Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    1,591
    Location
    Western Connecticut
    Tractor
    2003 Kubota L3430

    Default Dark Energy and the Tractorman

    When the tractorman is driving his tractor over a swamp at night, taking his two dogs out for their midnight frolic, he often gazes in awe at the glittering sky. And wonders. What are the stars and galaxies made of? What else is out there?

    Does it bother anyone else that the answer now seems to be that most of the matter out there is "dark matter" and, just discovered in the last two years, that most of the energy out there is "dark energy". Dark matter is old hat now. But dark energy has really thrown astronomy, physics and cosmology--favorite hobbies, all, of the tractorman--into a tizzy.

    When Einstein was finished with his general relativity equations in 1916, he realized that his equations could not account for a static universe--ie, a universe that is neither expanding nor contracting. And Al intuitively felt that the universe must be static and stable. So, he plugged a "fudge factor" into his equations to make them work. Translated into real world physics, this fudge factor meant there was in the universe an "anti-gravity" force. This repulsive force, according to Einstein's fudge factor, tends to push the stars and galaxies apart with just enough force to balance out gravity's tendency to contact the stars back toward each other into an ultimate collapse of universe.

    In 1929 Hubble discovered that the universe was not static; it was expanding. Thinking that his fudge factor was unnecessary and wrong, Einstein proclaimed that it was his "greatest mistake".

    By 2001 experiments showed that the expansion of the universe was not at a constant velocity, as had been assumed since 1929. No, the universe is expanding at an accelerating velocity. What causes that? It can only be an anti-gravity repulsive force so strong that it completely dominates and overwhelms the total gravitational force of all the matter (including the dark matter) in the universe. So the fudge factor is back, only a lot bigger and stronger than even Einstein contemplated.

    What is this force? No one has a clue. They call it "dark energy" because it exceeds the calculated sum of all the known and possible energy in the universe by a factor of 3 or so. It is assumed that dark energy pervades the entire universe evenly and uniformly instead of clumping like all known forms of matter and energy. According to e=mc squared and the standard model of particle physics, all energy has a particle state. So what particles of matter make up the dark energy field? It is almost as if we were back to Newton's "ether". Pity the poor cosmologists and physicists, who seem to slide back two steps every time they think they have taken one forward.

    But they don't have the tractorman's problems. No, indeedy. As the tractorman gazes at the heavens and ponders the mystery and meaning of dark energy ... as his German Shepard, Max the stickaholic, chases the coyote who is chasing his Lhasa Apso, Sasha the pushy princess ... the dark matter of the Oozama VerBoten swamp reaches out like gooey fudge, and sucks his tractor with an unseen energy that completely overpowers the kubota engine and the useless R4 tires.

    For the 14th time.

    However, it will long be noted that the tractorman has extricated himself the past 5 times in a row with his handy-dandy Hi-Lift Jack, plus Jackmate and Off Road Kit, as recommended by the formerly unfettered mental force of Tractorbynetian knowledge and wisdom.

    It will also long be noted, at least in one 11 acre corner of the dark universe, that the 14 tractor burials were not without resurrecting grace. The Oozama has been shorn of all its phragmites and cattails, and is now composed entirely of grass. Grass growing in wet muddy ground, but grass nevertheless. And that's easier to maintain, especially when the tractorman gets a rear finish mower to replace the fudge sucking midmount mower.

    Einstein would be proud, I'm sure, of the tractorman's one step forward.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    3,371
    Location
    California - S.F. East Bay & Sierra foothills
    Tractor
    Kubota L2500DT Standard Transmission

    Default Re: Dark Energy and the Tractorman

    Wow! Just when I think you've found another planet to inhabit, you pop back up here.

    Glad you're still with us, Glenn!

    If I interpret the not-so-short novel you just posted here correctly, you got stuck again. The good news for me is that you successfully used the Hi-Lift Jack and Jackmate to pop your mighty 'Bota outa the muck. I have the same hardware, but have yet to use it. Now I feel better knowing that it may indeed come in handy.

    Guess I should run the pictures here pretty soon, but this last weekend I took my own orange beast right into the deepest part of my pond. How did I get it out? Heck, I just drove out the same way I drove in. We have a near drought situation out here and my pond is mostly baked so dry that my R1's didn't even leave footprints.

    Glad you pulled your message together in those last couple of paragraphs 'cuz I was starting to think it wasn't a "related" topic at all. Shoulda known better.

    Glad to hear you're still riding your submersible machine and forging ever onward (if not downward) into your mysterious land of ooze.

    (BTW -- I noticed while reading between the lines that you have lines to read between. Did you solve the OS-10/TBN line break problem, or are you simply using another computer?)

  3. #3
    Super Member ronjhall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    7,318
    Location
    SE Michigan, TX when its cold in MI.
    Tractor
    Kubota 2910 HST

    Default Re: Dark Energy and the Tractorman

    Glenn
    Good to hear from you. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]
    [img]/w3tcompact/icons/hmm.gif[/img] 14 times and still counting. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/shocked.gif[/img][img]/w3tcompact/icons/eyes.gif[/img]
    Hope rear mount mower solves the problem. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/eyes.gif[/img]

  4. #4
    Platinum Member PhilNH5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    786
    Location
    SE NH
    Tractor
    Kubota B3000HSDCC

    Default Re: Dark Energy and the Tractorman

    Glenn,
    That was without a doubt one of the most interesting threads I have read on TBN. I had to click on your profile an see who the heck was behind this. Dang, He's a lawyer!! And he dabbles in quantum mechanics for fun??

    I too liked the way you tied it all together and brought it back to tractors. I think if you acknowledge Neils Bohr's original concept to predicting an electron's postion that later evolved into quantam mechanics on an atomic level and the randomness of electron placement you will find that being in the quagmire 14 times doesn't seem so bad.

    Two more points:
    1) In the continuing (I hope) saga I think Tractorman definitely deserves to be capitalized.
    2) Was a coyote really chasing after your Lhasa Apso? Seems the possible frightening outcomes of that would interrupt even Tractorman's contemplation of the universe and kubota's role in it.

    Phil

  5. #5
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    1,720
    Location
    Columbia county NY
    Tractor
    87 Ingersoll 444, 84 Ingersoll224/'44 GreavlyL/60'sGreavlyL/49 Ford 8N

    Default Re: Dark Energy and the Tractorman

    <font color=red>Seems the possible frightening outcomes of that would interrupt even Tractorman's contemplation of the universe and kubota's role in it.</font color=red>

    But thats all part of the universe. That coyote could be whats makeing the universe run. And if it never happand, we could have come to an end.........

  6. #6
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    1,134
    Location
    South Carolina
    Tractor
    Kubota B7500

    Default Re: Dark Energy and the Tractorman

    Okay, now I feel like I'm reading the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    Jeff

  7. #7
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    1,720
    Location
    Columbia county NY
    Tractor
    87 Ingersoll 444, 84 Ingersoll224/'44 GreavlyL/60'sGreavlyL/49 Ford 8N

    Default Re: Dark Energy and the Tractorman

    <font color=red>Okay, now I feel like I'm reading the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy</font color=red>

    Can you tell I'm a fan?[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  8. #8
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    1,134
    Location
    South Carolina
    Tractor
    Kubota B7500

    Default Re: Dark Energy and the Tractorman

    Yep, sure can. Now I just need to find my babblefish to figure out what the heck Glennmac is talking about.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    Jeff

  9. #9
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    1,720
    Location
    Columbia county NY
    Tractor
    87 Ingersoll 444, 84 Ingersoll224/'44 GreavlyL/60'sGreavlyL/49 Ford 8N

    Default Re: Dark Energy and the Tractorman

    Jeff
    Oh and BTW. A bit off topic, Did you know he died? They put out anouther book from notes he had. I have not read it yet though.

  10. #10
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    1,591
    Location
    Western Connecticut
    Tractor
    2003 Kubota L3430

    Default Re: Dark Energy and the Tractorman

    The explanation of dark energy was accurate to the best of my recollection and understanding from watching a tv show on the subject and some internet research. There is a brand new book out that explains the discoveries leading to the accelerating universe and dark energy conjectures: The Extravagant Universe by Kirshner (or Kirschner). I have it on order.

    Although I find this subject fascinating, and continuously rue my decision to drop out as a physics major 40 years ago, I don't mean to bore anyone nor violate the reasonable rules of TBN. But there is an evolutionary process that afflicts experienced tractorman here, and will now afflict them at an accelerating rate. At first the newbie tractorman asks for a lot of help and questions about tractors, and gets it. Then so about accessories and projects. After a year or so, the tractorman starts giving advice himself to other newbies. Eventually the tractorman's situation stabilizes; he doesn't need any more equipment and has figured out how to do most things he needs to do. At about the same time, the tractorman runs out of dark enery and just tires of answering the same and repetitive newbie questions, and silently passes most of that baton to others who came along about a year after him. At this stage, the tractorman doesn't know all there is to know about tractors, but he may know all he needs to know for his particular tractoring situation. At this stage, what role does TBN play in his life? It used to be that the tractorman stayed here and chewed the fat with his buddies. Now? To me, that is now a mystery. I hope the answer is not: begone. But, sadly, many veteran tractormen seem to be doing just so.

    Yes, Harv, you among others recommended the Hi-Lift, and you specifically recommeded the Jackmate accessory. My kind of burial is not like driving off a cliff of solidity into a swamp. I am slowly driving over very soft and muddy ground trying to chop down the cattails, etc. after a relatively dry period. I know I am risking getting stuck. What happens is: the front tires (which always are less flotational) spin through the vegetation and sink into the mud below. This lowers the front end of the tractor enough that the mmm will sink in, like an upside down cup. At this point, the fraudulent and despicable R4 tires will spin uselessly and dig themselves down into a trench in the muck. Had to be towed out 7 times in 3 years.

    Seems I can do it now with the jack. Have to put the jack on a supporting base of wood so it won't sink itself. Then I jack up each end real high and put boards under the tires and over the trenches dug in the mud. Then lower the tires onto the boards. I only usually need to drive 12" or so to get out of the trench holes and on to semi-solid ground.

    It becomes a matter of being able to judge the "surface tension" of the dirt-mud-grass cover. And I always end up pushing the envelope too far. If I had a rmm, I could back into the areas from different sides without putting my tires at risk in the real soup. I used to do this with my brushhog, but I'm too lazy to take off my mmm and now want the nicer cut a finish mower gives. Probably going to get a cheap rmm in the spring, maybe a First Choice that I saw last week, and keep the mmm, too.

    I do now have a second Mac computer, both running OS 10.2.1. No, Harv, this site still does not accept my carriage returns from either Mac. (Every other site on the internet does, including CBN.) I have to post the message, then immediately take it back to edit it with paragraphs. They carriage returns will not "stick" in pre-post editing, but they will stick in post-post editing. Maybe you can figure it out. Us Mac guys gotta stick, if not get stuck, together.

    See ya'll--maybe in a parallel universe ... which is also an upcoming theory based on quantum tunneling effects.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2014 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.