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  1. #1
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    Default Torque Wrench

    In anticipation of eventually having to remove/reinstall the mower blades, I'm in the market for a torque wrench. The spec for the blade bolts are 110 - 130 ft lbs.

    What brand and kind do you all recommend? I've seen beam type, digital readouts, etc. Craftsman has <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.sears.com/sr/product/summary/productsummary.jsp?BV_SessionID=@@@@1139661117.102 6957944@@@@&amp;BV_EngineID=cchgadcfjldddkhcehgcem gdffmdfin.0&amp;vertical=SEARS&amp;pid=00944597000 &amp;sid=I0008300030000100085>one</A> for $100. Any good?

  2. #2
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
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    Default Re: Torque Wrench

    I like the micrometer setting (better known as the "click" type). I guess you can get these with digital readouts now. These should be returned to zero after torquing, by the way. And they should be calibrated every few years (unless you drop it or something). Now, as a Quality guy, I should know all about that, but I've had my torque wrench (a Craftsman) calibrated once since the mid 80's.
    Deflecting beam wrenches will take more abuse, but it's a pain to try to watch the indicator when you're torquing at higher foot-lbs (or Newton Meters, for all you metric fans (before you ask, 1 ft lb equals 1.36 N-M)

  3. #3

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    Default Re: Torque Wrench

    Hi Mike,
    The Craftsman torgue wrench you posted a link to would be a fine choice. A wrench from any of the major tool manufactors (Snap on, mac, matco, proto, ect) should also be fine.

    You can find these wrenches on ebay often for a lot less then retail, but then you have to worry about when it was calibrated last.

    I built many an engine with an old Craftsman beam type. But I prefer the "click" type because I don't have to be watching a dial or LCD readout to know when I've reached the desired torque. (With the click type, you set the torque and then you hear and feel a click when the torque is reached) It's surprising how many times you'll be tightening a bolt under or over a piece of machinery and you can't get your head in position to read the dial. Especially as these old eyes get harder to focus.

    HTH
    Dave Perry aka karma-kanic

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Torque Wrench

    I own nearly a dozen different torque wrenches (I actually am a mechanic like it or not, believe it or not) and each one has a different set of purposes. For your need the Craftsman would do nicley. I think the Snapon are the best especially in the click type. The beam type are rarely used but I have a couple in different sizes because, while difficult to read, you can maintain a constant pressure when pulling a stretch on rod bolts etc. A well equipped home shop should have a good 20 to 200ish inch pound wrench, something also in the 15 to 75 foot lb or 200 to 600 inch lb and then a big sucker for 75 to 200 ft lbs etc. A single torque wrench cannot cover all size fasteners.
    I torque almost all fasteners, especially on aircraft, there are books which give standard values for diiferent diameters and thread pitches when a specific torque is not provided. J

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Torque Wrench

    Thanks, Roy, Dave and TC! - I went and re-read the Craftsman description and it doesn't indicate that it's a click type. I'll keep looking for one of them.

  6. #6
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
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    Default Re: Torque Wrench

    " went and re-read the Craftsman description and it doesn't indicate that it's a click type."


    Hey Mike, I suggest you run over to Sears and look at that torque wrench. Although the description doesn't state it, I reckon it is a "click" type wrench. Not 100% sure, but a pretty good guess...

    Even if it isn't, you should find what you want in the Tool department.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Torque Wrench

    Mike you can tell if it's the click type by the numbers being on the handle. The way you set the desired torque setting is you turn the end of the handle until you desired numbers align with an indictator.

    If you've had tires installed on a passenger vehicle lately you've seen the clicker in action.

    It is important to always return the handle to neutral after use.

    I've got a craftsman that I've had since the eighties also. I haven't used it this century tho........[img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img]

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Torque Wrench

    <font color=blue>I've got a craftsman that I've had since the eighties also. I haven't used it this century tho......</font color=blue>

    Ouch. That hurts. I've been dating everything lately as 2001. I'm doing my best to hold back the years.

    Chuck

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Torque Wrench

    Craftsman has both the beam type and click type. The one you are asking about is a click type. Sears did have a click type that has a numerical readout rather than a micrometer type for setting the torque. It was pretty neat--that may be what they still sell. It is a click type. There is another type that has a large dial with a following needle for showing max torque reached--it does not click and I have never seen one in a Sears catalog, all the pro tool companies like Snapon and Proto have them. Really, if this is a rarely used tool for you the Sears will be fine, if you want a fine tool that will be around for generations get a Snapon. J

  10. #10
    Super Star Member RoyJackson's Avatar
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    Default Re: Torque Wrench

    "There is another type that has a large dial with a following needle for showing max torque reached..."

    That type is called a <font color=red>Dial Indicator</font color=red> torque wrench. I've used them..but never cared for 'em. They can be fussy in a real world environment. Also, as the <font color=blue>Deflecting Beam</font color=blue> torque wrenches, you've got to try to read the torque.
    The micrometer setting type is just so much easier to use.

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