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  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    1,310
    Location
    Michigan
    Tractor
    Kubota L3650/AC B210

    Default Horse Help

    Okay guys,

    I need advice on ponies that don't come under the hood, and I know we've got a lot of horse people here. I'm sure there is a proper way to proceed and I want to be considered polite, so I need you guys to give me some advice.

    My furnace contractor was out at the new house yesterday and called me last night with some news. He said:

    "We were eating lunch and we heard an awful noise outside. I looked out and that horse across the street was charging straight toward the house! So, I shut the door because I thought it was coming right in with us. Then, I heard the horse screaming and your neighbor screaming and I didn't know what to do."

    To make a long story short, my neighbor was cleaning her barn and tied her horse to the swingset while she shoveled the stuff. Something spooked the horse and it took off with the swing set. It lost the swings when it jumped the fence, came down my circle drive and headed back toward the road. Unfortunately, it fell at the ditch and broke its leg (real bad) and they had to put it down.

    We enjoyed watching this horse when it was pastured across the street and we're going to miss it. It was a part of moving to the farm we really looked forward to. We called the neighbor last night, asked what happened, and expressed our sympathy.

    My question. Is there anything else I should do or be aware of? I know this sounds dumb, but the horse community is a whole lot different than the tractor community, and I'm sure there are polite little things that should be done. I don't want the neighbor to sue me because her horse got hurt and I don't want her to hate me because I didn't do the right things. I just don't know what the right things are. Kinda hoping Richard and some of you other horse folks can give me some horse sense here.

    SHF


  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    6,737
    Tractor
    JD 8320 MFWD, JD 6415 MFWD, FEL, and cab, John Deere MFWD 4600, John Deere 4020, John Deere 4430, John Deere 455 mower, Deutz, and Gehl 4610 perkins skidsteer

    Default Re: Horse Help

    SHF,
    Not quite sure what your asking. Do you want to know about raising horses or what you should do with your neighbors horse? Give me a couple of specific questions. As far as to that horse getting away and running like that just stay the heck out of the way. I've seen well meaining people either get hurt themselves really bad or make the situation with the horse even worse. Legally or otherwise you have no responsibility there at all. If you don't have any horse experience it is seriously better to just stay out of the way.
    The biggest thing that you have to remember about horses is that they are a prey animal. They are hunted by other animals in the wild. Their instinct whenever anything happens is to run and they don't care what the consequences are. They'll run through barb wire, over cliffs, you name it they'll do it if they are scared. I've seen the most friendly well trained horses spook at something and they are gone and heaven help anything in their way or anyone on their back. Now with that said you can train horses to not spook but they are very few and far between. Very rarely do you find a truly broke horse. Most people ride their horses 3-10 times a year at best and the rest of the time they are out in a pasture or a stall left to their own. It takes constant training and riding to get a safe horse. Anyway that's kind of what I thought you were asking. Let me know what else you need to know.


  3. #3
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Posts
    731

    Default Re: Horse Help

    Not to be to grotesque, but if you happen to have a backhoe (and they don't) you might offer to dig a hole for them and move the body...not something you want to do by hand.




  4. #4

    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    1,310
    Location
    Michigan
    Tractor
    Kubota L3650/AC B210

    Default Re: Horse Help

    Thanks guys.

    Basically this has sook the heck outta us. My wife dreamed about the horse all night long, and we weren't even there to see the accident. I guess what I'm asking is if there is a preferred gesture in the horse community. ie, sending a card? Just commiserating? I'm thinking that if I lost my dog, I wouldn't expect the neighbors to be too concerned about it. But... this is a big animal, the whole situation seems horrible and it happened right in front of my house. I guess I've just got that same helpless feeling I get when I watch the news about another school shooting. Nothing I can do there either, but it seems like there should be.

    Also, do you guys think a coyote could have spooked that horse? There's a big one running around out there. I had a buddy hunting from a tree stand last year and the coyote chased a doe right under him. A few weeks ago we heard one of the other neighbors had a colt and mare chewed on. They think by a coyote.

    Either way, it's too bad, this lady rode that horse just about every day.

    SHF

    PS

    The neighbor DOES have a hoe. A mighty fine lookin yellow JD that I been eyeballin'.


  5. #5
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    6,737
    Tractor
    JD 8320 MFWD, JD 6415 MFWD, FEL, and cab, John Deere MFWD 4600, John Deere 4020, John Deere 4430, John Deere 455 mower, Deutz, and Gehl 4610 perkins skidsteer

    Default Re: Horse Help

    SHF,
    Ok I see what you're saying now. There really isn't any horse etiquette or rules to speak of. If you wanted to send a sympathy card that would be nice but certainly isn't expected in any horse circles that I know of.


  6. #6
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    1,692
    Location
    Cambridge New York (north of Albany, next to Vermont)
    Tractor
    Kubota L4630, with cab and loader, 1951 Ferguson TO-20, 1967 Oliver 1550 with fel

    Default Re: Horse Help

    SHF, as usual, I agree with Richard. Do what feels right.
    As far as the horse being spooked by a coyote, Richard explained the flight instinct of a horse pretty well. When a horse is spooked, he will run. It's amazing what will spook a horse. It can be something that the horse just sees out of the corner of his eye. As Richard explained, a horse is a prey animal, and they're always wary of predators, even when none exist. I once saw our three horses chased throughout the pasture by a wild turkey![img]/w3tcompact/icons/shocked.gif[/img] They saw something running at them, and just didn't take any chances. What I'm trying to say, is almost anything may have spooked the horses, you'll probably never know what it was.
    Rich


  7. #7

    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    1,310
    Location
    Michigan
    Tractor
    Kubota L3650/AC B210

    Default Re: Horse Help

    Thanks guys. That's what I wanted to know. We've already called and when we go out next weekend, we might stop and pass along our condolences again. I know it was a dumb question, but I just didn't know if there was an etiquette to be observed. (And couldn't remember how to even spell etiquette). I know these folks cared a lot for the horse (moved it daily to different pasture, etc).

    Your advise about staying out of the way is also well heeded. I haven't been on a horse since I was a child, and they sure seem a lot bigger now than they did then. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img]

    Just seems an awful waste. They tell me it took an hour for the vet to arrive and animal control was right behind him. Don't like to see anything suffer like that. Vet science has'nt progressed enough to fix something like that?

    SHF




  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    6,737
    Tractor
    JD 8320 MFWD, JD 6415 MFWD, FEL, and cab, John Deere MFWD 4600, John Deere 4020, John Deere 4430, John Deere 455 mower, Deutz, and Gehl 4610 perkins skidsteer

    Default Re: Horse Help

    SHF,
    You bet you can fix something like that but you're talking about alot of money and depending on if the break was really bad then the horse would probably be crippled. You've really got to love an animal to spend the kind of money it would have taken to have fixed the horses leg.


  9. #9

    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    49
    Location
    Vermont
    Tractor
    Kubota L4610HST

    Default Re: Horse Help

    SHF,

    I suppose you realize that the owner made quite a mistake securing their horse to a light weight swing set. I am sure they are kicking themselves over that right now.

    Driver



  10. #10

    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    230
    Location
    East of Seattle, Washington
    Tractor
    64 MF Utility 35 retired to parts pile.

    Default Re: Horse Help

    Treat the gal as if she lost a family member. That is best. There are good and bad horse people. Like with any family loss, I pitch in if needed. The backhoe and labor part helps if she wants it. We can't legally bury on the place anymore. County says they go to the renderrer. (glue) We have bear and cougar in the back and because the growth and such, have kept the horses out of there. If and when I clear out the back, I'll still leave the animals access out of harms way. The owner has to be aware of the public access to these critters out front too. Ya just never know when they will spook and what for. We were horse poor several years ago when I said, "Out". Now we keep a fewer but cared for more bunch of kids.
    If you see this gal tying her next one back up to the swing set, I'd say it was time to be concerned. For the horse.

    "What is a weed? A plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)

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