Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. #1
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    248
    Location
    Parkland,Washington State, U.S.A.
    Tractor
    Bolens TX 1504 (G154) 1957 John Deere 420C crawler

    Default Your farm/ranch support you or do you support it?


    I have to ask because I'm ready to leave the wet side of this state, and buy 100 or so acres in Eastern Washington. I hate the faster pace of life and neighbors who stare with blank looks when you wave at them over here. Over here, everyone seems too busy to give a hand to another who is in need, and when you do stop to help them, they either act like you owe them and leave without thanking you or they'll rob you after you help them! On the dry side of this state, I've been given change for gas I bought over a year prior. At the time, I figured I wasn't going to bug them for 75 cents. When I passed through a little over a year later, the clerk remembered and gave me the change.

    I recieve a veteran's compensation, so I should be able to make ends meet if I have to support the farm, but I would rather the farm make me and my two daughters little spending cash.

    Any ideas on what to farm or ranch on 100 or so acres to help make ends meet? How about leasing the land to other farmers?

    Oh! I have another question; What kinds of things should I look out for when I buy this land? Water or irrigation rights? well depth? Anything else?

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    6,737
    Tractor
    JD 8320 MFWD, JD 6415 MFWD, FEL, and cab, John Deere MFWD 4600, John Deere 4020, John Deere 4430, John Deere 455 mower, Deutz, and Gehl 4610 perkins skidsteer

    Default Re: Your farm/ranch support you or do you support it?

    Eastern Washington is all going to depend on the ground if you can do anything with it. After paying the payments, water costs, taxes, and insurance you probably won't make alot off it. If it's not irrigated you won't make a dime off of it. Some of the ground in eastern washington is some of the best farm ground in the country. The rest of it takes 20-30 acres to support one cow and some of it not even that. If it's irrigated good farmground, alot of $ upfront but you do have an income potential, you can raise about anything.

    As far as what to look for it all just depends on what kind of land you want to buy. You can buy everything from great farm ground to desert. It will range in price from $500 - $5000 per acre.

  3. #3
    Super Member Highbeam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,039
    Location
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Tractor
    Kioti CK30HST

    Default Re: Your farm/ranch support you or do you support it?

    The suburban folk aren't that bad. Bad enough to lock your truck at night, bad enough to carry a pistol, but not bad enough to run away from. Now in Parkland/Spanaway you'll have some shady characters. A little extra crime and drug traffic to make even the good neighbors leery of strangers.

    I have spent a good bit of time in EWA. It is a great place with four seasons and a wide variety of terrain. You should be able to find anything from alpine forest to riverbottom muck. People are pretty much the same everywhere so try to avoid the spanaway of EWA. Maybe look for a defunct farm. Apple orchards seem pretty common and pretty often bankrupt. You've got to figure that if it is good farmland in a reasonably populated part of EWA then it is or has been farmed. No pioneering necessary.

    I like the timberline areas over there. The trees offer shade and some wind protection.

  4. #4
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    248
    Location
    Parkland,Washington State, U.S.A.
    Tractor
    Bolens TX 1504 (G154) 1957 John Deere 420C crawler

    Default Re: Your farm/ranch support you or do you support it?

    The area I'm looking at is a few miles west of the Moses Lake area. It has an irrigation ditch that borders the western edge of the property. I don't know if I'll have any rights to it though.

  5. #5
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    462
    Location
    western NY
    Tractor
    MF GC2300

    Default Re: Your farm/ranch support you or do you support it?

    I used to live in central WA, and I think cowboydoc gave you pretty good advice as to how to look for break-evenable / profitable land.

    Several years ago, I had a great job working for the BLM assessing range allotments in central WA from Oregon to the Canadian border. That northern part of WA is fantastic from about Tonasket north. Not too many people if you're far enough from the Cascades. Stay away from anything close to SH-2, I-90, and Wenatchee. The population doubles-triples every weekend with Seattlelites in Wenatchee/Chelan. (Highbeam's got a good point; there's good and bad people everywhere, but if you're looking for low-key I'd avoid a place that swells on a weekly basis.) As you get into that north-country, there's tales of wackos off the beaten path. Border Patrol used to buzz us in helicopters when they were looking for pot plantations, illegals, etc.

    Last time I was through Moses Lake (3-4 years ago), it looked like it was growing FAST. It may turn into what you're trying to leave behind!

    Anyway, good luck to you...

  6. #6
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    718
    Location
    Maine
    Tractor
    Cub Cadet 7360SS & Craftsman GT3000 23 HP w/50

    Default Re: Your farm/ranch support you or do you support it?

    I found that THE most helpful activity was to do a business plan for the farm. What it did was to help me think through all aspects of it. It did wonders for understanding the risks, the finances, etc. I wasn't planning to borrow money, so it wasn't something I had to do... but it was very helpful. I also find it useful to go back over it once a year and update it. Stuff never happens exactly as you planned, the market changes, etc.

    The answer to your original question.... I support it, it doesn't support us. But the business plan says that will change over the next six years. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

  7. #7
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    564
    Location
    NE Texas
    Tractor
    Mahindra 5005DI

    Default Re: Your farm/ranch support you or do you support it?

    I am in East Texas, so I don't know what the markets/geography is like in your part of the world. Most folks 'round here have a "real" job that supports their ranch/farm projects. I have actually been looking at maybe taking over my dad's small ranch and expanding it. I am in a rather unique situation, though. Dad has spent his life supporting the ranch w/ OTR trucking until recently. I have had a string of real jobs that are paying for my land/house. Dad's place and 95% of the equipment is paid for and still in good shape. If I took over I would be looking at nearly stepping in debt free. I don't know if I could generate enough income just off the existing cow/calf operation to pay a mortgage, equipment financing and cow notes, plus eat and keep the lights turned on.
    I guess the short answer is: Currently we support it.

  8. #8
    Super Member Farmwithjunk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    7,514
    Location
    Mt Washington, Kentucky
    Tractor
    Where do I begin.....

    Default Re: Your farm/ranch support you or do you support it?

    Our farm pays it's own way, and even make a few bucks yearly. HOWEVER... It sure wouldn't afford us the lifestyle we have and want to keep. That comes from my wife and I both working full-time day jobs as well. The farm makes enough to cover the mortgage, operating expenses, and improvements. It doesn't pay enough to buy new cars or trucks, new equipment as I want it, nor would it provide enough income for insurance (life/health).

    The farm and its income has been enough to increase our net worth (by paying the mortgage on the place) It hasn't lined my pockets though.

    The farm has let us ENJOY a lifestyle we both dreamed about growing up. That alone is enough to justify all the effort.

  9. #9
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    248
    Location
    Parkland,Washington State, U.S.A.
    Tractor
    Bolens TX 1504 (G154) 1957 John Deere 420C crawler

    Default Re: Your farm/ranch support you or do you support it?


    I was recently offered $290,000 for my little one acre plot of land here near McCord Air Force Base. I told the realestate person the house was old and needed tons of work. He said he didn't care because he can bulldoze everything on the acre and put three houses on it and make a tidy profit. I figured I can buy the land I'm looking at and build a nice house with a workshop and barn. After that, I have my veteran's disability income for toys and taxes (You have to pay for both!) What I'm really after is having someplace quiet to build things for my little tractor. Also, I'd like to have a little garden and a place to hunt. If I can find something for the land to do to line my wallet with a little cash, I'd like to.

  10. #10
    Super Member Highbeam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,039
    Location
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Tractor
    Kioti CK30HST

    Default Re: Your farm/ranch support you or do you support it?

    If you like the puget sound area, take a look at the Key Penninsula near Gig Harbor. I bought land out there and it is very quiet without so many people. Land is still less than 6000$ per acre. Moving to a place like Moses Lake brings with it extreme hot and cold along with wind year round. Can't say I would want to live out on the tundra like that.

    I have made (helped make) farmers into millionares by taking their land, say 25 acres, and turning it into 100 homesites. I know it is odd, but that's what people seem to want.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2014 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.