Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 76
  1. #11
    Elite Member TomSeller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    3,685
    Location
    timbuktu
    Tractor
    Many

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by General Lee View Post

    No tomatoes or soap have been in the skillet. I have noticed an improvement when I cook at lower temps, so you are right on with that tip. I think a big problem is the "Lodge" brand. The bottom of the skillet (inside) is kinda rough and it takes more seasoning to fill the voids. I read of the issue in other reviews.

    Oh, mainly I'm cooking meats and breakfast foods in the skillet. Eggs, bacon, sausage, chicken , pork etc. Eggs are the toughest
    Eggs slide off mine like you wouldn't believe. The Griswold is smooth, smooth. I never have used Lodge. Pork and chicken do stick a little the way I use mine. But like I said, I take mine down to smooth metal every time. Some people let a little buildup occur, I don't. I never cook past half way on the temp setting on my induction cooktop.

  2. #12
    Veteran Member wedge40's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,150

    Default Re: Seasoning a cast iron skillet....Tips please

    Getting cast iron to an "almost" non-stick state can take some time and patients. If the bottom and sides still have that rough look it's not seasoned enough. I use high heat oil in mine (peanut, canola etc) placed in a 300* oven for at least 30 minutes. Let it cool, take it out, wipe it down and repeat a couple of times. When doing eggs I still use some non-stick spray. I never fry bacon, I always bake my bacon.
    After each use of the pan I clean it with hot water, place back on the stove on a high heat burner and wait till it just starts to smoke again, then turn the heat off. They get touched up with oil every now and again when I see spots that are getting bare. If there are things stuck to the pan use plastic or something non metal to scrape it off. I treat cast iron like teflon and try not to use to may steel utensils with it.

    Is this the correct way to deal with cast iron cook ware. I dont know, but it seems to work for me.

    Wedge
    1967 Ford 4000, Box blade, straight blade, FEL, Rake, Bushhog, Backhoe, Jinma chipper, KKII tiller, Grapple.

  3. #13
    Elite Member schmism's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    4,919
    Location
    Peoria IL
    Tractor
    New holland TC(33)

    Default Re: Seasoning a cast iron skillet....Tips please

    I belive lodge brand are rough sand cast and not finished. The older castiron was ground to a finish on the inside to leave it much smoother.

    Lodge can be significantly improved if you take a flap disk sanding wheel (4.5" grinder) to it and smooth out all those sand cast bumps.

    Then season well in the oven.

    Ive heard you can really bake in a lot of grease if you deep fry chicken in them the way gran used to.
    Steve - TC33D 4x4 FEL, dual rear remotes with toys

  4. #14
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    1,039
    Location
    Kentucky
    Tractor
    B2920

    Default Re: Seasoning a cast iron skillet....Tips please

    I've still got one of the old high sided chicken fryers that belonged to my Mom and it does one heck of a job frying chicken, that's the only thing I allow to be cooked in it. I treat that thing like it was made of gold!

    I've also got 3 wagners and 2 griswolds that get used pretty regularly, no soap to clean, warm water, salt and a paper towel is all the need, but I re-season them every spring.
    You'll find that there are many different opinions on how to season cast iron, but this one has always worked for me:

    I had an old mess Sergeant tell me that when he seasoned his cast iron grills in the Army, he always used lard. He'd heat the grill up and smear on a good coating of lard, liberally sprinkle salt over it, then start rubbing the salt and lard into the cast iron with a grill stone, or cleaning block. He swore that there was something about the salt that helped push the lard into the cast iron. Then when it cooled down, rinse with water and heat until dry. That old fellow has made me a million egg sandwiches out in the field on his cast grills and I never saw an egg even think about sticking!

    I do the seasoning outside in the spring on my gas fish cooker unit. I always wear welding gloves because working that grill stone around, it's easy to get burned, but an hour or so of work once a year does the job.

  5. #15
    Elite Member Baby Grand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    3,560
    Location
    Windsor, CT.
    Tractor
    L3240GST, B2320HST, B5100D & G5200H

    Default Re: Seasoning a cast iron skillet....Tips please

    The Plant Manager has amassed an impressive collection of pans & skillets from eBay, Goodwill, tag sales, etc. Schism is right about the surface finish on the Lodge brand - they appear to be as-cast from a sand casting process, whereas the Griswold and Wagners are mostly machined or ground to a fine finish. I have been very disapointed with the Lodge cast performance and will try the flap wheel on them to see if i can bring them up a notch.

    I use mostly lard collected from baking bacon on a wire grill on top of a low sided sheet in the oven. This provides a much better release than butter and won't burn until a higher temperature.

    I'm really interested in trying the salt in the lard, like Gunny mentions. Now I need to research that grill stone some as I've never used one.

    Another thing to consider is the spatula you use. We have an old Ecko that's got a thick, springy blade with gently rounded corners and edges that doesn't scrape the seasoned cast iron, even if you use it briskly.
    That's the problem with trouble.
    It always starts out as such fun."
    - Randall Brown

  6. #16
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    172
    Location
    DC currently, soon Upper Hudson River Valley where our acreage is located.
    Tractor
    Still looking

    Default Re: Seasoning a cast iron skillet....Tips please

    I use a lodge for eggs all the time with no problem (and a little butter as well). We just season it by putting on a little over medium heat and wipe a bit of canola oil on it until it smokes a bit. repeat this a bunch of times. I will usually do this a few times when prepping the ingredients I am cooking such as asian style stir frys, fried rice, or letting a steak rest a bit prior to pan searing it. If something gets stuck even after rinseing and a light scrub with a brush (like potatoes as mentioned) I simply return it to the heat and add some oil and kosher salt and use the salt to sand away the stuck bits of food with a wadded paper towel pushed around with a wooden paddle. This seems to clean the non-stick surface that has built up without removing it.

    Up at our country place all the cast iron is over 100 years old (a mix of Griswold and no name pans) and doesn't need anything to improve the non-stick performance. I've considered sanding the Lodge pans smooth. I have a larger pan that the non-stick surface got damaged (spouses training has not been completed) which I haven't gotten around to renewing and I will likely try smoothing that one out prior to seasoning.

  7. #17
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    2,917
    Location
    Virginia
    Tractor
    1949 farmall, 1961 Fordson Dexta, 1986 Duetz Allis, 2001 Kubota.

    Default Re: Seasoning a cast iron skillet....Tips please

    Go to a old yard sale, old auction and buy some from estates. All ready well seasoned and pennies on the dollar. Great weapons until their outlawed.

    mark
    red tractor
    blue tractor
    green tractor
    orange tractor
    too many impliments to list

  8. #18
    Super Star Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    10,054
    Location
    Triangle Of North Carolina
    Tractor
    JD 4700

    Default Re: Seasoning a cast iron skillet....Tips please

    When I use our cast iron, I clean it up usually with just a paper towel, but water if needed. Usually the oven or stove is still hot so I will throw a bit of Canola oil on the cast iron and put it back on the stove top or in the oven to heat back up. This works for me. I cook eggs in a stainless steel skillet not cast iron. If I use plenty of butter, the eggs don't stick at all.

    I just bought some Lodge cast iron bread pans and the bread stuck in a few places even though the pans were pre seasoned and I did my own seasoning. It is going to be a PITA to clean up those pans so I might try the hot oil trick and see what happens. The pans will work fine once they are seasoned enough.

    Later,
    Dan

  9. #19
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,307
    Location
    Myrtle Creek, Oregon
    Tractor
    Kubota l3130

    Default Re: Seasoning a cast iron skillet....Tips please

    Quote Originally Posted by schmism View Post
    I belive lodge brand are rough sand cast and not finished. The older castiron was ground to a finish on the inside to leave it much smoother.

    Lodge can be significantly improved if you take a flap disk sanding wheel (4.5" grinder) to it and smooth out all those sand cast bumps.

    Then season well in the oven.

    Ive heard you can really bake in a lot of grease if you deep fry chicken in them the way gran used to.
    Exactly. Quality cast iron is smooth as glass, even before it is seasoned. Once it is seasoned, it is as close to perfect cookware as it's possible to get. Sand cast cookware can be brought up to quality, but it's a lot of work. Use corundum sandpaper, a small pad sander, and be prepared to work on it for hours. It may take several days on and off to buff it down to a smooth condition.

    The best way I have found to season cast iron is to make popcorn in it.

  10. #20
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,965
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Tractor
    Bobcat CT225

    Default Re: Seasoning a cast iron skillet....Tips please

    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
    Use corundum sandpaper, a small pad sander, and be prepared to work on it for hours. It may take several days on and off to buff it down to a smooth condition.
    This may be dumb, but why not a flap wheel on an angle grinder?

Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Cast Iron
    By MasseyWV in forum Parts/Repairs
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 02-12-2012, 09:14 PM
  2. Cast iron
    By jcottons in forum Welding
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-22-2011, 02:36 PM
  3. Welding Cast Iron
    By dliston in forum Welding
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 08-11-2005, 04:28 PM
  4. WELDING CAST IRON
    By buster in forum Parts/Repairs
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 03-09-2005, 06:44 AM
  5. cast alum vs cast iron
    By fluffyone in forum Kubota Owning/Operating
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 02-11-2004, 07:55 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2014 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.