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  1. #1
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    Kubota, JD and a Grillo

    Default In bed transfer tanks.

    In referance to the tank subject that arose on the Duramax thread:

    I special orderd an Aux. tank with an extra reinforced bung for a transfer pump. You can add filters on to the transfer pumps, I'm going to buy mine at Nothern Tool. I wanted to extend my range and refuel the tractors too. ATTA charges $54 for the pump bung on their Aux. tanks. I chose the AT50CB. The tank is: 19H-11W-60L and the matching tool box is: 19H-20W-60L. Price: $1364.00, including full installation kit.

    ATTA had what I was looking for and their prices seem to be much lower than the other "higher end" ones like the ATTB boxes at $1565 to $1800 +. I like this ATTA model because it still maintains a usable tool box. Most only leave you 8 inches of depth. This chest is 19 X 20 X 60"s.

    Here is their we site:ATTA

    The one I chose is on the Tanks & Boxes page, model AT50CB. I should have mine in less than two weeks since I orderd it with the transfer pump bung. Other wise it would have shipped the next day.... ATTB had a three month waiting period due to a fire or something and ATTB was too expensive, about $1750 plus freight for what I needed.

    Transferflow does not offer these style of tanks, their tool combo is very limited on storage and very pricy. I also liked the non computer idea, a simple switch and totally seperate tank makes better sense to me.

  2. #2
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
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    Default Re: In bed transfer tanks.

    Sagebrush:

    Back where I grew up in farming country we called them " slip Tanks " Almost every p/u had one.

    Egon

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    Michigan
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    JD 2210

    Default Re: In bed transfer tanks.

    Sagebrush, I think we are trying to both do the same thing. Do you have a part # for the filter you will fit on the refuelling pump ? The filter does not seem the issue in my research but a filter head with the proper line Dia. Most 2 micrin filter heads have a 3/8" line size that I have found ( Racor) . I agree those at www.transferflow.com are more expensive but if you just look at the refuelling tanks they are less $$ and dont fill to the oem tank or have the electronics. I dont think they offer a tool box combo that way. My idea at this point is to have roughly a 90 gallon tank with a refuelling pump ( electric 15 gpm ) and weld a extra bung to accomadate a recirculateing lift pump through a 2 micron filter. The lift pump will continually filter the fill in the aux tank as I drive. I will put all my fuel in the aux tank and then fill the OEM tank and the tractor from that. The research continues though. Dave

  4. #4
    Super Member
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    Default Re: In bed transfer tanks.

    Dave,

    Instead of worrying so much about filtering fuel before you put it in why not just get a Dahl setup and mount it pre-pump? Then you have the peace of mind for filtration and can use any fuel you want anywhere.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: In bed transfer tanks.

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( Dave,

    Instead of worrying so much about filtering fuel before you put it in why not just get a Dahl setup and mount it pre-pump? Then you have the peace of mind for filtration and can use any fuel you want anywhere.
    )</font>

    I'll second that. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] Thats the best way.

    I plan on using a regular 10 micron goldenrod filter/water seperator on my transfer pump, cost $19.95. I don't think my Kubota has a water seperator. Hence the one on the transfer pump.

    Never had any filter issues on the dodge cummins as long as I fill up at the Pilot. I'm just going to use the stock set up, no extra filters for the trucks fuel.

  6. #6

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    Default Re: In bed transfer tanks.

    ok guys you got me on a Dahl set up. what in the world is that ? I am totally new to this aux tank stuff. The standard golden rod Fuel filters or water filters are no where near adequite for the new high pressure common rail system. I am assumeing Sagebrush that you do not have one of the HO cummings as they suffer from the same injector delima as the GM. The traditional lift pump is not a part of the fuel system. There is only one 7 micron spin on filter that is engine mounted. They are approx 60% efficient. The 30,000 + PSI of the common rail injection system on the Duramax and the new HO cummings is enough to blast craters in the injector tips with any particles or water. The ford still operates on the lift pump. The idea here is to not have the injectors fail just over the 100,000 mile mark, or just out of warranty. It is several thousand dollars to replace them. Retail $540 ea x 8 plus other parts and labor [img]/forums/images/graemlins/mad.gif[/img] It is only about $400 to have a pre OEM 2 micron filter set up installed. Thats about $150 for labor. The goldenRod filters I have seen are 15 microns. Dave

  7. #7
    Super Member
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    Default Re: In bed transfer tanks.

    I was wondering about your fanaticism over the two micron thing. Now it makes some sense doc.

    To put this in perspective think about the principles behind the waterjet technology. You take water, extreme high pressure, and add a little grit. You now have a tool that cuts steel, stone, foam, anything.

    If, as Dave suggests, the new diesel injection systems operate at the thirty thousand psi range then any particles that could be grit are in affect, a waterjet, the cutting tool.

    It is interesting, how things work, and not like they used to all the time.

  8. #8
    Super Member
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    Default Re: In bed transfer tanks.


  9. #9
    Gold Member
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    Default Re: In bed transfer tanks.

    Never heard about a cummins having injector problems due to filters. Yes I have an 03 HO. I know some say its an issue with the GM diesels. Time will tell on the newer Cummins, but in the commercial world, we have had zero injector problems.
    I'm still out on adding extra fuel filters. TDR has a few trucks over 100K with no engine problems at all. On the cummins the pressure is 23,000.

    Its a good idea though, I may add a 2 micron filter in the future. Remember that extra filters will wear your "lift pump/fuel pump" out quicker unless you buy a "booster pump". I just found out there is a Racor high flow 2 micron filter, I'll try to get a part number. 5 micron or less filters can only be an improvement over the stock 7 micron.

    How much does the Dahl filters run?






  10. #10
    Gold Member
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    Default Re: In bed transfer tanks.

    Never mind on the price, its $356.00. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif[/img]

    I'll probably go with a 2 micron racor unit, about $120.00.

    Look Here

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