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  1. #61
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Building a gun range, suggestions?

    Some of us have to wear safety glasses full time ( my prescrip glasses are ansi spec! )

    soundguy

  2. #62
    Veteran Member foggy1111's Avatar
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    Default Re: Building a gun range, suggestions?

    I have reloaded for well over 25 years now. Many thousands of rounds. Mostly rifle ammo - for most of the popular cartridges through 30 caliber (I just don't have much need for the heavier stuff). Pretty good information on the steps of reloading here...but I may add:

    The advice about a reloading book cannot be under-emphasized. IMO the very first purchase should be the Hornady Manual. Read and understand the section in the front about the mechanics of reloading....about 40 or so pages. I think most people would need to read it several times to grasp what is really being said here....especially the information related to pressure.

    I also think a reloading mentor is very helpful. I never had anyone to teach me and I learned by reading and doing.....but I also made a few mistakes early on. I never got hurt....was careful...but some things are easier to learn by having a mentor. A little show and tell goes a long way.

    As far as equipment goes.....you definitely don't need a heavy-duty press for reloading and those starter kits by RSBS and others are great. (I have 6 or more presses accumulated over time and prefer the little RCBS "Partner" over others for most of my needs)

    As a side note....I used to manufacture some specialty reloading tools for competitive and benchrest shooters and accuracy buffs...therefore I have too much stuff...lol My hobby/passion became a good biz for me after a number of years. Many competive shooters use a little RCBS Partner press for their reloading purposes....you don't need to spend a bundle on a press.

    It's a VERY satisfying hobby that will make you a better shooter....and so much can be learned about physics, precision, process control etc etc.

    I now have two grandsons who are learning to shoot....and I am teaching them a few of the basics of reloading and shooting as they become ready for it. I'm just finishing up about 1000 rounds of some 223 practice ammo for them to learn with over the summer....along with some rim fire and air rifle ammo. Total cost of 1000 rounds of 223 ammo is well under $100 as I have so many components from time gone by.
    3320 eHydro, 300CX Loader & 15 + great attachments

    You gotta mine allot of dirt to find a diamond.

  3. #63
    Elite Member DieselPower's Avatar
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    Default Re: Building a gun range, suggestions?

    The Hornady manual is a great manual. Kind of ticked me off last time they printed it though, they removed volume 2 with all the ballistic data. They tell you "Check online". Just what I want to do, run upstairs to the computer to get some ballistic data that use to be in a book. Grrrrr. Thank god I'm a pack rat and don't ever throw anything away. I still have all the previous editions that actually had a volume 2. The Hornady manual does have nice color pictures.

    Actually I think the Sierra book is better. It really goes over the details better in my opinion. And for the advanced reloader it has a excellent section on exterior ballistics and a great reference section.

  4. #64
    Super Member Dargo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Building a gun range, suggestions?

    Ok, now my head is spinning. I did manage an "A" in calculus in college but absolutely hated it. I'd rather take advanced applied physics or organic chemistry again than calculus. This isn't gonna be like reading calculus books again is it?
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  5. #65
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Building a gun range, suggestions?

    I think I got a B in calc.. and also hated it..

    soundguy

  6. #66
    Veteran Member foggy1111's Avatar
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    Default Re: Building a gun range, suggestions?

    Relax fellah's....if there was any heavy lifting math involved....I would not be a reloader either.
    3320 eHydro, 300CX Loader & 15 + great attachments

    You gotta mine allot of dirt to find a diamond.

  7. #67
    Elite Member DieselPower's Avatar
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    Default Re: Building a gun range, suggestions?

    Nope, no heavy math need at all. If you can add, subtract, multiply and divide you have all the math skills you will ever need to reload. The ballistic data I'm talking about that use to be in Hornady's volume 2 book basically gives you bullet drop for a bullet with a given weight, sectional density and ballistic coefficient at different ranges depending on the velocity. It's very handy for figuring bullet drop over different distances at the range (no computer needed). This is what is known as exterior ballistics, what happens to the bullet after it leaves the barrel. Interior ballistics is what happens from the time you pull the trigger until the bullet reaches the end of the barrel. Interior ballistics is what you have a greater control over when you hand load. You can fine tune your ammunition for a specific gun giving it the best interior ballistics possible.

    Here's a example of exterior ballisics using a 50 BMG round. Using a Hornady 750 grain A-Max bullet that has a sectional density of 0.412 and a ballistic coefficient of 1.050. If my muzzle velocity is 2850 fps(feet per second) and the rifle is zeroed at let's say 1,000 yards here is the bullet drop given in the book. This bullet going at 2850 fps will have 13524 ft/lb of energy at the muzzle.

    At 100 yards the round would be going 2761 fps and hit 23.3 inch's high with 12697 ft/lb energy.
    At 200 yards the round would be going 2675 fps and hit 43.6 inch's high with 11911 ft/lb energy.
    At 400 yards the round would be going 2506 fps and hit 69.3 inch's high with 10455 ft/lb energy.
    At 1000 yards the round would be going 2036 fps and hit dead center with 6904 ft/lb energy.
    At 1400 yards the round would be going 1755 fps and hit -208.0 inch's low with 5126 ft/lb energy.
    At 1760 yards the round would be going 1527 fps and hit -549.5 inch's low with 3883 ft/lb energy.

    So what good is all that mumbo jumbo. It allows you to zero your weapon and know approximately how high or low the round will hit at a given velocity at different ranges and with how much energy. In addition to being handy at the range it's priceless when hunting over long distances. Let's say your Moose hunting with a 338 Lapua Mag zeroed at 400 yards and you see a Moose at 1000 yards. If you have this type data taped to your stock you know approximately how much the bullet will drop at 1000 yards and you can compensate for it, no guessing involved.

    The Hornady volume 2 also use to have wind drift tables. Knowing the cross wind using a known bullet you could look up how much the wind would deflect the bullet at different ranges. Using the same 50 BMG bullet with a muzzle velocity of 2800 fps a 90 degree cross wind would deflect the bullet .2 inch's at 100 yards, .9 inch's at 200 yards, 2.1 inch's at 300 yards, 8.8 inch's at 600 yards, 16.2 inch's at 800 yards, 26.2 inch's at 1000 yards. This manual also has uphill/downhill correction tables. Simply, the book is priceless for the long range shooter. Does the average shooter need it for hunting in the bush at 50 yards with his 30-30 lever action, no. But if you get into long range competition shooting or hunting it is a real time saver. There's plenty of computer programs out there that will do all these calculations for you(heck, they have wrist watch's that do it now) but I don't have a computer in my loading room or when I'm at the range. I can easily take the book with me.

    The exterior ballistics section in the Sierra manual goes over in detail the why's and how's of all that mumbo jumbo above. Even for the general shooter it can really give them a edge if they better understand what happens to their round after it leaves the barrel. It just makes you a better and more confident shooter in the end. As they say you can never know to much.

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