Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    649
    Location
    West Virginia

    Default Identifying Hard Maple/Soft Maple on the stump.

    What is the difference in appearance of a Hard maple versus Soft maple tree on the stump. I was told to scratch the bark off of the tree and if it was red colored underneath the bark it was a soft maple. Do you agree ?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    77
    Location
    Underhill Vermont
    Tractor
    Kubota L3010HST

    Default Re: Identifying Hard Maple/Soft Maple on the stump.

    Hi Col. Jackson,

    Not sure I understand, but if you're trying to identify a stump, I can't help much.

    If you're trying to identify a standing tree, I can help a bit. I've got 3 or 4 general rules for separating Sugar Maples from their local cousins (red, silver, swamp, striped; collectively known as "soft" maples here).

    Perhaps you can describe what you're trying to do, and I can focus a better answer.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    649
    Location
    West Virginia

    Default Re: Identifying Hard Maple/Soft Maple on the stump.

    Sorry about the confusion,I just need a good way to distinguish the difference between the 2 different types of trees prior to cutting one down.

    Thanks

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    77
    Location
    Underhill Vermont
    Tractor
    Kubota L3010HST

    Default Re: Identifying Hard Maple/Soft Maple on the stump.

    Ah, got it. If you can still get a leaf from each tree, that is the best way. A sugar maple leaf will have U-shaped valleys (sinuses) between the 5 points ("lobes"), kind of like the valleys between your fingers. A red maple leaf will have V-shaped sinuses.

    If you can't get a leaf, there are some other general rules:
    1) Buds: red maple buds are red and obviously large on the end of the twigs this time of year. Sugar maple buds are tiny right now and won't swell till the late spring.
    2) Twigs: look up through the crown of the tree. The smallest twigs on a red maple will have a gently curving and branching pattern. The sugar maple twigs will be much more angular, kind of like a witch's fingers.
    3) Clusters: red maples grow in clusters of multiple trunks from a single base much more often than do sugar maples.
    4) Bulls-eyes: red maples over about 12" in diameter often develop a patches of bark that look circular with radial cracks. These patches may be 8-12" in diameter. Sugar maples don't have them.

    Also, give this web site a try.

    Good luck!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2014 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.