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  1. #1
    Gold Member Piperflyer's Avatar
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    Default Kitchen Flooring

    Would like to know what you recommend for a new kitchen floor and the ease of self installation. I need to decide if I want tile, laminate or real wood. Would like to see your installation if you have pictures.
    'Life's Journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a
    well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting, 'Holy S... What a Ride!!

  2. #2
    Gold Member
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    Default Re: Kitchen Flooring

    I just helped my brother install peel and stick squares in the kitchen of his rental. I put them in a bathroom in our previous house also. Pretty easy install. Can't speak to the longevity though. Peel off the backing, stick it to your existing floor. Repeat. Trim to fit along the edges. Just make sure you get your first one in the best place as the rest will follow (make sure its square, etc).

    Keith

  3. #3
    Elite Member czechsonofagun's Avatar
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    Default

    We installed cork tiles in the kitchen. Very resiliant and warm on touch.
    Regards,

    Prokop


    I was put on Earth to accomplish a certain number of things. Now I'm so far behind, I'll never die!

  4. #4
    Platinum Member KennyG's Avatar
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    John Deere 2320

    Default Re: Kitchen Flooring

    A lot of this is personal preference. Do you have a really good solid floor to begin with? If not, tile should be ruled out. Do you need a floor that easier on the legs? Then you should look at resilient tile, flooring or wood. I've done several floors recently. I have an engineered bamboo floating floor that was very easy to install and seems very durable. I put down a Congoleum Duraceramic that looks just like tile but installs over a plain plywood sheet. Real tile floors are still the classic, and not that expensive or hard if you don't mind spending a lot of time down on your knees.

    I'm skeptical of the peel and stick stuff over the long term, but that's just my personal bias, not based on experience.

  5. #5
    Platinum Member Craig Clayton's Avatar
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    Uxbridge Ontario Canada
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    L2250 Kubota

    Default Re: Kitchen Flooring

    Well in Kanada we only put down rough chainsaw trimmed wide planking. The reason is wearing snowshoes indoors and the sled dogs at night really tear things up.

    But seriously. I would go with the style of the area you live in. Different floor materials have become popular because of the climate and the local supply.
    Your kitchen can have a certain look, therefore the floor should match.

    If you ever need to sell your home due to a sudden illness, the new buyer has to like the place or that amount will be started to be deducted from the offer.

    I need to run, the dog team is stuck cross ways coming through the front tent flap. I am hoping they will start importing doors soon.

    Craig Clayton

  6. #6
    Veteran Member jmurray01's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kitchen Flooring

    We put those peel and stick things on our kitchen floor in our previous house, and for the two years they were there they were very good and didn't come away or anything.
    "The darkest time is just one hour before dawn" - Johnny Cash.

  7. #7
    Veteran Member General Lee's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kitchen Flooring

    I recently had dura-ceramic installed in my kitchen and dining room. Went with the grout option. It can be laid over vinyl (one layer) if floor is in good condition. Manufacture says its ok to do it. The grout is an acrylic grout and apparently has a bit for flex than standard grout to prevent cracking. The tiles are also fairly flexible to allow installation over minor imperfections in the floor. The dura ceramic is softer and warmer than ceramic tile. You won't know the difference between it and ceramic until someone bends over and touches it.

    The dura ceramic is laid over a glue specifically designed for dura ceramic, then you can have the grout or no grout look. If you can lay ceramic tile, you can do dura ceramic BUT the glue is super tacky. Once you set the tile you really can't pull it up and reset it without ruining it. Based on what I saw having it professionally installed, I wouldn't do it myself unless I did floors for a living.
    Kubota L4400 - Land pride rear scraper blade, 6 foot landscape rake, 72'' Frontier Box Blade, Land Pride 60'' finish mower, Land Pride Q/A pallet forks, County Line Carryall built to haul and loaded R-1's
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  8. #8
    Elite Member WayneB's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kitchen Flooring

    That is a wide open question. We went with a country kitchen look and I selected yellow pine flooring. We selected 6" wide T&G and the board lengths were 12 to 14 feet. The space was completely empty and we installed the floors before putting in the cabinets. Sure made the toe kick spacing a no concern. If you have base cabinets installed you have to consider removing them to put the flooring down if you go with 3/4" boards.

    We like wood flooring in our kitchen, some consider it a problem with spills and such, but we have not had any major problems with that.

    As for tile that was our second choice and we did put that in our summer home. It is nice, but if you drop something (dishes, glasses) go for the broom and dustpan as you will be picking it up. Tile is also pretty cold on the feet so if you live in a cold area you might consider radiant heating beneath the tiles! That's if money is not an object!

    I have never looked at the stick down flooring just not our lifestyle I guess. The bottom line might be if your are doing this for a short term solution or if it is going to be long term living. I prefer wood and recommend that your go with 3/4 thickness. I would not select pre-finished flooring and do the finishing myself with a minimum of 3 coats of oil based poly. Reason for this would be to seal the spaces between the boards.

    Just my thoughts...

    Wayne

  9. #9
    Silver Member Brushhill dave's Avatar
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    kubota 2360,Ford 4610,111jd,gt200 husky

    Default

    Stay away from peel and stick tiles if you live in a climate with varying moisture they don't last. We bought this house 3 years ago and the floor was just done in peel and stick and they're already coming up.

  10. #10
    Elite Member
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    John Deer Lt160

    Default Re: Kitchen Flooring

    We went with the laminate looking tile. You have to silicone around the edge so that water doesnt get under it. We have a small/small kitchen, and we will eventually get new cabinates so I will tile then when everything is ripped out.

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