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  1. #11
    Old Timer Soundguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
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    51,818
    Location
    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: Deal or No Deal... used Coleman 6500H Generator

    At 450.. I think you could flip it if it did not please you, and make a few bucks on the deal.. easy..

    Soundguy

  2. #12
    Old Timer Soundguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    51,818
    Location
    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: Deal or No Deal... used Coleman 6500H Generator

    At 450.. I think you could flip it if it did not please you, and make a few bucks on the deal.. easy..

    Soundguy

  3. #13
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    194
    Location
    Collins, MS
    Tractor
    Mahindra 4110

    Default Re: Deal or No Deal... used Coleman 6500H Generator

    But it can run the "luxuries" while the other runs the necessities.

  4. #14
    Silver Member
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    May 2005
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    194
    Location
    Collins, MS
    Tractor
    Mahindra 4110

    Default Re: Deal or No Deal... used Coleman 6500H Generator

    But it can run the "luxuries" while the other runs the necessities.

  5. #15
    Super Member Highbeam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    5,039
    Location
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Tractor
    Kioti CK30HST

    Default Re: Deal or No Deal... used Coleman 6500H Generator

    The electric water heater is a biggy. I've seen them at 4000 watts. The well pump, if it is a 1 HP unit, will only need 750 watts once running and a bit more like 1000 at the startup surge.

    Check this out. You have a 6000 watt generator which means 6000 watts of 220 power. Each phase can only put out 3000 watts of 110 power to seperate appliances. You can't run one big 110 volt 6000 watt appliance.

    This means that the 4000 watt water heater will burn 2000 watts from each 110 volt leg. This leaves 1000 watts on each 110 volt leg for say a kitchen circuit that you put your fridge and lights on.

    If your well pump, assuming 220 and 1 HP, sucks another 500 from each 110 leg then you only have 500 watts left and your fridge needs more than that.

    I guess what I am saying is that you will need to manage your power needs with a 6000 watt generator. Not nearly as much power to go around as with the monster PTO machine.

    I have a 5500/6850 coleman and it works just fine. Good cheap power.


  6. #16
    Super Member Highbeam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    5,039
    Location
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Tractor
    Kioti CK30HST

    Default Re: Deal or No Deal... used Coleman 6500H Generator

    The electric water heater is a biggy. I've seen them at 4000 watts. The well pump, if it is a 1 HP unit, will only need 750 watts once running and a bit more like 1000 at the startup surge.

    Check this out. You have a 6000 watt generator which means 6000 watts of 220 power. Each phase can only put out 3000 watts of 110 power to seperate appliances. You can't run one big 110 volt 6000 watt appliance.

    This means that the 4000 watt water heater will burn 2000 watts from each 110 volt leg. This leaves 1000 watts on each 110 volt leg for say a kitchen circuit that you put your fridge and lights on.

    If your well pump, assuming 220 and 1 HP, sucks another 500 from each 110 leg then you only have 500 watts left and your fridge needs more than that.

    I guess what I am saying is that you will need to manage your power needs with a 6000 watt generator. Not nearly as much power to go around as with the monster PTO machine.

    I have a 5500/6850 coleman and it works just fine. Good cheap power.


  7. #17
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    664
    Location
    Fingerlakes Region, Upstate NY
    Tractor
    B7610HST

    Default Re: Deal or No Deal... used Coleman 6500H Generator

    The elec. water heater is 4500 watts.

    The well pump is a Goulds Pump 4", 6" or 8" according to the info the previous owner left. There is technical info for all but no direct table showing start watt surge and, short of pulling the pump, I have no idea which size/hp pump is down there. I will look at the breaker when I get home, specs say @ 230v 1/2hp = 15a, 3/4hp = 20a, 1hp = 25a and 1-1/2hp = 35a. Maybe that will give me a clue?

    The reefer is an older GE side-by-side model TFX24RG and not Energy Star Compliant. Not sure of exact start load and running load on this without looking for actual specs online. Btw, does that designation also imply a lower starting watt load?

    Last, the Carrier Heat Pump Cooling and Heating Split System is Model #38YRA042301. I believe the heat units were either 15-, 20-, 24-, or 30-kw for dual circuit operation. I need to open it up to see exactly what I have inless the model # tells someone familiar w/ Carrier.

  8. #18
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    664
    Location
    Fingerlakes Region, Upstate NY
    Tractor
    B7610HST

    Default Re: Deal or No Deal... used Coleman 6500H Generator

    The elec. water heater is 4500 watts.

    The well pump is a Goulds Pump 4", 6" or 8" according to the info the previous owner left. There is technical info for all but no direct table showing start watt surge and, short of pulling the pump, I have no idea which size/hp pump is down there. I will look at the breaker when I get home, specs say @ 230v 1/2hp = 15a, 3/4hp = 20a, 1hp = 25a and 1-1/2hp = 35a. Maybe that will give me a clue?

    The reefer is an older GE side-by-side model TFX24RG and not Energy Star Compliant. Not sure of exact start load and running load on this without looking for actual specs online. Btw, does that designation also imply a lower starting watt load?

    Last, the Carrier Heat Pump Cooling and Heating Split System is Model #38YRA042301. I believe the heat units were either 15-, 20-, 24-, or 30-kw for dual circuit operation. I need to open it up to see exactly what I have inless the model # tells someone familiar w/ Carrier.

  9. #19
    Super Member Highbeam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,039
    Location
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Tractor
    Kioti CK30HST

    Default Re: Deal or No Deal... used Coleman 6500H Generator

    Sounds like a pretty huge electrical load. You will need to manage your loads if you want to try and use that coleman as a whole house power source.

    1HP = approximately 746 watts. It is a direct conversion and doesn't matter if you use 230 volts or 110. So a well pump that needs 15 amps of 220 power to run is burning 3300 watts or about 4 HP and that's a big pump. Even doubling the needs for startup watts leaves you a 2HP pump and that is pretty huge. In our area we pumps of less than 1 HP almost always. Better assume at least 2000 watts for the well pump. Electricians have this handy tool that they clamp around a wire and it tells them the amps of power running through the wire, maybe you've a buddy with this tool since the breaker may not be a good enough indicator.

    My GE 18 CF fridge/freezer, a cheapy, has a sticker on the inside that states it needs 7 amps of 110 so 770 watts. It is a loud non energy efficient model that just won't die.



  10. #20
    Super Member Highbeam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,039
    Location
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Tractor
    Kioti CK30HST

    Default Re: Deal or No Deal... used Coleman 6500H Generator

    Sounds like a pretty huge electrical load. You will need to manage your loads if you want to try and use that coleman as a whole house power source.

    1HP = approximately 746 watts. It is a direct conversion and doesn't matter if you use 230 volts or 110. So a well pump that needs 15 amps of 220 power to run is burning 3300 watts or about 4 HP and that's a big pump. Even doubling the needs for startup watts leaves you a 2HP pump and that is pretty huge. In our area we pumps of less than 1 HP almost always. Better assume at least 2000 watts for the well pump. Electricians have this handy tool that they clamp around a wire and it tells them the amps of power running through the wire, maybe you've a buddy with this tool since the breaker may not be a good enough indicator.

    My GE 18 CF fridge/freezer, a cheapy, has a sticker on the inside that states it needs 7 amps of 110 so 770 watts. It is a loud non energy efficient model that just won't die.



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