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  1. #1
    Gold Member
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    Tennessee
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    Kubota L2800DT

    Default Jobs and people over 40 years old.

    Hi, Have any of you had problems finding work after 40 years old? I live in a college town and this is not the place for people over 40 because employers would rather hire young people over older. I think mainly because medical and employers get tax cuts by hiring college students. What do you think about this?

    Terry

  2. #2
    Veteran Member DUMBDOG's Avatar
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    Central ND, Central FL
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    NH 1630 W-7308 FEL/ Kubota L4630GSTC W-LA853 FEL WQ/A-CC 2544

    Default Re: Jobs and people over 40 years old.

    I am not aware of any tax cuts available to employers that hire college students.

  3. #3
    Elite Member
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    Kansas
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    Kubota BX2200, Kubota B2410

    Default Re: Jobs and people over 40 years old.

    Yes, I have had problems with promotons and assignments with my current employer and yes I have run into that problem a number of times. It is often very subtle and not even intentional, as if their trying to do you a favor by not challenging you. Many people seek a younger personfor a position because they subconsciously want someone to mentor. J

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    California , Idaho and a little island in Panama
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    Kioti DK45TLB

    Default Re: Jobs and people over 40 years old.

    Interesting question .
    A college town might explain why young people are choosen more over older . Young people spend money and companies want young people to spend it in their companies . Load up a company with young people as employees and the "young money spenders" will relate . I would bet money, the big boys or bosses who rule are older ,but stay in the back ground as much as possible . Star Bucks is one example .
    Of course they may look at the years of service a younger employee might give a company over a older one if you were the boss . 40 does not seem to me to be that old ,but what do I know . I am older than dirt .
    No tax cuts were ever offered to me for hiring younger workers . Female or minority maybe , but not younger .
    What type of work is it ??? White collar ??? Blue collar ??? It does make a difference . I can somedays barely climb on a tractor , much less do it for 8 or 12 hours what I did at 25 . I can still do it ,and maybe even better ,but usually not as fast .
    My Dad had a saying which I really believe : Quote " If you can't see the end of the tunnel and be heading for the plus side on finances by 40 ,you might want to reconsider your career "unquote . At about 40, things started looking up for me and investments made 15 years earlier started to pay off .And yes, I know I was lucky and the good lord shined down on my little pointed head .
    I think you said it yourself . "You live in a college town" and maybe your talents would be better put to use some where else . I personally liked hiring older employees . They were more stable , family oriented, and had a better attitude for the most part . If you go to the school of " HARD KNOCKS" , like I did ,you will understand what I mean .
    Good luck in your search ,
    Al

  5. #5
    Platinum Member sneaky_pete's Avatar
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    Parker County, Texas and Santa Fe County, New Mexico
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    Kubota B7400HSD, G1800

    Default Re: Jobs and people over 40 years old.

    I found that at some point in my career (when I was about 45?) it was harder to find a different or a better job, because potential employers assumed that a) I would want too much money because of my years of experience, or b) I had been in management too long and couldn't do real work any more. My solution was to quit and go to work for myself. I get more money, more respect, and less stress as a consultant. I really like self-employment, but realize it's not for everyone. You have to have a real independent streak.

  6. #6
    Veteran Member
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    Default Re: Jobs and people over 40 years old.

    College students will likely work for less money. Other than that, I think as you age you are looked at as a probable physical liability. I also think you are looked at as being to set in your ways.

    I think that this is more so true with larger employers who do not want to take a chance on giving you a chance. The standard answer if you do happen to get a reply is while your qualifications are commendable, we have other more qualified applicants.

  7. #7
    Veteran Member Volfandt's Avatar
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    TN
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    2004 Kubota BX23, 1966 WheelHorse 856

    Default Re: Jobs and people over 40 years old.

    I haven't seen 40 in about a decade but whos counting anyways.... [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

    The company I worked for, for the last 16 yrs was bought out by a new outfit about a yr and a half ago. The new outfit didn't need me in the position I had held for 9 yrs but offered to keep me at "salary" if I agreed to go back out into the field, which is normally an hourly position. With a daughter still in college I begrudgingly ended up takeing them up on their offer.
    So I had to relearn a skill I had put on the backburner for quite sometime and learn new equipment. Ends up that I'm likeing the work but not the on-call duty and after hrs service calls with no overtime or on-call pay like the other techs.
    I went 1.5 yrs like this with no raises and no reviews so I then decided I wanted to make a move. It took time but I finally found a much larger company that liked the idea of my previous experience and is hireing me at the same base rate as my previous salary but as an hourly tech. On call pay and overtime included!
    I'm starting on my 2nd week off due to my previous employer letting me go after I gave 2 week notice. Thats fine with me as it will be awhile before I earn some paid vacation with the new employer.

    Don't let your age hold you back. Most employers that want younger individuals are basically looking for entry level and inexpensive employees and that may not be what your looking for.
    Try and make age and experience work in your favor. I know it can get discourageing but persistance will eventually pay off.

    40 yrs old tain't nothing young-un [img]/forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

    Good luck
    Volfandt

  8. #8
    Veteran Member tractorErnie's Avatar
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    Bahamas
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    Yanmars = Fx235- F255- FX335... branson 4220i tlb - hinomoto JF1 New Holland 7610 Branson 3510 tlb

    Default Re: Jobs and people over 40 years old.

    Old wise saying (young minds are easier to mold)

    Its hard to teach an old dog new tricks.

    Thats what my boss told me back in 74 when he hired me.
    I lasted 12 years there then went out on my own. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

  9. #9
    Gold Member
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    Default Re: Jobs and people over 40 years old.

    I'm 45 years old and having a problem in finding any kind of work in this college town. Wal-mart the other day in the news was found saying they are going to not hire older people because of the medical insurance problems. The state might train me in another career but I wonder if going to college will make a diffients.

    Terry.

  10. #10
    Gold Member CarlGlas's Avatar
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    The Great State of Texas
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    2005 MF GC2300

    Default Re: Jobs and people over 40 years old.

    Finding a new job isn't easy in this economy. It can be especially hard for people over age 40. They face age discrimination. Employers tend to believe younger candidates are more familiar with new technology, and they can pay younger employees less.

    Discrimination is usually subtle and not always deliberate, but the result is brutal. It takes people over age 40 nearly 40% longer to find new jobs as those under 35. The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 is intended to protect most people over age 40 from discrimination in hiring, layoffs, salary, promotion, assignments and training.

    Victims of age discrimination can sue employers or prospective employers -- but these cases are hard to prove. The employer can say that the candidate simply wasn't the best person for the job.

    The best strategy is to outsmart age discrimination.

    Here's how...

    Confront technology-skills stereotypes head-on. When a 25-year-old applies for a job, everyone assumes he has computer skills. When a 55-year-old applies, most people assume he/she doesn't.

    Self-defense: Mention technological expertise during interviews. On your résumé, list computer programs you know or certifications you have.

    Select appropriate companies and industries. If possible, visit the company to get a sense of its culture. If it doesn't feel like a good fit, look elsewhere. If you have been laid off from a youth-focused industry, emphasize your transferable skills or, if necessary, leave the industry.

    The technology, telecommunications and advertising sectors, for example, tend to favor younger hires.

    The banking, government and utility sectors frequently hire younger employees and promote from within. An older job applicant in these industries should angle for a consultant's role rather than a promotion-track position.

    Each year, AARP compiles a list of the top companies for older workers. To see the most recent list, go to www.aarp.org/bestemployers.

    Industries with the best opportunities now include teaching, health care and retail. Registered Nurses are in big demand across the country.

    Dress for success. Match the culture you're hoping to join, but also look sharp. Clothes are only as good as the body wearing them. Get in shape. Managers want to hire people who look like they could run -- and win -- a race.

    Show flexibility. A common stereotype holds that an older worker thinks his way is the only way to do things and he won't consider new ideas.

    Self-defense: Design a résumé that reflects a range of positions and changing responsibilities. This is especially important if you have worked for the same firm for many years.

    Example: Mention occasions when you implemented cutting-edge strategies.

    Play the role of "possibility thinker" in interviews. Mention a possible scenario, and run through the company's options should it actually occur. When young people do this, they come off as loose cannons trying to fix things that aren't broken. When older, more experienced people do it, they seem adaptable and innovative.

    Don't abbreviate your résumé -- contrary to standard advice. Some older applicants include only their most recent experience.

    Let your résumé run two or three pages, so long as each description is succinct and demonstrates your accomplishments. Don't try to hide your age by withholding employment dates. Emphasize how your experience can help the firm deal with problems.

    For information on your rights...

    AARP, www.aarp.org/careers.

    US Administration on Aging, www.aoa.gov.

    US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, www.eeoc.gov.


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