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  1. #11
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    386
    Location
    Southeastern Mass
    Tractor
    New Holland 1920

    Default Re: Gloves

    WVBill, there are 3 pieces of eqiupment I use every time I get on the NH. Gloves, a hard hat (hit my head on roll bar when operating the BH, and wrap around safety glasses (usually dark sun glass type). The glasses have saved my eyes from branches as well as dirt (especially when pulling roots with BH). Just my thoughts on safety items.

    Bill C

  2. #12
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    1,573
    Location
    Waco, Texas
    Tractor
    Kubota B2910; Kubota T1670

    Default Re: Gloves

    I generally use thinner gloves, like pigskin or split-leather, for most tasks. They are indispensible. I just purchased a pair of chainsaw gloves from Baileys.com that are very comfortable. They have cut-resistent backs and thick leather palms. I believe they were about $15.

  3. #13
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    47,325
    Location
    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: Gloves

    Sounds similar to a game my horse used to play.. It was called, "Guess my weight". While grooming the horse, this particular one would look you in the eye, and then ease his front hoof onto the corner of your foot.. Many a time I have snatched my foot out leaving the shoe, an/or sock still firmly wedged under hoof. My wife use to wear sandals out to the barn, but since playing 'guess my weight' with the horse, she wears boots or at minimum, garden clogs...

    Soundguy

    <font color=blue>" I hate to think what a 500# tractor implement would do if it dropped on an unprotected toe. "

  4. #14

    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    35
    Location
    westchester county ,new york
    Tractor
    kubota BX-22

    Default Re: Gloves

    i keep many different gloves around for specific chores, surgical for changing oils or gassing up 2-strokes,comfortable leathers for mowing or BH work,cheap brown cottons for messy jobs then toss them out, i am a volunteer fireman and have begun wearing my extra set of extrication gloves lately around the shop and wonder why i had not thought about that a long time ago. just my thoughts

  5. #15
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    37,309
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Gloves

    <font color=blue>i keep many different gloves around for specific chores</font color=blue>

    How many is many? I think I'm down to only 5 now.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img]

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    182
    Location
    Fergus, Ontario,Canada
    Tractor
    Cub Cadets 104,129,149, Jinma 284

    Default Re: Gloves

    You have to be Carefull around rotating stuff with gloves on.
    A guy at work got his glove caught in the big drill press and it ripped most of the meat off his hand.Now they have a picture of his hand on the wall saying Don't wear gloves at the drill press. It was one **** of a mess.

  7. #17
    Super Member
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    5,769
    Location
    Wylie, Texas
    Tractor
    JCB165HF

    Default Re: Gloves

    I don't wear gloves much at all. I used to never wear them except for hot things like grabbing stuff I'd just welded.

    But after losing the pad on my right thumb when it gets below forty degrees the right hand gets a glove. It doesn't like the cold much.

    The work I do puts my hands in places where lots of times an extra eighth of an inch is the difference between "OW!!!" and "Whew! that was close." The cuts and nicks are just part and parcel of life. My kids all learned to count by touching the owies on dad's hands.

    By the same token I wear metatarsal protection boots. They cost me a hundred and seventy five a couple to three times a year but I feel naked without them. I haven't smashed a foot since I started wearing them. When folks ask about them I proudly tell them I haven't lost a foot stomping contest since I started wearing them. And I've worked around some pretty big horses too.

    Welding and working mean lots of sparks flying. You learn to ignore the tingle they give you. Many has been the time when a dingleberry (little red BB of steel) has landed on exposed skin and there wasn't time or space to do anything but ignore it. Even when the smell of burning flesh almost turned the stomach. It isn't about macho. It's about work.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    1,807
    Location
    Sharpsburg, Md
    Tractor
    John Deere 4100 HST

    Default Re: Gloves

    Are extrication gloves what I think they are? [img]/w3tcompact/icons/shocked.gif[/img]

    To be nice, cleaning up the mess from an accident.

    Terry

  9. #19

    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    35
    Location
    westchester county ,new york
    Tractor
    kubota BX-22

    Default Re: Gloves

    extrication gloves are basically gloves i wear when you dont need protection from heat or flame.
    we dont see alot of structure fires but we do get loads of car wrecks.
    extrication gloves are like a heavy duty "mechanix gloves" made by (ringer) i think?
    very comfortable,and wear pretty well too ..........and they provide great dexterity w/the fingetips
    IMO
    any other volunteer fireman out there?
    take care,
    scott

  10. #20
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    47,325
    Location
    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: Gloves

    I don't weld or cut much, but what always gets me is when milling or using the drill press, without fail, a piece of hot metal will always fly to my arm, etc. I don't wear loose clothes around the milling maching, usually not gloves either, and i dont like to take my eyes off the maching while it is running, so like you, Sometimes you just have to smell the burnt skin cause it may be more dangerous to react to it than to ignore it.

    Soundguy

    <font color=blue>"Welding and working mean lots of sparks flying. You learn to ignore the tingle they give you. Many has been the time when a dingleberry (little red BB of steel) has landed on exposed skin and there wasn't time or space to do anything but ignore it. Even when the smell of burning flesh almost turned the stomach. It isn't about macho. It's about work. "

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