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  1. #1
    Elite Member Richard's Avatar
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    Default How to "store" logs prior to cutting

    Had a couple downed oaks this past winter. I cut most of them up and quite honestly, we have more firewood laying around than we might use over course of 2 years (given past usage patterns).

    I dragged about 5 more oak trees to a clear spot up on hill, behind house and they are just laying on ground. I figure, they are easier to carry as logs, so I'll leave them there for a year and THEN cut them.

    So, I have about 5 oak trees laying on ground like "pick up stix". Is that ok for them (I'd expect them to rot), or since I also have a couple 15/20 foot logs of cedar, should I put THEM on ground, and lay the oaks across them to get them off ground and allow air to circulate throughout them?


    While I"m at it... is there any qualatative difference between cutting a standing dead oak tree for firewood, as compared to cutting a live one and letting it dry out for a year?

    Richard


  2. #2
    Veteran Member
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    Cambridge, New York
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    JD425 lawn tractor; JD4710 CUT; JD JX75 Walk Behind

    Default Re: How to "store" logs prior to cutting

    Richard...

    <font color="blue">I have about 5 oak trees laying on ground like "pick up stix". Is that ok for them (I'd expect them to rot), or since I also have a couple 15/20 foot logs of cedar, should I put THEM on ground, and lay the oaks across them to get them off ground and allow air to circulate throughout them? </font>

    Yes and Yes to your questions. We cut 6-7 cords of firewood from our hedgerows and woodlots each year. If I have too many logs that I can't use in any given season, I'll stack them uncut. Eventually, they will rot. But, they will rot even quicker if you cut them up into rounds and then let them sit. Cut rounds will last 2-3 years before they start to get punky. Logs may last 3-5 years (depends upon tree species) before the same starts to happen to them. If you can stack them, that should even be better.

    <font color="blue"> While I'm at it... is there any qualitative difference between cutting a standing dead oak tree for firewood, as compared to cutting a live one and letting it dry out for a year? </font>

    The standing dead oak is already seasoned. As long as it hasn't started to rot and become brittle with age, you can cut it, burn it immediately, and it should provide the same Btu generation as a seasoned oak. Seasoned oak though takes time to season (at least a good year). I would likely start with that dead oak if I was looking for some ready to burn firewood at the start of the burning season.

    ...Bob

  3. #3
    Elite Member Richard's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to "store" logs prior to cutting

    ty for your replies. On the standing dead oak question, you answered what I suspected to be the case... I guess I HAVE learned some stuff hanging around this place [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] Dont tell the wifey though, I'll let her think I just know it all. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif[/img]

  4. #4

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    Default Re: How to "store" logs prior to cutting

    Richard,
    Have you ever though of turning your logs into useable lumber?
    I mill some with my Alaskan chainsaw mill. There are also a lot of folks around that have mobile saw mills that do custom cutting.

  5. #5
    Bronze Member tbutman's Avatar
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    JD 1050, JD 1070 4wd, 1947 farmall cub, 332 JD diesel lawn tractor, JD 314 lawn tractor, MAX2 6-Wheeler (amphibious) Brand new Turner firewood processor, conveyor

    Default Re: How to \"store\" logs prior to cutting

    So, I have about 5 oak trees laying on ground like "pick up stix". Is that ok for them (I'd expect them to rot), or since I also have a couple 15/20 foot logs of cedar, should I put THEM on ground, and lay the oaks across them to get them off ground and allow air to circulate throughout them?


    I'd definetly lay down 2 or 3 skids to store your logs onto. The cedar will work or even some smaller stuff that has less value like small hemlock or poplar (aspen). If you need a reason to do this the added air circulation is a good one or the fact when it comes time to saw it it's a little higher off the ground. less chance for dulling your saw chain.

  6. #6
    Veteran Member
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    Default Re: How to "store" logs prior to cutting

    I would use the cedar to set the oak on -- sitting on the ground the logs will rot -- and I do not think it will take long. If they get wet and cannot dry , logs can rot in less than a year -- JMHI

  7. #7
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    Default Re: How to "store" logs prior to cutting

    My vote is to stack off the ground. Air circulation is always good, also keeping the weeds down so the wind can blow thru it helps during the summer. Standing dead can be burned but watch out for the last 6-8' of trunk. Trees will still wick moisture even thoe they are dead. The trunk would still need to be split and allowded to season before burning. I heat with wood and cut mostly dead Elm so I have a little experience with dead trees.

    Just my 2 cents take it for what its worth.

    Beefie

  8. #8
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    Default Re: How to \"store\" logs prior to cutting

    Quote Originally Posted by Oregon_Rob View Post
    Richard,
    Have you ever though of turning your logs into useable lumber?
    I mill some with my Alaskan chainsaw mill. There are also a lot of folks around that have mobile saw mills that do custom cutting.
    I don't know what they charge in your area, but in my area here in NC, people with mobile saw mills that do custom cutting advertise these prices. Fifty cents-$.50-board foot or $60.00 hourly rate. Just a thought.
    The PUPIL who does not surpass his Master, fails his Master.

  9. #9
    Elite Member
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    kioti ck30

    Default Re: How to "store" logs prior to cutting

    my experience with standing dead oak is that if the bark is on it is not seasoned and will be full of water. Better cut them down asap and split, bark is water proof so if the logs will rot until split to let the water evaporate . I agree that they should be off the ground that will help some. Only wood that has the water removed will not rot and the only way to do that is to either remove the bark or split.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: How to "store" logs prior to cutting

    ty for your replies. On the standing dead oak question, you answered what I suspected to be the case

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