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  1. #61
    Platinum Member retiredmgn's Avatar
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    Default Re: Boston Butt

    Quote Originally Posted by 2LaneCruzer View Post
    If you have the upright Brinkman with 2 grates and a water pan, you should be able to get a good slab of ribs; just make sure that you can maintain a temperature of about 250 degrees. If you maintain the water pan, it will mitigate the heat so it doesn't get too hot. My concern with the Brinkman I had was keeping the temperature up.

    I take my ribs (baby backs usually) and rub them down with my special rub blend; Cains makes a good rub, and Bad Byron's Butt Rubb is good also, just a tad hot. I first spray them down with some olive oil, and apply a generous amount of rub and them I put them in an oven bag over night. Set them out an hour or so early to let them warm up a bit before putting them on the grill.

    I use a mixture of well seasoned Mesquite wood, Pecan and blackjack oak. I put on enough to make a lot of smoke early, and don't add any more. Mesquite is pretty strong, and it will make your meat bitter if you use too much, as will green wood. I do not soak my wood.

    It's up to you to decide when they are done; usually always less than 3 hours in the egg. Full slabs of spare ribs usually take about 4 hours or less.

    Good luck.
    "the upright Brinkman with 2 grates and a water pan"
    Yup, that's the one. My best guess is too much smoke which causes the bitter taste. And I did soak my wood as the instructions on the package suggested.
    This idea of pre pressure cooking is interesting.
    I've not run into this rub you speak of. Not sure how I would approach that...
    "Excuse me, do you have Bad Byron's Butt Rubb"?
    On one hand someone might consider it a rather personal question of hygiene. Or perhaps they would just lead me down to ointments and suggest, "Bag Balm".
    Probably best if I just quietly peruse the seasoning isle.
    Thanks for the tip.
    Nelson
    Central Maine

  2. #62
    Super Star Member
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    Default Re: Boston Butt

    Quote Originally Posted by 2LaneCruzer View Post
    Come to think of it, there is a certain amount of irony involved in purchasing a chicken that is dressed, wrapped and bearing the label "Smart Chicken"...
    Our chickens are obviously Geniuses....
    1. They are pets good only for eggs.
    2. They cost danged little per pound but cost me a small fortune in feed and house.
    3. The Chicken Geniuses are walked daily around the yard guarded by the wifey and child.
    4. When not out for their guarded daily walk, the Chicken Geniuses, eat, drink, scat, sleep, and squawk.
    5. See 1. I can't eat them since they are pets.

    Who B Smarter? Me or the Genius Chickens.

    Later,
    Dan

  3. #63
    Super Star Member
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    Default Re: Boston Butt

    Quote Originally Posted by retiredmgn View Post
    "the upright Brinkman with 2 grates and a water pan"
    Yup, that's the one. My best guess is too much smoke which causes the bitter taste. And I did soak my wood as the instructions on the package suggested.
    This idea of pre pressure cooking is interesting.
    I've not run into this rub you speak of. Not sure how I would approach that...
    "Excuse me, do you have Bad Byron's Butt Rubb"?
    On one hand someone might consider it a rather personal question of hygiene. Or perhaps they would just lead me down to ointments and suggest, "Bag Balm".
    Probably best if I just quietly peruse the seasoning isle.
    Thanks for the tip.
    Just be careful to not mix up the hemorrhoid cream and the pork seasoning. That could be bad for a couple of reasons depending on which went were.

    When I grill it really is smoking the meat. I use wood chips from splitting wood to get coals and to keep the fire sorta going. I toss in branches that have fallen from the mostly oak trees as well as more wood chip to generate smoke and heat but mostly smoke. I don't use the water bath though my grill has one. I just make a very small fire and keep that small fire going for cooking. Our kids are very picky eaters and will only eat the loin or ribs smoked on the grill. If the meat was bitter they would not eat it. Loin is faster to cook than ribs. Frankly, I look at the cost of ribs and move on to loin. Ribs are expensive for the amount of meat.

    It does amazes me a bit how much experience it takes to get the fire just right to cook. Not too hot, but at the right temperature, producing smoke, but not killing the fire. Interesting balancing act that seems to work best with beer.

    Later,
    Dan

  4. #64
    Elite Member Car Doc's Avatar
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    Default Re: Boston Butt

    Quote Originally Posted by sdkubota View Post
    I knew I would be chastized and if you would rather cook for 6 hours instead of 1 be my guest. I will gaurantee my ribs would win any contest though. Turns out pressure cooking is fantastic at breaking down tough meat. Try my method then criticize.
    We are just funnin ya! fyi It is not allowed to par boil or pre-cook any meat in any contest I am aware of. Not saying the results are any less spectacular just not allowed so hey do what you you like to do its the results that are important right!

    fwtw I cook (and so do most BBQ contest cooks I know of) 2.75-3.25# slabs of St Louis cut ribs @ 250-275 for 2.5 hours then wrap them in foil (this is what we do to tenderize ours) for 1 hour with butter and brown sugar and a pinch of cinnamon in the foil and then pull them out of the foil and glaze them and put back on smoker for 15 minutes. And we have won quite a few rib awards in KCBS contests and backyard contests also fwtw.
    Yanmar YM3810D, LT duty 3pt hoe, 6' KK2 tiller, 6' KK box blade, 6 1/2' KK disc, 5' Howse bush hog, 5' Howse back blade, 9" Yellow PHD, 3 Husky chain saws 346XP NE, 359, 372XP. 07 HD Heritage Softail, Crack injectors, check compression, take 2 beers and call me. "Hey you didn't build that."

  5. #65
    Super Star Member 2LaneCruzer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Boston Butt

    Quote Originally Posted by retiredmgn View Post
    "the upright Brinkman with 2 grates and a water pan"
    Yup, that's the one. My best guess is too much smoke which causes the bitter taste. And I did soak my wood as the instructions on the package suggested.
    This idea of pre pressure cooking is interesting.
    I've not run into this rub you speak of. Not sure how I would approach that...
    "Excuse me, do you have Bad Byron's Butt Rubb"?
    On one hand someone might consider it a rather personal question of hygiene. Or perhaps they would just lead me down to ointments and suggest, "Bag Balm".
    Probably best if I just quietly peruse the seasoning isle.
    Thanks for the tip.
    Bad Byron's Butt Rubb:

    bad byron's butt rub - Google Search

    The Cain's BBQ spice is good also, but not sure it's available in your area.


    My recipe for dry rib rub:

    D.G.'s #1 Rib Rub

    1 Cup Paprika
    2/3 Cup Black pepper ( mix of regular and coarse ground)
    1/2 Cup Granulated Garlic
    3 TBSP Salt (fine sea salt; no Iodine added)
    3 TBSP Granulated Onion
    3 TBSP Chipotle Powder


    D.G.'s #2 Rib Rub

    1 Cup Paprika
    2/3 Cup Black Pepper (mix of regular and coarse ground)
    1/2 Cup Granulated Garlic
    1/3 Cup Brown Sugar (light)
    1/3 Cup white Sugar
    1/3 Cup Ginger
    3 TBSP Salt (fine sea salt; no Iodine added)
    3 TBSP Granulated Onion
    3 TBSP Chipotle Powder
    1 TBSP Lemon Pepper

    The #1 is as close to Bad Byron's Butt Rubb as I could get; very good, but a tad hot for most folks. The #2 is better than any I have been able to buy; not too hot, not too sweet.
    Have Wings, Will Travel.

  6. #66
    Super Star Member brin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Boston Butt

    I started out grilling and burning ribs back in the 70's...then I learned to cook them off the open flame...I tried par boiling them and it did make grill time shorter...for sure...but in my humble opinion it boiled out most of the fat that bastes the ribs on the grill as it cooks and as a result it boiled out the taste...So , I began to grill my ribs just as Car Doc has described in his post above...I use hickory or oak chips on my gas grill for 2 to 3 hrs. then wrap them in foil with some apple cider vinegar mixed with my local grocery store brand BBQ sauce and they come out falling off the bone good....But however you make your ribs they are great as long as you don't burn them like I used to ...LOL
    Bob

    WORRYING does not take away tomorrow's TROUBLES, it takes away today's PEACE.


    NH - TC-29 , FEL, Bush hog, Bush hog brand finishing mower, Post hole digger, 6' Back blade, sub-soiler, Pallet forks, 20KW PTO Generator , 21 hp Murray Mower
    JD -3020 with FEL and a 16 HP. K-Grow Lawn Tractor (bought from K Mart 1994) and runs great !
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  7. #67
    Elite Member Car Doc's Avatar
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    Default Re: Boston Butt

    Since we are sharing recipes etc fwtw my rub of choice is Smokin Guns hot rub and my favorite BBQ sauce is a mix of 1/2 Blues Hog and 1/2 Curly's Hickory BBQ sauces. I use several of ObieQues rubs too from Texas especially as a layered rub when doing briskets along with the Guns rub.

    My pork spritz is 1- 12 oz can of pineapple juice,1/2 bottle each of garlic juice and onion juice, a heaping tbsp of MSG (Accent) and 1/4 bottle of tabasco and a half bottle of pure maple syrup. I also use Hickory pellets in my smoker is a modified 125 Traeger.
    Yanmar YM3810D, LT duty 3pt hoe, 6' KK2 tiller, 6' KK box blade, 6 1/2' KK disc, 5' Howse bush hog, 5' Howse back blade, 9" Yellow PHD, 3 Husky chain saws 346XP NE, 359, 372XP. 07 HD Heritage Softail, Crack injectors, check compression, take 2 beers and call me. "Hey you didn't build that."

  8. #68
    Elite Member Car Doc's Avatar
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    Default Re: Boston Butt

    Quote Originally Posted by 2LaneCruzer View Post
    The difference in taste is quite apparent; and they cook up on the smoker exceptionally well. Briskit...well...that's another story. I have had outstanding successes and dismal failures with briskit. At $30 a pop, I don't like failure.
    Yeah $30 sounds like a lot to some folks briskets are quite expensive true. We normally pay about $5-6 a pound for plain old CAB briskets (certified black angus briskets) in USDA choice. And most guys use packers which are un-trimmed and weigh between 16 and 18 lbs we normally wet age them for about 50 days also before a contest. fwtw

    fwtw If a person can swing the money Japanese wagu (sp?) and USDA prime briskets will run a whole lot more than that a whole lot more and are worth every penny so long as you get them cooked right.

    edit: this is why I always go thru the cases of big cuts at sams and the meat stores etc so I can pick my own cuts. quite often a prime brisket will get thru and some choice cuts are indistinguishable from prime its the feel of the cut the "flex" and mainly the fat striations and overall thickness for slicing properly you look for to compare cuts and no knife cuts anywhere on them to mess you up at turn in time. fwtw
    Yanmar YM3810D, LT duty 3pt hoe, 6' KK2 tiller, 6' KK box blade, 6 1/2' KK disc, 5' Howse bush hog, 5' Howse back blade, 9" Yellow PHD, 3 Husky chain saws 346XP NE, 359, 372XP. 07 HD Heritage Softail, Crack injectors, check compression, take 2 beers and call me. "Hey you didn't build that."

  9. #69
    Super Star Member
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    Default Re: Boston Butt

    Quote Originally Posted by Car Doc View Post
    ...

    fwtw If a person can swing the money Japanese wagu (sp?) and USDA prime briskets will run a whole lot more than that a whole lot more and are worth every penny so long as you get them cooked right.
    ...
    On vacation awhile back, I had a couple of sushi sized pieces of Wagyu beef. I don't know if it was from Japan or raise in the US though but it was sure GREAT eating. Expensive but GREAT. Just about melted in your mouth and it was all but raw.

    A year or so ago, a local rancher was selling beef out of her trailer. Yeah, yeah, I know but she was legit and was selling at the various farmers markets. She had a steak that was thick and very marbled. It was the best looking steak I had ever seen. I forgot how much it cost but it was worth every danged penny. I smoked/grilled it and it was Yum Yum Yummy! I can't decide if the Wagyu or this steak was better. It would take a taste test. I do know which one I can easily and more cheaply buy.

    The rancher told me a story about a lady that bought some hamburger from her. The lady had family in town, including grandkids, and she wanted to make hamburgers. The lady wanted grass fed, no hormone, yada yada, beef so she bought some from the lady rancher. Now the women was vegetarian and had not eaten meat in decades but the rest of the family did not share her dietary exile. The lady would always cook herself a veggie burger while her husband would eat meat. As the lady was cooking up the hamburgers, she said the smell was so good that it was driving her to eat meat. The lady took the hamburgers as they were done to the dining room for her family and then she sat down with her own red meat hamburger. Her family was in shock and could not believe that she was eating meet. The lady said the hamburgers just smelled too good and she had to have one.

    The rancher said the lady showed up the next week to buy more hamburger from her and had been buying ever since.

    I thought that was a danged funny story but I was not really buying it until I at the rancher's steak. Then I was a believ'n.

    Later,
    Dan NowIAmHungryAgain.

  10. #70
    Super Star Member 2LaneCruzer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Boston Butt

    This is what I like about BBQ folks; we can all have different opinions, different tastes and still be friends...we don't change each other's minds by cogent and clever arguments, but by exchanging recipes and cooking for our friends. It doesn't get much better than this!!!!!
    Have Wings, Will Travel.

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