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  1. #1
    Bronze Member
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    Jun 2005
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    Water Valley, Tennessee

    Default Weed Control in Hay Fields

    I have about 60 acres in hay fields in middle Tennessee that have not been harvested or maintained in quite some time. I bush hogged them recently and noticed that some areas are overtaken with weeds. Is there any advice on what I should use to control the weeds? I have a 3-pt mounted spreader so I would prefer something granular vs. a liquid herbicide.

    Also, what is the best way to tell what type of hay I have? I do not want to make a mistake and kill an entire field of hay.

    Thanks,
    Mike
    New Holland TC35DA, 16LA FEL, 2-6' Bush Hogs, 6' Rake, 3 pt Spreader, 6' Box Blade, 12" PHD

  2. #2
    Silver Member KrumpsBrother's Avatar
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    CenTex
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    Farmtrac 675DTC/Kubota B7800/BCS 2Wheel with ACME 6.5hp

    Default Re: Weed Control in Hay Fields

    Skip the granular.
    A spray application of Grazon P+D will take care of the weeds. You can also use a generic 2-4d based product as well.

    SKIP the shredding during the growing season. Spray early during the growing season when weeds are young. Spray again if needed in the summer when weeds are still growing or after haying.

    Get a soil test done also & fertilize according to desired hay yields.

    Contact your local ag extension agent for hay type and more info for your area.

    Good Luck!
    KB
    '96 Ford Ranger
    '92 Old Town Canoe w/2.5hp Cuss & Carry
    1 Bad Case of Wiskey Tango

  3. #3
    Super Star Member EddieWalker's Avatar
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    Tyler, Texas
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    Several, all used and abused.

    Default Re: Weed Control in Hay Fields

    Can you give more information on Grazon and 2-4D?

    It seems that both are mentioned quite often, so I'm assuming this is the good stuff and what most of you use? What is the difference between them? Is one better then the other, or do they work together? Do you spray one, then wait a certain amount of time to spray the other?

    Thanks,
    Eddie

  4. #4
    Silver Member KrumpsBrother's Avatar
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    Farmtrac 675DTC/Kubota B7800/BCS 2Wheel with ACME 6.5hp

    Default Re: Weed Control in Hay Fields

    Grazon is 2-4d plus picloram. The picloram provides a longer control of weeds than the 2-4d alone. I used grazon this year in my hay pastures, and there are NO weeds. I also use it for prickly pear (cactus) and mesquite control.

    It is a restricted use herbicide, so you will need to attend a one day class to get your applicators liscense. Contact your local ag extension agent as most of them have at least 2 classes a year.

    KB
    '96 Ford Ranger
    '92 Old Town Canoe w/2.5hp Cuss & Carry
    1 Bad Case of Wiskey Tango

  5. #5
    Super Star Member EddieWalker's Avatar
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    Default Re: Weed Control in Hay Fields

    OK, makes sense. I've been trying to find out about both of them and it's rather confusing. Now that I know Grazon is 2, 4-D with extras added, that's what I want!!!

    I'm on the Texas A&M website and see they have two classes every year. One in March, the other in April. Cost is $350 and includes meals for three days. It's called "Pasture & Livestock Management Workshop for the Novice" and sounds like something I really should attend.

    I don't think it's what you are refering too, so I'm gonna have to keep looking for that class. I'm going to send them an email to get my name on next years list and ask about getting a license too.

    Thanks,
    Eddie

  6. #6
    Veteran Member
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    Oct 2006
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    Default Re: Weed Control in Hay Fields

    2,4D is Weed-b-Gone
    Handles broadleaf weeds (dandelions etc).
    You need to keep your animals off for 7 days
    You can't hay it for 21 days.
    Lots of other rules for other chemicals.

    Remember, if you don't have strong grass behind it, spraying does puts off the weeds for a while. You need a strong grass system to choke out the weeds. Spraying is but one part of a pasture management program.

    Actually cutting quite often before the weeds go to seed will get good control of most weeds without spraying. (it wastes all their energy), "dont' let your weeds go to seed"

  7. #7
    Veteran Member BillyP's Avatar
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    Eagletown, OK
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    JD 4610 ehydro MFWD

    Default Re: Weed Control in Hay Fields

    Mike and Eddie, as previously posted, contact your local Ag extension agent. It's free, it's what they do and they're good at it.

  8. #8
    Veteran Member
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    Dec 2003
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    GA, TN
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    Kubota L4330HST

    Default Re: Weed Control in Hay Fields

    I used Dow "Remedy" up around Gainesboro TN, mostly because I was overrun with lespideza (sp?) which is tough to kill, and I found some university tests of various herbicides indicating that it was by far the best of various formulas tested. I bought it at the coop, and was not asked for any licensing. It was a bit pricey, about $70/gallon, but I did about 15 acres, plus both sides of my 1/2 mi driveway with a little over a gallon. Active ingredient is 62% triclopyr. Non-lactating livestock can graze it immediately after application. It does kill clover, so I need to reseed some of that! It worked terrific on everything that I actually got covered!! I recommend a "colorant" so you can see what's covered and what's not!

    - Jay

  9. #9
    Silver Member KrumpsBrother's Avatar
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    Farmtrac 675DTC/Kubota B7800/BCS 2Wheel with ACME 6.5hp

    Default Re: Weed Control in Hay Fields

    Quote Originally Posted by LoneCowboy
    Actually cutting quite often before the weeds go to seed will get good control of most weeds without spraying. (it wastes all their energy), "dont' let your weeds go to seed"
    Excessive cutting of pastures for weeds control will cause:

    A shallow root system; bottom growth (roots) will be directly proportional to the top growth of the forage. A shallow root system will cause a decline in the forage due to decreased moisture and nutrient uptake.

    An increase in soil temperature due to more sunlight reaching the soil surface. The increase in soil temperature will cause even more weed seed to germinate. Once germination has occured, the increase in sunlight will help the weeds grow quicker due to lack of shading by shorter cut forage. The increased soil temperature will cause the soil to dry out quicker.

    Soil compaction. As a result, air, moisture and nutrients will have a harder time reaching the root zone. Excessive soil compaction will cause hardpan requiring subsoiling.


    A single application of Grazon P+D will control weeds in pastures all season, leaving the forage intact to be better utilized by the stock, or baled for future use. The weeds will not go to seed if they're not there to begin with. The only waste of energy is mowing a pasture repeatedly to try to gain control of weeds.

    This is how I manage my pastures:
    January-Shred last years grass residue. Send soil test off.
    April-Fertilize and apply herbicide as needed according to soil test results and desired yields determined by myself and fertilizer company.
    May/June-Bale. Put neighbors stock(cattle) on after post bale greenup.
    August-Rent pasture aerator, aerate.
    August/Sept-Remove neighbors stock.
    Sept-Bale if conditions are good.
    Nov-Move neighbors stock on to graze off dormant forage residue. Must supplement feed with molasses or cubes for winter.

    KB
    '96 Ford Ranger
    '92 Old Town Canoe w/2.5hp Cuss & Carry
    1 Bad Case of Wiskey Tango

  10. #10
    Silver Member
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    Mar 2007
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    No. Central OK

    Default Re: Weed Control in Hay Fields

    I can't add much to KB's post; very well said. Mowing costs money which is, in most cases, better spent on more productive pasture management practices.

    Goals are different however. We treat our hayfields differently than our pastures; the two acres in front of the house is another story. I think the first thing a person should do is establish a goal for the piece of land, a budget, and then a management plan.

    A weed in one pasture is fodder in another.

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