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  1. #41
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,771
    Location
    Doniphan, Mo.
    Tractor
    Kubota L4240, B7800 & BX2660

    Default Re: BISQUITES & GRAVY -- COOKING

    After reading all the good biscuits and gravy stuff, I had to make some for supper. My gravy didn't turn out to good. I lost the know how, but you just wait until next time i'll get it right. This might also go with the biscuits and make you show your teeth from the smile on your face.

    Turkey Recipe

    8 - 15 lb. turkey
    1 cup melted butter
    1 cup stuffing (Pepperidge Farm is Good)
    1 cup un-popped popcorn (ORVILLE REDENBACHER'S LOW FAT IS BEST)
    Salt/pepper to taste

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Brush turkey well with melted butter, salt,
    and pepper.
    Fill cavity with stuffing and popcorn. Place in baking pan making sure the
    neck end is toward the front of the oven, not the back.

    After about 4 hours listen for the popping sounds.

    When the turkey's butt blows the oven door open and the bird flies across
    the room,.... it's done.

  2. #42
    Super Star Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    14,431
    Location
    Yanceyville, North Carolina
    Tractor
    Kubota L4400

    Default Re: BISQUITES & GRAVY -- COOKING

    Quote Originally Posted by dave1949 View Post
    I have a couple of the newer Lodge cast iron skillets. They are "pre-seasoned". As near as I can tell, the skillet cooking surface is left with an un-ground cast surface, very fine bumps. Then they season it with soybean oil in an oven. My old cast iron skillets that were my Dad's have the cooking surface ground flat. There is just no comparison between the new and old for non-stick cooking, the new is 20 times better and a lot easier to keep seasoned as long as you follow the directions and keep the soap away from it.
    I have never used the "Pre-seasoned type". If you purchase a regular piece of Lodge Cast iron cookware, and season it it the oven on 350 degrees, with several applications of Crisco or bacon grease, you will be surprised. I have seasoned many a regular piece for others. Just a thought.
    The PUPIL who does not surpass his Master, fails his Master.

  3. #43
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    36,984
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: BISQUITES & GRAVY -- COOKING

    I'm not sure that "pre-seasoned" business means much. Quite some time ago, I bought two of the Lodge Divided Rectangular Mini Servers. Now admittedly, I bought them for a different use than what Lodge says they're for. The two of them lets me bake 6 pieces of cornbread in a shape and size that I really like. But I had a terrible time with my cornbread sticking. I tried using a cooking spray, olive oil, re-seasoned them according to instructions I found on the Internet. Anyway, I FINALLY solved the problem. When I make cornbread, I first put a little bit of real lard in each division, pre-heat and melt the lard in the oven before putting the cornbread batter in them, and afterwards, I just wipe them clean with paper towels.
    Bird

  4. #44
    R.I.P.
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    5,883
    Location
    North Carolina
    Tractor
    Kubota BX2200

    Default Re: BISQUITES & GRAVY -- COOKING

    Quote Originally Posted by Bird View Post
    I'm not sure that "pre-seasoned" business means much. Quite some time ago, I bought two of the Lodge Divided Rectangular Mini Servers. Now admittedly, I bought them for a different use than what Lodge says they're for. The two of them lets me bake 6 pieces of cornbread in a shape and size that I really like. But I had a terrible time with my cornbread sticking. I tried using a cooking spray, olive oil, re-seasoned them according to instructions I found on the Internet. Anyway, I FINALLY solved the problem. When I make cornbread, I first put a little bit of real lard in each division, pre-heat and melt the lard in the oven before putting the cornbread batter in them, and afterwards, I just wipe them clean with paper towels.
    My cornbread cake barely drops out of my medium Lodge pan under its own weight, so I can see who the divider might make it less likely to do so. If I ever have any issues, I will try to remember the lard trick.
    Which is bigger?: a) $100 per month since the Big Bang or b) the US National Debt.

  5. #45
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    4,607
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Tractor
    New Holland TC-45

    Default Re: BISQUITES & GRAVY -- COOKING

    Now I know why biscuits are sometimes called "Sinkers".

    Got 1/2 my propane problems solved. Now is time to make some biscuits.

    Grated frozen "Fake" butter into mix. A little extra baking powder, all stirred together. Add recommended amount of milk , not enough still a little dry, add more. Still a little dry, maybe that the way they spose to be. ??? Even broke out the rolling pin.

    They cooked up nice & fluffy (for biscuits). Tasted good. Ate 1 with butter soon as taken from oven. A little crumbly ( should have added a little corn starch & an egg.) in the batter.

    Had another with butter & honey. Good taste.

    Though I would lay down for a little while. Gone for 4 hours, wild crazy dreams. My new sleeping pills. BISQUITES & GRAVY -- COOKING-cartoon020.png

    Tomorrow, time to louse up some gravy. Name:  fun.png
Views: 143
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    ::"I STARTED out with nothing....I still have most of it."

    New Holland TC45 1,300+ hours - FEL - back hoe - post hole digger - Hydraulic Gannon - cement mixer - pressure washer - 1975 Dodge 500 flat bed - 1974 chevy C65 6 yard dump truck.
    All home made by me. loading forks - 2 drags - roller - Sheep's Foot - Pusher (to unload flat bed truck.) - pickle fork digger - Log splitter -

  6. #46
    Super Member dave1949's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    9,016
    Location
    Industry, Maine
    Tractor
    New Holland TC40

    Default Re: BISQUITES & GRAVY -- COOKING

    Quote Originally Posted by creekbend View Post
    I have never used the "Pre-seasoned type". If you purchase a regular piece of Lodge Cast iron cookware, and season it it the oven on 350 degrees, with several applications of Crisco or bacon grease, you will be surprised. I have seasoned many a regular piece for others. Just a thought.
    I have seasoned the old style as you describe. I think the main difference is in the texture of the cooking surface for the new type. You still have to keep the surface seasoned a bit.

    I cleaned up some very old and well used Wagner cast iron skillets. They had a hard shell "seasoning" layer on them, then rusty gunk underneath that. It didn't look too appetizing

    I assume these skillets were used day-in day-out for many years. I actually tossed one in a fire to get it clean, the seasoning layer was so hard. I don't know, not much experience, but my guess is that on a well seasoned skillet, the food never touches cast iron.
    "Those were the days my friend, we thought they'd never end ..."

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