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  1. #1
    Silver Member wjoerob's Avatar
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    Default Cattle: fencing & stream access?

    Can anybody offer some suggestions? I have 5 Highlander cattle, and we are all just getting used to each other. They are strong and stubborn, and have long horns. I need to put them in a small pasture (2-3 ac.) for a while. Wife has heard that they will stay in an area with 2 electric wires, charger and "step-in" posts. Could install wood/metal posts with woven wire if really necessary. I would also like to allow them to get water from a small stream at the back of the lot. But how can I make the fence set up so they can get to stream water and not get out?

  2. #2
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Default Re: Cattle: fencing & stream access?

    I know nothing about Highlander cattle, but as for 2 strands of electric fence keeping them in . . . maybe.

    I could show you some places where a single strand of electric wire keeps a herd of cattle in, and another place where a single strand keeps a herd of goats in. On the other hand, I saw a neighbor try to keep cattle out of a hay storage area with two strands and the cattle tore it down. The problem is that the animals have to be "trained" to respect the wire, and I'm not sure how big a job that might be. The electric fence that was torn down was because when a cow touched it and was shocked, she'd charge straight ahead instead of backing off.
    Bird

  3. #3
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
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    Default Re: Cattle: fencing & stream access?

    Just a cautionary word as I know not what applies in your area.

    Where I live giving cattle access to a steam would not be in compliance with the laws of the land.
    Egon
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  4. #4
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    Default Re: Cattle: fencing & stream access?

    Quote Originally Posted by Egon View Post
    Just a cautionary word as I know not what applies in your area.

    Where I live giving cattle access to a steam would not be in compliance with the laws of the land.


    Giving cattle access to a steam is done all over this county.
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Cattle: fencing & stream access?

    Quote Originally Posted by LBrown59 View Post
    Giving cattle access to a steam is done all over this county.
    Isn"t it a joke in light of some of the extreme measures to protect waterways and water sheds? Cattle polute and cause erosion of the stream banks. In Va. if you get Gov. help with fencing, it must be 30ft. from a natural water source.Makes sense to me.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Cattle: fencing & stream access?

    Letting cattle access a stream is a good way to make the stream a mess and your cattle smaller! If you really must use stream water, cut a slough back from the stream and fence the entrance and the stream.

  7. #7
    Epic Contributor jinman's Avatar
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    Default Re: Cattle: fencing & stream access?

    Quote Originally Posted by wjoerob View Post
    But how can I make the fence set up so they can get to stream water and not get out?
    What my neighbor did was to fence across the creek, down the bank on the other side, and then back across the creek. If you do this, I'd stop the electric before going across the stream and use barbed wire or field fencing above the water. Hook a couple of cow panels on the bottom of the wire that spans the creek. Weight the cow panels by tieing cinder blocks or rocks snugly to the bottom. The weight of the blocks will hold the cow panels vertical except when you get a heavy rain. Then, the panels can swing up to allow water and debris to pass under.

    You may have to add a few strands of wire stronger than the field fence to hold the weight of the weighted cow panels. I've seen long creek crossings where anchors had to be built on each side using concrete and cable had to be strung between them to carry the weight of the swinging bottom fence panels. The size of your stream and the lay of the land will determine how big your job will be.
    Jim


  8. #8
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    Default Re: Cattle: fencing & stream access?

    I run field fence up until 100 feet of banks. Then barbed wire. Both sides.

    Problem is it still catches debris. It is easier for us to bring water to cattle, than have cattle in the water.

    Check you local regulations.

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