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  1. #11
    New Member
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    Sep 2005
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    0

    Default Re: Garden Tiller

    Not on this site,I mean about the over kill part you said, there are many people on here you trully believe you need a tractor and a tiller for a garden spot that size,look on garden by net in the gardening section I believe,we taked about that a couple of weeks ago. RICHARD GAUTHIER

  2. #12
    New Member
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    Sep 2005
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    Default Re: Garden Tiller

    Of course I MEANT country by net,under gardening. RICHARD GAUTHIER

  3. #13
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    39,420
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Garden Tiller

    Patrick, I've used both front and rear tine tillers, and the front tine is much cheaper and not bad if you know how to use it; but if not, it'll beat you to death. The rear tine is definitely easier and I much prefer them, but of course you'll pay more for them. As others have said, Troybilt was kind of an industry standard, but since they sold out, I'm not too sure. I see some recommend at least an 8hp motor, and that's OK, but I think it depends on how wide a tiller you get. I've used a couple of 5hp tillers, including a really cheap one last year that my brother had bought at TSC and no way I could bog down the engine. And the last one I owned was a Craftsman counterrotating 5hp rear tine, 17" wide, and couldn't have asked for anything better. I only sold it to a friend after I bought the tractor powered tiller.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    29
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Tractor
    '71 New Holland S-14

    Default Re: Garden Tiller

    The troy-bilt tractor is definetly not like they used to be...Transmissions used to be cast, new ones are Stamped steel. The newer motors are better though. I got an old Ariens Rocket rear tine tiller with a 7hp Tecumseh cast iron motor. It weighs 300+ lbs. I have had to put some money in it, but since I got the tiller for free.... If I fix the carb, it would purr [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] .

    I do agree with most, rear tine is the way to go.

    Chad

  5. #15
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    178
    Tractor
    2010D

    Default Re: Garden Tiller

    I have a BCS 16 HP tiller that I have used for over 15 years with very little problems.
    They are quality machines that have a lot of great features: all gear drive four-speed transmissions like tractors, standard clutch, no belts, wheel brakes, locking differential, reverse which disengages the PTO, ability to run a variety of implements like tiller, chipper, mowers snow blowers etc.
    I use it for chipping branches and tilling mostly, and it has served me very well over the years.
    I would recommend a BCS without reservation. I feel that they are the best tillers made.
    Thanks,
    Cameron
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #16
    New Member
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    Sep 2005
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    0

    Default Re: Garden Tiller

    Patrick

    BCS !! BCS !! BCS !!

    Yes, I'm prejudice, but with their track record and versatility and durability it's hard not to be. Check their web site www.bcs-america.com
    I own an 850 (12hp) with most attachments and am very impressed. I've been around equipment like this my whole life and like anyone I like owning good equipment. My only real complaint with BCS is I wish they offered even more attachments than they do. (eg. leave blower, log splitter, etc)


    Richard

  7. #17
    New Member
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    Sep 2005
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    0

    Default Re: Garden Tiller

    Patrick

    Forgot

    For breaking new ground the Berta rotary plow that attaches to the BCS tractor is absolutely awesome! It's also great for making rasies beds. Talk to Joel at www.bcssmallfarmequip.com you'll find his phone # on this site

    Richard

  8. #18
    New Member
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    Sep 2005
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    0

    Default Re: Garden Tiller

    The above post should say "raised beds".

  9. #19
    New Member
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    Sep 2005
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    0

    Default Re: Garden Tiller

    poorboy,
    I've got a barely used (under 10 hrs.) Troybilt Pony (5 hp Briggs) for sale. I bought it in '99 to replace an Airens 3 hp front tine that still runs and will keep for cultivating. MTD bought out Troybilt as mentioned before, and the new units are a lot lighter duty (though I don't know if they've cheaped out the horse models).
    When I got my bx, I went for a 3ph tiller so the troybilt is just sitting around getting dusty.
    DaveL

  10. #20
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    338
    Location
    santa barbara, ca
    Tractor
    kubota b7200hst

    Default Re: Garden Tiller

    The way I see things, tillers come in 5 sizes.

    You start off with the mantis / ryobi cultivator. The sales literature says you can break ground with it. I seriously doubt it. I bought the cultivator attachment on a whim and tried to cultivate my "well tilled" garden. What a joke.

    One BIG step up are the front tine tillers. These are very popular with homeowners. They will do a decent job at breaking ground if you are persistent. They have a tendency to "bounce" when they hit hard ground so you are basically hanging on for dear life while it bounces around trying to break into the ground. It works, but can be a rough ride. I still own one as it is much easier to heft into raised beds than a bigger unit.

    The next step up would be a rear tine tiller. These have wheels in the front, then the tines, then the handles. These too bounch, but you get to use your weight to hold them down. Not sure if that makes them easier on your back or harder.

    I personally separate the walk behind tractors from the rear tine tillers. BCS is one of the walk behind tractors. I suppose the only difference between a rear tine tiller and a walk behind tractor is that you change the attachments. They make snow blowers, spaders, plows, mowers, ... for walk behind tractors.

    Finally, there are PTO powered 3pt tillers.

    I bought a 5hp MTD brand tiller about ten years ago. I used it to maintain a modest garden at the old house and to prepare both the front and rear yard for new lawn at the old house. It worked fine. It was a lot less effort than digging with a shovel even though it was a bit rough on the body.

    We moved a couple of years ago and I decided to bring back the garden the former owners had established. I dug out the 5hp front tine tiller and started working on it. Two full days later I was done. The next year I tried the same technique hoping that my work the previous year would make things easier. I bounced all over the garden tearing it up some, but never got a real deep dig. The ground was just too hard and I was not going to spend 2 full days at it again. I went down to the rent-a-yard and rented a 10 hp rear tine tiller. I got it for half a day. I returned it 20 minutes late with a late fee and crawled home and to bed. It was just plain mean. I did not get a deep dig with it either. Every time the blades engaged it lept forward pulling all 225 pounds of me with it. Playing with the depth setting did not help much. I went back to the front tine tiller and just dug "holes" for the tomatoes that year with it.

    Finally, when buying the kubota, I made a tiller a primary item on the "must have" list. Lemme tell you, it is a night vs day difference. I get to sit on the tractor and feather the hydro petal and the machine does the work. The only "bad" aspects of using a 3pt hitch tiller are that you can not get very close to the edges. The initial dig tosses a mound of dirt where you start and you have a ditch where you stop. There may be technique issues going on, but lemme tell you... I can feel the tiller try to push the 1500 pound tractor when it hits hard dirt. I am one happy camper that the machine is taking the beating instead of me.

    So, I guess it depends a lot on what type of soil you have as well as what you have going on around the garden. It makes a big difference whether you have room to manuver outside the garden or not. If I did not have the kubota I would probably seriously consider one of the walk behind tractor units. The availibility of a brush cutter, a finish mower, a snow blower, a cart, a chipper as well as a tiller make them interesting machines, especially if you opt for the 10-12 hp model.

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