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  1. #21

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    421
    Location
    East Central Mo
    Tractor
    TC40 16LA FEL w-QT & 758c BH

    Default Re: Buying a rototiller

    tlphlps:

    Thanks for reply. Glad your experience has been good. Hope to get mine in a bit.

    Guess my objection to lumping the BCS with equipment like Troybilts is that they really aren't the same thing. Calling the BCS a "tiller" is like calling your CUT a "lawn mower" because that's what you're using it for today. With the BCS and applicable implements, just like your kubota, you can use it today as a "shredder" to reduce organic material for your compost pile, use it tomorrow as a "lawn mower" for cutting your grass, use it next week as a "tiller" for your garden, use it next month as a "chipper" for getting rid of branches on that tree you just cut down, use it in the fall as a "potato digger", use it 6 months from now as a "snow plow" or "snow blower". These things are as flexible as the CUT and for many situations on small properties can, for many uses, replace the CUT.

    I'm not suggesting that they are "better" than a CUT-although for some uses they are. I used my Gravely (with a 48" dozer blade) for snow plowing even though I have a CUT (NH TC40) with blade because in tight places, or close to the house, it's easier to maneuver. I had duallies on both of them and got excellent traction. You can put duallies on the BCS as well. Of course, the CUT can certainly "out muscle" any two wheeler and a CUT is probably more "fun" to use. The old Gravelies had 30-40 implements including a small BH with the hydraulic pump driven by the PTO. Handy for getting into real tight places. Never had one but have seen literature on it (not that I would trade my NH backhoe for one!).

    Anyway, thanks for reply. Like I said above, my objection is lumping the BCS with Troybilt (not that the older, larger Troybilts weren't good machines). The BCS (and older gravelies) are "real" tractors (power source) for doing a multitude of jobs and every bit as flexible as a CUT. For some properties they are probably better (and cheaper as well).

    By the way, your 716 is not the smallest BCS. I am going with an 850 (their 9xx is toooo big and not as flexible) as it has free wheeling differential (or can be locked-just like the diff lock on your Kubota), dual, individually controlled braking (just like on a "real" CUT), etc.. Havn't decided whether to stick with gas or go diesel though.

    Take care.

    JEH


  2. #22

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    421
    Location
    East Central Mo
    Tractor
    TC40 16LA FEL w-QT & 758c BH

    Default Re: Buying a rototiller

    Yankee:

    <font color="blue"> I'm thinking for the lawn, which is a former pasture, that I can progressively (over years, that is) aerate and top-dress with sand and compost a couple times per year. Think it will work (I'm patient) or should I need to till in amendments? </font>

    Myself (and I don't claim to be an expert) I would till in. You want everything "mixed" together. I would over winter rye &amp; till/plow in the spring. Also, I would throw a bunch of old drywall on it before tilling (cheaper than lime!). If you want to build humus quickly, try a succession cropping and till in (I believe you can get 3 plantings of buckwheat per year). Also, if your "hardpan" is really bad (like an impermeable plow hardpan), I would run over it deep ripping to facilitate drainage and water migration (up &amp; down).

    JEH

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