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  1. #21
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    369
    Location
    In the middle of the palm of your right hand...wait, that doesn\'t sound good...
    Tractor
    4010 JD Cut, 4020 JD, shovels, rakes, and implements of destruction

    Default Re: wood stoves

    Not only does it matter to the insurance companies, but if your house burns down and it is traced back to the pellet stove your insurance might not pay if you haven't informed them of the stove.
    Most likely your insurance company will want the installation signed off by a licensed furnace installer before they will insure it.

    Good Luck. Been there. Your turn.

    "Permits?? I don't need no stinking permits!!"

  2. #22
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    576
    Location
    NC
    Tractor
    NH TC35D4

    Default Re: wood stoves

    I've had a VC stove in the basement for a few years and now have a Waterstove 200' from the house.
    No smoke, no wood in the house, no mess to clean up, no ashes to clean out, and can heat the whole house.

    Ok, a little more $$ up front, but consider the ++'s.

    OBTW. make sure your chimney is sized/speced for the stove. I will NEVER have another chimney system without a Stainless Steel lining flu.

    gary

  3. #23
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    1,436
    Location
    Byron New York
    Tractor
    2004 BX2230

    Default Re: wood stoves

    Is this really the case. Does everyone with a stove have it covered with a homeowners waiver or something.

  4. #24
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    134
    Location
    Central Arkansas

    Default Re: wood stoves

    My insurer requires an annual inspection/cleaning by a sweep on their list of approved contractors, no extra cost to the policy itself. You'll definitely want to declare the stove and find out what specific requirements or writers they might need.

    I'll gladly pay once a year to let someone else climb 10' over an already 30' tall roof to clean it out from the top, then I just clean it out the best I can from the bottom every month thereafter.

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    49
    Location
    Lynchburg, VA
    Tractor
    Kubota L4300 DX

    Default Re: wood stoves

    I think there is a big swing on what insurance companies require as far as woodstoves. When I bought my house 6 years ago, I had to change insurance companies as the one I had would not insure woodstoves period.

    The company I went with didn't even blink when I told them I had a homemade woodstove. They covered me for 6 months before the guy came out and looked at it. BTW I have since bought a Lopi Liberty to replace the homemade job and I now burn half the wood. These new stoves are really a lot better.

  6. #26
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    5,666
    Location
    Cedartown, Ga and N. Ga mountains
    Tractor
    1998 Kubota B21, 2005 Kubota L39

    Default Re: wood stoves

    We are about to change from an insert, Buck Stoves, to a free standing stove as part of a remodel. The Jotul Firelight, catalytic converter and about $2500 six years ago, we use at another house has just been great so I figured I would go that way again. Now you guys have reminded me that I have read some good things about the soapstone stoves and wonder if I should do some more looking.

    Anyone care to comment on their soap stone stove, brand, model and price range?

    MarkV

  7. #27
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    306
    Location
    Grayson County TX
    Tractor
    Kioti DK35

    Default Re: wood stoves

    I'm curious, how long does the typical catalytic converter on these stoves last? 100,000 logs? [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

  8. #28
    Super Member 5030's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    5,145
    Location
    Michigan, S.E. Monroe County
    Tractor
    Kubota M9000 Hyd Kubota M105 shuttle

    Default Re: wood stoves

    .......ten years or 100,000 logs, whichever comes first. Providing the original owner services the vehicle (woodstove) in accordance with the manufacturers approved schedule and only uses original equipment logs............. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

  9. #29
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    17,729
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada

    Default Re: wood stoves

    Wonder if the warranty includes original owner body. Just finished slitting and stacking a 3/4 ton pickup of wood.

    Egon

  10. #30
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    644
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Tractor
    Kubota B2410 Bi-Speed Turn, R4's, Top 'N' Tilt, LA 352 Loader w/ Toothbar

    Default Re: wood stoves

    I have a Hearthstone Soapstone stove. I like the stove but it is trickier to run than some others I have used. This has nothing to do with the soapstone and everything to do with the design. As far as the soapstone, it does as advertised, it's a little slow to start throwing heat when first started as the stones take a lot of energy to get hot. Once hot, they do stay warm a long time. Overall I do like it. I will say my Hearthstone hates to be "raced." It likes a nice slow even burn. If you overload it, it will burn too quickly and run the flame up the chimney. I've owned others you can load right to the top with no problems. I believe it has to do with the chamber design. The other feature is how it feeds air. On the back there is a "flapper" over a hole maybe two inches in diameter. The flapper is on a wire connected to a control handle at the top. As the stove gets hotter, the metal wire expands from the heat, gradually closing the flapper over the air source to help slow the fire. The problem is that in order to not allow too much air when starting the stove, you need to keep it open only a little. Then once it gets going, the flapper wire expands and the flapper closes off the vent hole, choking the fire. It requires pretty regular adjusting as you go. I'm thinking of changing the wire to a thicker one that may have less variation.

    My stove has no catalyst. I miss my stoves that had one. I like the way they run. I've found that in order to run one right, you need a thermometer on the top of the stove. At 500 degrees, close off the damper and let the catalyst burn the smoke. I have found it works really well.

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