader

    Default Re: Home made bench saw.

    Here in the new world 8 inch is a standard diameter blade for a small bench saw. You should not have too much trouble finding one. Usual arbor diameter is 5/8". Sorry I don't have my calculator handy to convert to mm.

    Vernon
    Kubota L3130HST, BL4690B backhoe, LA723 Loader w/QA, 6' BB, 6' Bush Hog, 5' RB, PHD, ATI grapple, Hy-Reach Tree Shear, toothbar, pallet forks, grubbin bucket.

  5. #5
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    7,982
    Location
    Shingle Springs California
    Tractor
    New Holland TC40D

    Default Re: Home made bench saw.

    That's cool! Now, you could run something like that from a belt pulley on something like my Farmall-A.
    RobertN in Shingle Springs Calif

  6. #6
    Veteran Member alchemysa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,260
    Location
    South Australia
    Tractor
    Kubota B1550HSD

    Default Re: Home made bench saw.

    Quote Originally Posted by texbaylea
    Here in the new world 8 inch is a standard diameter blade for a small bench saw.

    Vernon
    Yep, got one yesterday at the local blacksmith. (8 1/4" actually). I also picked up a roller support stand for about $18. I also see they had cheap saw benches and drop saws for $80 to $130. I kind of wondered if I'da been better off just buying one of those. But my bench is going to be doing some hard work and running for about 8 hours solid. I don't think those saws with the blade bolted directly to the motor would take anything like that. My bench also gives me two hands free, unlike a drop saw. So far I've run the bench non-stop for 30 minutes with no problems. The big test is at the shack next week.

    I've also changed the safety guard. This works great. Swings up and down as the wood passes through or can be swung completely over and out of the way. The front gap of the guard is a just a little less than the maximum cutting height of the blade so it serves as a warning that any wood that doesn't fit underneath should be handled real carefully.

    The story of the guard is funny I think. We were in the carpark at the local supermarket. I said to my wife, Deb, that I wanted to stop at the hardware store to see if they had a piece plastic channel that might be suitable to make a guard. (I'd already looked everywhere at home with no success).
    'What sort of plastic?" she said.
    'Well you see that busted piece of metal on the ground over by the fence? Something like that."
    Deb stepped out of the car and had a closer look. 'Hey, this IS plastic she said".

    So we solved a problem and picked up some litter at the same time. I don't think I could have bought or found anything more perfect.
    A six-pack of Aussie beer to the first correct answer on what it was. (Winner must pick up prize from me).

    (edit. The upright that the guard is attached to is actually lower than the saw platform. I just noticed that the pics make it look higher.)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -saw-1-jpg   -saw-2-jpg   -saw-3-jpg   -saw-4-jpg  
    Last edited by alchemysa; 06-30-2008 at 01:11 AM.

  7. #7
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    7,982
    Location
    Shingle Springs California
    Tractor
    New Holland TC40D

    Default Re: Home made bench saw.

    Quote Originally Posted by alchemysa
    A six-pack of Aussie beer to the first correct answer on what it was. (Winner must pick up prize from me).

    (edit. The upright that the guard is attached to is actually lower than the saw platform. I just noticed that the pics make it look higher.)
    Looks like the arm you might mount a computer monitor off of, or part of a grocery cart.

    How about some Castlemaine XXXX
    RobertN in Shingle Springs Calif

  8. #8
    Veteran Member alchemysa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,260
    Location
    South Australia
    Tractor
    Kubota B1550HSD

    Default Re: Home made bench saw.

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertN
    Looks like the arm you might mount a computer monitor off of, or part of a grocery cart.

    How about some Castlemaine XXXX
    Sorry, thats a fail. (And I'm doing you a favor. XXXX is the worst beer in Australia!).

  9. #9
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    17,600
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada

    Default Re: Home made bench saw.

    What is was was a discarded piece of plastic that was originally mistaken for a piece of metal. Now; reward yourself with a six pack of Pilsner from Pilsen brewed to the 1567 specifications!
    Egon
    50 years behind the times
    Livin in a
    Worn out skin bag filled with rattlin bones

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    7,982
    Location
    Shingle Springs California
    Tractor
    New Holland TC40D

    Default Re: Home made bench saw.

    Quote Originally Posted by alchemysa
    (And I'm doing you a favor. XXXX is the worst beer in Australia!).
    Oh A buddy was there 20 years ago, brought down for some stock car racing. He liked it... He brought back a Castlemain poster. The poster is cool. I have very diferent beer tastes then him though...
    RobertN in Shingle Springs Calif

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2014 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.