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  1. #21
    Silver Member wjoerob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    168
    Location
    Franklin IN
    Tractor
    Kubota 6100

    Default Re: Geothermal Prices in 2009

    We had a Tranquility geothermal installed in our house when we built it 4 yrs. ago. 27 SEER and the whole house (2400 sq. ft.) is electric. We've been very pleased, though I wish we had put zone controls in. The kids in upstairs bedrooms complain of uneven heat and cooling. Highest electric bill was last month, just over $300. Horizontal loops, 300 ft., 2 runs, one at 3 ft., the other at 5 ft. deep. Combined with THICK blown expanding foam insulation, does the job. Unfortunately, the doofus local contractor who installed it left one of the duct runs hanging open in the crawlspace, so we were heating the crawlspace too for the first year!

  2. #22
    Silver Member wjoerob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    168
    Location
    Franklin IN
    Tractor
    Kubota 6100

    Default Re: Geothermal Prices in 2009

    Sorry, forgot to include the price of our system 4 yrs. ago here in central Indiana was about $15,000. The kicker is that you can find figures all over the board on how long these systems take to pay for themselves.

  3. #23
    Silver Member Hammy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    168
    Location
    Spokane, WA
    Tractor
    Kubota MX5000 4x4

    Default Re: Geothermal Prices in 2009

    This is my third winter with our Waterfurnace 6 ton geothermal unit. I have horizontal runs in my field that are 6-8' deep.

    When it was installed, I paid about $18,000-20,000 for it and I rented the equipment and dug the trenches myself. I would highly recommend it and do it again in a heart beat.

    I did have it serviced this winter and the guy told me it would now cost about $30,000 for the same unit. However, that was just him saying that, not an accurate quote.

    We have been able to claim it on our taxes each year. I think 10% a year so not only am I paying very little to have a 72 degree house in the winter but we get a nice chunk back each year on our taxes for it.

    Our house is large and open and we just leave the thermostat set at 72 in the winter and about 76 or so (if I remember correctly) in the summer.

    I would recommend getting one with a de-superheater? I believe that is what its called. Anyway, from what I was told, it has to be ordered with it and can not be retrofitted after the fact. It will use the expended heat to heat your hot water, which is by far the cheapest way to go from what I've seen.

    I thought that is what I was getting but after the guys got it into my basement, it was realized it didn't have the de-super heater on it. I kept it anyway but now wish I would have had them get the correct one.

    I have a tankless LP water heater, which is nice but no where near as efficient as the geothermal set up. Initially, when I was given a yearly cost to run breakdown, it was about $750 a year for heat, $20 a year for cooling, and $70 a year for hot water. I pay a lot more then that for the hot water running the tankless LP system but I don't run out of hot water either.
    Kubota MX5000 4x4, Woods LC108 loader w/72" Q/A bucket, Woods BH90-X backhoe w/ hyd. thumb, tooth bar, ANBO GR-M6 grapple, loaded R-4 tires.

    AND A GREAT WIFE!

  4. #24
    Elite Member buckeyefarmer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    3,995
    Location
    MD
    Tractor
    Kubota L3940 L5030 MF205-4

    Default Re: Geothermal Prices in 2009

    thanks for all the feedback so far. I have not gotten my quote yet. my quote will be for the waterfurnace external split units (I think).
    L3940HSTC, QA FEL, BH92
    L5030HST,QA,FEL
    MF 205-4
    Husqvarna YTH24V48LS (the other orange)
    KK Finish Mower, KK Tiller, 6' rotary mower, Pallet forks, PHD, Blade, Carryall, cultivator, 2 wheel barrows, assorted gardening tools,
    http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/r...life-farm.html

  5. #25
    Elite Member whistlepig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    4,267
    Location
    Preble County, Ohio
    Tractor
    Kubota B7800 with FEL

    Default Re: Geothermal Prices in 2009

    We bought our house about 18 months ago and it came with a closed loop horizontal geothermal system and a Water Furnace. It also has the de-superheater. The system was installed in 1999 when the house was built. The guy we bought it from said he paid $14,000 to have the geothermal installed. I knew nothing about geothermal until we moved here. It's an extremely impressive system. We had fuel oil before we moved here. The house that we have now has twice the square footage but costs 75% less to heat and cool.

  6. #26
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    1,018
    Location
    N.E. PA
    Tractor
    BX22

    Default Re: Geothermal Prices in 2009

    I have installed several geo systems (for my small side business). 0Equipment prices have gone up in the last few years, with the material shortages and all. But it is still not that bad. A lot of guys dramatically overcharge for geo systems. The price can vary on the installation. A vertical well (closed loop) will cost the most. Average about $25K. It will fin on a small lot, but the driller gets most of the cash. You need average 150' of hole per ton. Usually 3 holes does the trick.

    A horizontal loop is the cheapest. You need 200'-250' per ton. Deeper the better, but most go in at 7-10' deep. If you can trench it yourself, you can save quite a bit of money, and be installed around $10K average. More if someone digs for you. You need special equipment to join the pipe, as mechanical fittings are not used.

    Open loop wells can be cheap as well if water is not too deep. They are the most efficient as the ground water is constant. However running costs do go up as needed to pump water out of the well. Also nearly all of the service calls I have done on geo systems are open loop, due to water issues. Dirt, scale, minerals and corrosion can all cause reliability and repair issues with the unit.

    A couple of years ago I did a posting series on geo:

    http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/r...p-project.html

    You might find it interesting

    paul

  7. #27
    Elite Member buckeyefarmer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    3,995
    Location
    MD
    Tractor
    Kubota L3940 L5030 MF205-4

    Default Re: Geothermal Prices in 2009

    Quote Originally Posted by techman View Post
    I have installed several geo systems (for my small side business). 0Equipment prices have gone up in the last few years, with the material shortages and all. But it is still not that bad. A lot of guys dramatically overcharge for geo systems. The price can vary on the installation. A vertical well (closed loop) will cost the most. Average about $25K. It will fin on a small lot, but the driller gets most of the cash. You need average 150' of hole per ton. Usually 3 holes does the trick.

    A horizontal loop is the cheapest. You need 200'-250' per ton. Deeper the better, but most go in at 7-10' deep. If you can trench it yourself, you can save quite a bit of money, and be installed around $10K average. More if someone digs for you. You need special equipment to join the pipe, as mechanical fittings are not used.

    Open loop wells can be cheap as well if water is not too deep. They are the most efficient as the ground water is constant. However running costs do go up as needed to pump water out of the well. Also nearly all of the service calls I have done on geo systems are open loop, due to water issues. Dirt, scale, minerals and corrosion can all cause reliability and repair issues with the unit.

    A couple of years ago I did a posting series on geo:

    http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/r...p-project.html

    You might find it interesting

    paul
    I've read this before, but read over it again, a lot slower this time. Thanks for writing this up, very informative, and also illustrates that there is a lot more physical work to install than one might think. It might be possible for me to have the trench dug. I definitely can handle the backfill. I did tell the guy giving me the quote that I will do the ductwork modifications to put the new upstairs unit in a different location than the existing AH.
    I noticed some installers will loop the pipe, I assume to decrease the trench length. I also noticed some go out and return in the same straight trench, instead of a circle like you did. I'm considering taking a geothermal piping design course, if I can attend one in my area.
    I have a friend who's son works for a company that has put in some geo systems. I'm gonna see if I can hit him up for some advice also.
    Again, thanks for all the feedback.
    L3940HSTC, QA FEL, BH92
    L5030HST,QA,FEL
    MF 205-4
    Husqvarna YTH24V48LS (the other orange)
    KK Finish Mower, KK Tiller, 6' rotary mower, Pallet forks, PHD, Blade, Carryall, cultivator, 2 wheel barrows, assorted gardening tools,
    http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/r...life-farm.html

  8. #28
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    3,106
    Location
    Meridian Idaho
    Tractor
    Kubota B7100D

    Default Re: Geothermal Prices in 2009

    Has anyone worked with a pond loop system? I am curious how you calculate how big a body of water you need versus your load?

    Putting plastic pipe coils in the pond seems a lot easier than drilling wells or lots of trenching. I came across these Slim Jim heat exchangers as well:

    AWEB Supply

  9. #29
    Veteran Member Flatheadyoungin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1,074
    Location
    Southern, OH
    Tractor
    New Holland TC45 Shuttle

    Default Re: Geothermal Prices in 2009

    be sure to keep us posted......i'm planning on doing most of my install myself.....i may pay for the heat load and design but i'll install as much as i can

    Quote Originally Posted by buckeyefarmer View Post
    I've read this before, but read over it again, a lot slower this time. Thanks for writing this up, very informative, and also illustrates that there is a lot more physical work to install than one might think. It might be possible for me to have the trench dug. I definitely can handle the backfill. I did tell the guy giving me the quote that I will do the ductwork modifications to put the new upstairs unit in a different location than the existing AH.
    I noticed some installers will loop the pipe, I assume to decrease the trench length. I also noticed some go out and return in the same straight trench, instead of a circle like you did. I'm considering taking a geothermal piping design course, if I can attend one in my area.
    I have a friend who's son works for a company that has put in some geo systems. I'm gonna see if I can hit him up for some advice also.
    Again, thanks for all the feedback.
    TC45 Shuttle, 270 hours, 758C backhoe, 16LA loader

    Well, I looks like I just bought myself a lot of work.....

  10. #30
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    3,304
    Location
    Virginia
    Tractor
    1949 farmall, 1961 Fordson Dexta, 1986 Duetz Allis, 2001 Kubota.

    Default Re: Geothermal Prices in 2009

    I posted before, I have a friend who's house is next to a cave... heat pump unit is in the cave (50 degrees year round)... Very efficient but he still burns wood because he has so much!

    mark
    red tractor
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    too many impliments to list

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